Aug 8, 2019

Fighting For A Culture Of Respect & Equality

Screening Panelists
Screening Panelists

Dear Friend, 

It has been several months since our last report in May and I wanted to give you an update on our activities over the past months. TELL has been busy delivering workshops, providing face to face counseling and running our crisis support Lifeline and chat service. 

We have delivered 18 workshops in Tokyo, Kansai, and Okinawa, on a wide range of topics from mental health in the workplace, to communicating with teens, cyberbullying, and sexual harassment in the workplace just to name a few. We also marched in the Tokyo Rainbow Pride Festival, making a noise about youth LGBTQIA mental health issues and handing out information cards and resources to over 1000 people. And on May 30th we held a free screening of the BBC documentary ‘Japan’s Secret Shame’. This is a documentary telling the story of a female journalist who shocked Japan with her public allegation of rape. The screening was followed by a panel discussion that explored the themes outlined by the film and continues the conversation about the challenges of reporting and seeking justice around sexual violence in Japan. The panelist included mental health professionals, survivors of sexual violence and support services in the community. 

As we work towards our funding goal, TELL will continue to fight for a culture of respect and equality for all in Japan.

Our next call for action is our Tokyo Tower Climb as part of our World Suicide Prevention Day activities.  We hope to have 500 people climbing up Tokyo Tower to raise awareness & funds about the issue of mental health and suicide in Japan and to help expand our overnight crisis chat service.  We will also hold walks across the country talking to people about mental health issues and handing out information cards on resources and recognizing the warning signs of someone at risk. Sadly, around the globe, the number of young people feeling overwhelmed by the pressures of school, life, and the future is increasing and here in Japan, youth suicide rates have hit record highs. 

Thank you, everyone, for your support of TELL and our work in Japan. We hope you feel proud of your contributions and the difference you are helping to make in Japan. 

Film Screening - Japan's Secret Shame
Film Screening - Japan's Secret Shame
Tower Tower Climb
Tower Tower Climb
Tokyo Pride Festival
Tokyo Pride Festival

Links:

Jun 13, 2019

June Report - Saving Lives is a Community Effort

Tokyo Pride Festival
Tokyo Pride Festival

Earlier this year, we came to you with a funding request to support our efforts in preventing youth suicides in Japan. We are asking for your support in helping us to train more volunteer support workers for our Lifeline and Crisis Chat support service so we can increase our hours of service and support to young people in crisis.

We wanted to give you an update on the situation in Japan and our activities over the past few months. In 2019, the Japanese government announced that suicide is now the leading cause of death for young people aged 10 to 14 years of age, the highest number since the postwar period.  With 50% of all mental illnesses having their onset before 14 years of age and 75% by 24, awareness and education highlighting what mental illness looks like and how to best support a young person is vital. Sadly in March this year, two 12-year-old girls jumped together to their death due to bullying, because of the stigma, lack of services and understanding surrounding mental health issues in Japan. 

As we work towards our funding goal, TELL will continue to break down the barriers and fight against the stigma surrounding mental illness in Japan. In April TELL marched in the Tokyo Pride Festival and handed out information about crisis support for LGBTQIA+ youths. TELL also held numerous school awareness presentations across the country speaking to students about our services and mental illness. In May TELL screened the BBC documentary ‘Japan’s Secret Shame’ followed by a panel discussion on support services for survivors of sexual violence in Japan and on September 8th TELL will hold its 3rd Tokyo Tower Climb as part of our World Suicide Prevention day activities.

We hope you will consider supporting our project and work in Japan. Your donations matter and can make a real difference in a young person’s life. Together we make a difference, will you join TELL in our fight for zero suicide in Japan. 

School visit
School visit
Tokyo Tower Climb 2019
Tokyo Tower Climb 2019
May 10, 2019

Fighting For A Culture Of Respect & Equality

School Visit
School Visit

Dear Friend,

In February, we came to you with a funding request to support our efforts to fight to create #BalanceforBetter in Japan. We are happy to announce that through the Girls Campaign and with all your support we are a quarter of the way to our target, and we would like to provide you with an update of our activities so far.

Firstly, all of the board and staff at TELL would like to thank each of you very much for your kind and generous support in the work we do. Over the last couple of months, TELL has delivered 15 workshops in schools, universities, and workplaces across Japan, including three on sexual harassment issues. In addition, we have also provided training or raised awareness of suicide prevention, mental health, stigma, bullying, and LGBTQIA+ issues.

We would also like to give you an update on the situation surrounding sexual harassment in Japan. A recent survey by the Japanese NPO #WeToo Japan, of 12,000 respondents aged 15 - 49, found 70% of women reported experiencing some form of unwanted sexual advances. The survey also found that over 60% of respondents felt kissing equated with consent, and more males equated going out to eat or for drinks with the expectation of sex.

Earlier in the year, a poster produced by a major Japanese school uniform maker which was posted across the country read - ‘That short skirt you think is cute leads to sexual crimes ‘. The #WeToo Japan survey, also found that less than 10% of women who had been assaulted reported the incident to the police.  The results of the survey, and the comments of the poster highlight the lack of knowledge on the concept of consent and acceptance of victim blaming within Japanese society.  Furthermore, suicide prevention research has found that around 25% of rape and sexual assault victims will go on to take their lives.

As we work towards our funding goal, TELL will continue to fight for a culture of respect and equality for all in Japan.  Our next call for action will be on May 30th, when TELL will show a free screening of the BBC documentary ‘Japan’s Secret Shame’. This is a film telling the story of a female journalist who shocked Japan with her public allegation of rape, which will be followed by a discussion of the issues in Japan.

Thank you, everyone, for your support of TELL and our work in Japan. We hope you feel proud of your contributions and the difference you are helping to make in Japan.  

Japan's Secret Shame
Japan's Secret Shame
Thank you
Thank you

Links:

 
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