Awamaki

Awamaki collaborates with the greater Ollantaytambo community to create economic opportunities and improve social well-being.
Dec 30, 2014

Fun with numbers

Knitter Rosa, right, with staff member Silvia
Knitter Rosa, right, with staff member Silvia

Dear friends, 

With your help, we have had a great year at Awamaki, and we couldn't have done it without you.

We now count 24 international retail partners carrying the women's products, up from nine last year. We have sold $110,000 of artisan products, up from $87,000 last year. We have put $120,000 directly in the hands of women, through our artisan products sales and our tourism program.

Ever wonder what all this means on the ground?

It means that 96% of the women in our programs report that their income has increased with our program.

46% spend the extra income on education, including school supplies, fees, or room and board for children at university.

38% use their extra earnings to save.

80% eat more meat and vegetables than they did before working with us. 

78% feel more confident to participate in decision-making processes within their cooperatives, communities or households. How do we know? Women say:

"I have a stronger position in the community through my connection to other women."

"I am not afraid to speak up anymore."

"I can work and earn my own money."

"I am more disciplined in my life."

"Now I interact more with people from outside my community."

"Our group meetings help us communicate at a higher level." 

This means empowerment that few women in these communities have ever experienced. It also means real changes in households. Women report their husbands helping spin wool, take care of kids, and even cook lunch, the main meal of the day, when they have an order to finish.

You are making these changes possible, and for that we want to say thank you. Next year, our goal is to teach the groups to manage their own order production, financial management and quality control. We don't want them to depend on anyone--not even us--to run their own businesses and earn a livelihood for themselves and their families.

We hope you will donate today to keep investing in the lives and empowerment of these women, and the futures of their children and their communities.  Thank you and have a great New Year!

Thank you from one of our weaving groups
Thank you from one of our weaving groups
Dec 23, 2014

What's changing in Patacancha?

Simeona doing an exercise
Simeona doing an exercise

What's changing in Patacancha? What is the impact you see? How is life different in the households where the women you work with live?

Just the other day, a former volunteer who is now a college senior doing a thesis asked me these questions. We get asked this a lot, and sometimes we have to tell the awkward truth: We don't always know. We aren't in the households. Indigenous communities aren't very open to outsiders, and we don't always see what goes on behind the scenes. We are really busy running an ambitous project on a shoestring budget. We don't always take the time necessary to find out the answers. It's not pretty, but it's true.

Except sometimes, we get some wonderful volunteers to come and help us out! This past week, our volunteers Merel and Jessa ran a three-hour workshop in the community of Huilloc that they spent weeks preparing. This is their account. Spoiler alert: It's fabulous. 

Because we wanted this presentation to be a fun and interactive activity, we designed exercises in which the women had to draw, arrange pictures, or discuss a number of questions amongst themselves in small groups. 
 
During the discussions and exercises they told us that since their involvement with Awamaki, gender roles have been changing in their households. Men, for example, help them with the spinning of wool, and they take care of the children and cook for the family when the women are busy working. When asked if they liked this change, the women started laughing shyly and then all said: yes! Before, women used to help their husbands on the land and were the sole caretakers of their children and responsible for all domestic chores. They explained that because of their own work, and their own income, they are less dependent on their husbands. They also said they liked contributing to their household expenses, and nearly all of them named their children's education as their most important expense for their new income.

The women also said that before working with Awamaki, they did not use natural dyes, only synthetic yarn. They also said that they have learned to make different types of clothing and accessories. Before, their skills were limited to making ponchos and shawls, traditional wear just for themselves. They said that now, they have better and more varied food, more clothes and the ability to build better houses. 

When we talked about the future, the women said they want to grow as leaders. "I want to learn to speak in public with confidence," one woman said. Several women explained that they are afraid to express themselves because sometimes in their community, men laughed at women when they said something in public because they stumbled on their words.

Your donations have made these changes possible. Workshops like the one that Merel and Jessa ran--with all the supplies, transportation, snacks and staff help--are entirely funded by your contributions. We couldn't do this without you. 

We wish we could invite you for a cup of coca tea and a visit to the communities, but we know that most of you live very far away. So we made a short video to bring you on a virtual visit. We hope it inspires you to come for a real visit in the new year!

Merel and Jessa running the workshop
Merel and Jessa running the workshop
Color cards!
Color cards!
Concentrating!
Concentrating!

Links:

Dec 23, 2014

Meet Martha!

Martha
Martha's staff picture

For this project report, we want to do something a little different. We want you to meet Martha, our newest staff member. 

We met Martha when we started working with our second knitting group, the Rumira group. Martha was a great knitter and the treasurer of the group. She was really impressive: responsible, smart, and a great knitter. 

So we offered her a job! This year, we added our seventh artisan group, and our production coordinator needed help. We brought Martha on board in May to help create products and manage the groups.

Martha is our first local in-house designer. As a skilled knitter, she creates new products, adjusts patterns, and spends lots and lots of time teaching the knitters how to make beautiful knitwear. She is the final word on quality control, and our business relies on her precise and consistent eye. She works with our international staff to understand trends, marketability and quality standards in the U.S.

Martha is a great knitter, but hadn't had much experience using a computer before--something we do a lot of at the office! After three months of training, though, she was picking it up fast. She now uses excel, word and email regularly. She is also proving herself a natural leader. She manages both of our knitting cooperatives and the spinners, and she is guiding them through our empowerment and business management trainings. 

When we asked Martha what empowerment means to her, she answered that for her, this means the ability to make your own decisions in lfe, instead of being dominated by your husband, and to have a feeling of control over your own life. She says,

"When I first started earning money with Awamaki, I was able to make more decisions about how we spend money in my house. Now, working for Awamaki, I feel more secure, and I can express my ideas and make decisions based on my own feelings...When I look at my fellow knitters from Rumira, I see these changes in their homes also."

Martha says that in Rumira, the women don't talk a lot about these issues. But as a leader and an Awamaki coordinator, she wants to change that. She doesn't feel like she has enough experience yet to give these trainings, but she is excited to be learning alongside other Awamaki staff. 

She got a chance to practice the other day at our first "Fair Trade and Empowerment Workshop." Martha went along to observe, but of course ended up translating, clarifying, and helping where she could. We are so lucky to have Martha as part of our team and a great example to rural women in the Sacred Valley!

P.S. We are so grateful to you, our supporters, for helping us offer economic opportunities to rural women like Marta and her knitting neighbors. We wish we could invite you for a cup of coca tea and host you for a visit, but we know that many of you live very far away. So, we made a video to invite you for a virtual visit and tell you how grateful we are for your support!

Marta teaching the spinners new skills
Marta teaching the spinners new skills

Links:

 
   

donate now:

An anonymous donor will match all new monthly recurring donations, but only if 75% of donors upgrade to a recurring donation today.
Terms and conditions apply.
Make a monthly recurring donation on your credit card. You can cancel at any time.
Make a donation in honor or memory of:
What kind of card would you like to send?
How much would you like to donate?
  • $10
    give
  • $20
    give
  • $40
    give
  • $70
    give
  • $100
    give
  • $150
    give
  • $200
    give
  • $820
    give
  • $10
    each month
    give
  • $20
    each month
    give
  • $40
    each month
    give
  • $70
    each month
    give
  • $100
    each month
    give
  • $150
    each month
    give
  • $200
    each month
    give
  • $820
    each month
    give
  • $
    give
gift Make this donation a gift, in honor of, or in memory of someone?
WARNING: Javascript is currently disabled or is not available in your browser. GlobalGiving makes extensive use of Javascript and will not function properly with Javascript disabled. Please enable Javascript and refresh this page.