Wildlife Alliance

Wildlife Alliance is the leader in direct protection to forests and wildlife in the Southeast Asian tropical belt. Our mission is to combat deforestation, extinction, climate change, and poverty by partnering with local communities and governments.
Jun 19, 2015

World Day to Combat Desertification - June 17

Degraded landscape
Degraded landscape

Desertification is one of the biggest environmental challenges we face, and yet most people do not fully understand it. In order to bring attention to this critical issue, the United Nations General Assembly declared June 17 the World Day to Combat Desertification and Drought. Desertification does not actually refer to the spread of current deserts, but rather the irreversible degradation of soil through human activities such as deforestation, unsustainable farming, mining and overgrazing. It occurs when trees and root systems that bind the soil are removed causing topsoil erosion, and when unsustainable farming practices severely deplete nutrients. The result is an infertile mix of dust and sand that transforms fragile ecosystems into barren deserts while displacing the communities that depend on the land.

Since 2001, Wildlife Alliance has preserved 1.7 million acres of forestland and planted over 730,000 trees. Through advocacy, reforestation and law enforcement, we work tirelessly to preserve remaining forest cover and reconnect the canopy in the Southern Cardamom Mountains for the people and animals that depend on it. Our Community Agriculture Development Project incorporates sustainable farming practices into its land management strategy to empower local people to earn an income that does not depend on stripping the forest of its resources. Through forest protection and sustainable land management, we are working with local communities to not only prevent desertification, but also alleviate poverty and prevent food and water shortages.

Thank you for your continued support, we hope you'll join us in celebrating World Day to Combat Desertification by making a gift to the rangers that work dilegently to protect the Southern Cardamom Forest from illegal logging.

Illegally clearned forest
Illegally clearned forest
Southern Cardamoms- 2M Acres our Rangers Protect
Southern Cardamoms- 2M Acres our Rangers Protect
Jun 10, 2015

WRRT Wins UN Enviromental Enforcement Award

The Wildlife Rapid Rescue Team
The Wildlife Rapid Rescue Team

Wildlife Alliance is proud to announce that the Wildlife Rapid Rescue Team (WRRT) has been selected as a winner of the United Nations Environment Program’s Asia Environmental Enforcement Award (AEEA). The award from the United Nations recognizes the WRRT’s excellent work in combating environmental crime in Cambodia. Wildlife Alliance hopes that this acknowledgement dedicated to raising awareness about wildlife crime, will highlight the urgent need for more support and action in order to end illegal trafficking of wildlife and wildlife parts.

The award ceremony took place on May 20, 2015 in Bangkok, Thailand, before the Asia-Pacific Roundtable on Environmental Rule of Law for Sustainable Development. Senior officials including Mr. Achim Steiner, Executive Director, UNEP, Dr. Shamshad Akhtar, Executive Secretary, ESCAP, Chief Justices and Environment Ministers in Asia participated in the Roundtable and presented the award to the winners of AEEA. In his opening statement, Achim Steiner, UNEP Executive Director and United Nations Under-Secretary-General said, "Environmental crime undermines sustainable development. It is not only a threat to species, to habitats and to ecosystems, but also to human health, livelihoods and national economies. Enforcement action and efforts need to be recognized and awarded."

Since 2001, the Wildlife Rapid Rescue Team, a wildlife crime investigation and counter-trafficking unit composed of government and non-government staff, have fought to curb the illegal and unsustainable wildlife trade in Southeast Asia. The WRRT conducts operations on roads, in restaurants, in forests and in known and suspected wildlife markets. The team travels around the country intercepting illegal shipments of wildlife, responding to tips from informants and anonymous sources, investigating known wildlife trade offenders for potential new offenses, and rescuing wildlife victimized by wildlife traders, or caught in human-wildlife conflicts. Since its launch, the WRRT has rescued over 60,000 victims from the wildlife trade, resulting in a 75% reduction in wildlife trafficking country-wide, and a 90% decrease in wildlife sales in Phnom Penh restaurants. Their tireless hard work has led to the arrest or fining of over 2,700 offenders. Without the constant surveillance of the WRRT, endangered species throughout Southeast Asia would have disappeared entirely.

We applaud the Wildlife Rapid Rescue Team for their accomplishments and commitment to ending the illegal wildlife trade. We would also like to thank all the generous supporters that believe firmly in this mission. Their incredible work would not be possible without your dedication and passion for wildlife protection.

The WRRT is a Forestry Administration law enforcement unit led by the Forestry Administration, in cooperation with the Military Police, with technical and financial support from Wildlife Alliance.

Rescued sun bear cub being kept as a pet
Rescued sun bear cub being kept as a pet
Since 2001, over 60,000 animals have been rescued
Since 2001, over 60,000 animals have been rescued
Jun 4, 2015

Endangered Gibbons Have Baby

Baby gibbon peeking out at the world
Baby gibbon peeking out at the world

Last year, our released gibbons, Baray and Saranik, gave birth to their first baby! At the end 2013, a pair of endangered pileated gibbons that were raised at Phnom Tamao Wildlife Rescue Center (PTWRC), were successfully rehabilitated and reintroduced into the protected forest of Angkor Archaeological Park. This rehabilitation process has been in the works for over 10 years and we are excited to see the animals adjusting so well! Since their release, the gibbons have been closely monitored, and it has been quite remarkable how quickly they have adapted to their new life in the forest. Success of a reintroduction program is evaluated on the basis of survival and reproduction, and so far our gibbons are doing great. They remain a closely bonded pair, are completely self-reliant and now the latest addition to their family is another sign that they have settled into their new home!

The reintroduction of gibbons and the birth of this baby gibbon in particular is an exciting and vital step towards the conservation of this endangered species. With less than 35,000 individuals left in the wild, gibbon populations are plummeting due to hunting and habitat fragmentation. With approval from the Forestry Administration and the Apsara Authority that manages the World Heritage site, we are now in the process of releasing a second pair of gibbons into the forest. In July 2014, Bayon and Tevy were transferred to their release enclosure in Angkor Thom, where they are acclimating to their new surroundings. Once they are ready, their enclosure will be opened and these gibbons will also be free to roam the forest.

This reintroduction program at the Angkor Archaeological Park is the first of its kind in Cambodia, and we are thrilled with the results so far. Help us continue to rebuild gibbon populations in Asia, release other endangered animals and be at the forefront of conservation and wildlife protection!

Mom towards the end of her 7 month pregnancy
Mom towards the end of her 7 month pregnancy
Baby at 4 months - growing more independent!
Baby at 4 months - growing more independent!
Dad, ever watchful of the little family!
Dad, ever watchful of the little family!

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