International Action

International Action collaborates with partner groups and local communities in Haiti to build up local capacities in water resource management; raise the public's awareness of water-related health issues; advocate for water-related policies and development priorities that ensure equitable and affordable access to clean water for all; and support community-based water purification and distribution projects.
Apr 16, 2012

137,500 more children to be protected from worms

It has been well documented by many public health experts, including Dr. Dean Karlan (faculty at Yale University and author of More than Good Intentions), that protecting children and families from intestinal worms is one of the most effective ways of reducing diarrhea and improving school attendance rates. All it takes is 2 doses of albendazole a year to protect children from intestinal worms, just two. As a result of the success of our de-worming campaign, we have decided to increase its reach. 

In partnership with AmeriCares, we will help treat 140,000 children -- at thirteen different clinics and hospitals -- who are afflicted with intestinal worms. 140,000 children will be healthy enough to attend and thrive in school. Health, education, and jobs are three of the most important sectors in Haiti that need improvement. Our De-worming Campaign helps improve all three.

Apr 11, 2012

16,000 Haitians protected from cholera in Jacmel

Meyer Water Site
Meyer Water Site

International Action Haiti’s southeast water project aims to install chlorinators, water pumps, and water tanks in 54 schools in the Sud-Est department of Haiti, as well as in many hospitals and public water sites.

Timeline for school completion:

The installations of our chlorinators at each of the 54 schools, along with the creation of Water Boards will be completed by the end of June, 2012. The children are our first prioirty. The schools are going to open up their clean water stations to the public after school. This requires each school to have a Water Board.  

Schools:

1)      Ecole Nationale Eximagilles – 433 students

2)      Lycée Cely Lamour – 2,400

3)      Lycée Pinchinat – 2,020 students

4)      Efaca de Meyer – 596 students

5)      Lycée de Cayes-Jacmel – 1,050 students

6)      College les Quatres Evangelistes – 104 students

7)      Centre d’Etudes Secondaire de Jacmel – 295 students

8)      Lycée Celie Lamour – 2,400

9)      École La Dignité -- 236

Total student population that now has clean water – 9534 Haitian students

Community Water Sites :

1)      Cyvadier (with DINEPA) – 616 famlies

2)      Meyer (with DINEPA) – 500 families

3)      Saint Michel Hospital – 20,000 patients per month

 

Total population that now has clean water – approximately 6,000 Haitians year round and 20,000 patients per month

 

Installation Spotlight

We are charging ahead with the Sud-Est Clean Water Initiative, centered around Jacmel, Haiti. By the end of June, we will have installed water treatment systems in 54 schools and many hospitals and public office buildings. February 7, 2012 marked the start of our full schedule of water treatment installations in the south-east of Haiti. We will complete three installations a week. You can check out reports from the field at www.HaitiWater.org to follow our progress. 

The first wave of installations will include eight schools and one hospital. Collège les Quatre Evangelistes, a school, was the first completed on February 7. The 103 students of Collège les Quatre Evangelistes now have clean water because of their new 150-gallon tank and chlorinator. The students’ families and nearby residents in the neighborhood also have access to the clean water at the school. 

To appreciate the full impact of the installation at Collège les Quatre Evangelistes, we have to look at who exactly we are helping, not just how many.

Collège les Quatre Evangelistes is one of the most innovative schools in all of Haiti. In large part this is because it is one of the most affordable schools in Haiti – many children in Haiti do not attend school because their parents cannot afford the price of private schools (all schools in Haiti are private schools.) The teachers are volunteers. This shows how important this school is: teachers are willing to volunteer on a near full-time basis. Collège les Quatre Evangelistes gives parents a chance to send their students to schools, regardless of how much they can pay.

The cost is not the only innovative aspect of this school. The school’s Director, Rigaud Emmanuel Rousseau, is teaching these 103 students not only academics, but also the importance of building up their community. The school’s mission is to give a quality education to students and to encourage them to help build up their community, both now and in the future.

Moreover, Mr. Rigaud also uses the school space for community events such as microcredit classes for women and nutrition programs for children.  

What you did for us today is beyond amazing. Can you imagine that we’ve been here for this many years without clean water? I promise to allow the community to come after school hours to also get clean water. Please thank your donors and may God continue to bless them. You’ve given us hope”

  Rigaud Emmanuel Rousseau                                                                                                                   Director of Collège les Quatre Evangelistes

The clean water these 103 students, family members, and women of the community can now access will immediately improve their health, allowing them to spend less time collecting water and increasing the potential this school can offer to all students and community members involved. 

 

Many thanks to all involved.

The International Action Team.

Apr 4, 2012

New public schools need books, in French and Creole

To improve the literacy rate in Haiti -- 51% of the population is literate -- International Action will begin supplying schools with children's book in French, as well as the Creole books we are already distributing.

Haiti's Education System Background: 

The earthquake did not cause Haiti's education woes. Even before the earthquake only half of the country's school-aged children attended school. Another issue is that there are very few public schools. Less than 10% of the schools in Haiti are public. The price per student to attend a private school in Haiti ranges from between US$20 to US$50 per year. This may not seem like much, but 80% of the population in Haiti lives below the international poverty line -- making $554 or less per year. For a family with three children that would mean $60 per year (this is the minimum private schools would charge), or about 9% of their income for primary school. This does not include school materials or money for food. If parents that make a combine $60,000 in the US had to pay 9% of their income for their kids to go to elementary school, they would be paying $5,400. 

Shortly after president Martelly took office in 2011, he announced his plan to have all school-aged Haitian children attending school by 2015. 

The plan calls for schools to be free to attend. It does not address funding for school supplies or improving classroom conditions. A student in a classroom is a great first step, but it is not enough. Students need teachers and they need materials.

Need for children's books written in French: 

Teachers often teach in Creole and French, but the majority of lessons are taught in French. Because classes are more often than not taught in French, schools need children's books in French. For children in Haiti to best learn how to read, they need to be taught by trained teachers. Since teachers give lessons in French, students need books in French in order to get the full benefit of having teachers. This would improve the students' chances of becoming literate (only 51% of Haitians are literate).

International Action will be working with 20 schools in Cite Soleil in order to decide which French children's books will be most helpful for students. The teachers will have these books integrated into their curriculum before the start of the 2012 -- 2013 school year. 

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