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Sep 21, 2016

GABA 101, part 2; How Does GABA Inhibit Neurons

Wake Promoting Neurotransmitters
Wake Promoting Neurotransmitters

Idiopathic hypersomnia (IH) is a rare neurological disorder with symptoms of excessive sleep(iness) and sleep inertia. There is no test that can diagnose the disorder with certainty and there are no FDA approved treatments.  As a result there is an unmet clinical need for people with hypersomnia.  Due to a lack of a specific biomarker, diagnosis, therefore, can take decades, treatments are experimental, and the disabling effects of symptoms have a negative emotional, social and financial impact for people with hypersomnia and their loved ones.

The Hypersomnia Foundation strives to improve the lives of people with idiopathic hypersomnia and related disorders by advocating on their behalf, providing support, educating the public and healthcare professionals, raising awareness, and funding research into effective treatments, better diagnostic tools, and, ultimately, a cure for these debilitating conditions.

As part of this mission the Hypersomnia Foundation is working with Dr. Amanda Freeman to create a two part series titled GABA 101 - part 1 and part 2.  Dr. Freeman earned her PhD in Neuroscience at Emory University for research working with a team that have identified a novel neuroanatomical pathway that linkes dopamine to sleep regulatory circuits.   She collaborated with this team of clinicians and basic researchers to discern the mechanism underlying GABA-related primary hypersomnia.   The recent identification that hypersomnia may be caused in many cases by an endogenous peptide that accumulates in the brain and mimics the actions of sedatives and anesthetics, has attracted considerable attention since its discovery in 2012.

The GABA 101 - part 1 and 2 series, is being produced as part of the Hypersomnia Foundation's programs to increase awareness and education in primary hypersomnia and will be placed on its website for all interested viewers. The script for part 2 has been written, and the audio/video aligning with Dr. Freeman's Power Point Presention has been completed.  This project is in the vetting and editing phase in preparation of launch on the website.

Links:

Jun 24, 2016

Understanding GABA and primary hypersomnia

GABA
GABA

Primary hypersomnia is considered a rare disorder whose exact prevalence is unknown due to the lack of a sensitive and specific diagnostic test or biomarker. It is often considered a diagnosis of exclusion because hypersomnia has been conventionally taught to be secondary to other underlying disease processes. There are no FDA approved medications for hypersomnia whether primary or secondary. Thus, there has been little attention or resources committed by the pharmaceutical industry or funding agencies to its study. The recent identification that hypersomnia may be caused in many cases by an endogenous peptide that accumulates in the brain and mimics the actions of sedatives and anesthetics, has attracted considerable attention since its discovery in 2012. Treatments directed at mollifying an increased drive to sleep as opposed to traditional approaches focused up promoting the brain’s wake circuits show great promise in many patients. 

They Hypersomnia Foundation is working with Amanda Freeman, PhD at Emory University to create the second part of a 2 part series - Understanding GABA as it relates to primary hypersomnia.  Upon completion Parts I and II will be content added and available to the public through the Hypesomnia Foundation's website.

 

 

Modulation of Vigilance and GABA
Modulation of Vigilance and GABA
Sleep Promoting GABA
Sleep Promoting GABA
Mar 29, 2016

Completion of part 1 of a 2 part series; GABA 101 video

GABA and primary hypersomnia
GABA and primary hypersomnia

Dr. Freeman earned her PhD in Neuroscience at Emory University for research identifying a novel neuroanatomical pathway that linked dopamine to sleep regulatory circuits and has remained at Emory since that time.  Her current research to explore the genetic basis of Restless Legs Syndrome led to the first model of a human sleep disorder in Drosophila.  She has been able to collaborate with a team of clinicians and basic researchers to discern the mechanism underlying GABA-related primary hypersomnia.   The recent identification that hypersomnia may be caused in many cases by an endogenous peptide that accumulates in the brain and mimics the actions of sedatives and anesthetics, has attracted considerable attention since its discovery in 2012. 

The Hypersomnia Foundation, in partnership with Dr. Freeman, created a video that explains the mechanisims of GABA in part 1 of a 2 part series. These videos are being produced as part of the Hypersomnia Foundation's programs to increase awareness and education of research in primary hypersomnia and will be placed on its website for all interested viewers.

Links:

 
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