Afghan Institute of Learning

The Afghan Institute of Learning (AIL) works to empower all Afghans who are needy, especially women and children, providing them the knowledge and skills to care for themselves. AIL is expanding access to quality education and healthcare through community based programming, enabling communities to develop the capacity of their people. The goal is to create a foundation of quality education and health systems throughout Afghanistan which meet the needs of local people now and in the future. AIL was founded by an Afghan woman and is run by women, reaching thousands each year through health facilities, educational centers and training programs.
Jul 7, 2011

One young man's achievement

One young Afghan boy who now attends an AIL-supported center in Pakistan had this to say:  “My sister and I were working for our family and collecting dirt, useless papers and things from the street and around the shops.  A shopkeeper told us about this center and asked why we don’t attend.  We joined the center and now we are very happy because we can read everything and the world is bright for us.  Our teacher encourages us a lot.  I study and work very hard and have obtained first position in my class.”

Jul 7, 2011

Showcasing this skill to the public

The carpet weaving projects have expanded as AIL is now offering this instruction at the newly re-opened Citadel in Herat City.  This location is for the public, and classes are being held on a regular basis and the required materials and instructors are being paid for by AIL.  As interest in this skill grows, the need for additional frames becomes necessary.  AIL Staff took a frame for carpet making from one of the learning centers and will be making plans to purchase two additional frames soon in order to continue the production of carpets.   

Jul 7, 2011

Great outcomes!

A recent report by “Save the Children” listed Afghanistan as the worst place to be a woman.  One reason for this was the very high mortality rate.  According to that report, the lifetime risk of maternal death is 1 in 11, and the life expectancy of a female in Afghanistan is 45.

 AIL continues to reach more people, especially women, through their health education programs.  Subjects taught include women’s health, violence against women, reproductive health, first aid, self-immolation, family planning, vaccinations, nutrition and other topics requested by participants. 

 Additionally, AIL began a pilot program for Expectant Mothers in November, 2010.  We are beginning to see the results of this program, and they are very positive. Since the Expectant Mother program workshops started in November 2010:

  • only 6 mothers from the 37 who attended workshops in November 2010 through February 2011 gave birth at home.  The vast majority have had their babies at the clinic or hospital. This is remarkable in a society where home birth is the norm and where today’s mothers were most likely born at home and have mothers themselves or mothers in law who believe home birth the accepted practice as they themselves experienced it.  These women have little or no access to women who have had births at clinics or hospitals so they are stepping out of the known in choosing a clinic birth.
  • Only one stillbirth and one complication were recorded for the 37 women who have had their babies since attending a workshop. This is a rate of  2.7%. The national average is currently recorded by UNFPA for stillbirth as 70 per 1000 live births and by Afghan government as 5.2% in 2010 for neonatal death.
  • There have been no maternal deaths compared to national rate of 820 deaths per 100,000 births (UNFPA) and as 1.4% by UNICEF
 
   

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