Wildlife Alliance

Wildlife Alliance is the leader in direct protection to forests and wildlife in the Southeast Asian tropical belt. Our mission is to combat deforestation, extinction, climate change, and poverty by partnering with local communities and governments.
Oct 21, 2014

WRRT Raids Major Trafficking Ring (Graphic Images)

Confiscated Endangered Animal Parts
Confiscated Endangered Animal Parts

On October 7, 2014, the Wildlife Rapid Rescue Team (WRRT) busted a prominent wildlife trader in Phnom Penh, and discovered a staggering amount of valuable wildlife products. After receiving intelligence through our informant network, the team worked tirelessly through the night to conduct the investigation and document evidence in order to execute one of the largest raids in recent years. Parts from extremely endangered and rare species were seized, and several live animals were rescued. Seizures included 19 clouded leopard skins, 3 leopard skins, 2 Asian golden cat skins, 6 clouded leopard paws, 10 otter skins, 2 fake tiger skins and other body parts. Many of the skins were fresh and still drying on wooden frames, indicating that the house was used as a regular transit warehouse and that freshly caught animals were being slaughtered and skinned there. The skin drying process was clean and professional, and the skins were of very good quality, all details indicating that the shipment was destined for high-end market buyers, most probably in China and Vietnam. In the back of the house, the team found 3 long-tailed macaques that were to be sold as lab animals for medical experimentation in Vietnam, and rare turtles including 1 Asiatic soft-shell turtle, 4 snail-eating turtles, and 1 box turtle destined to be used in soup. The villa housing these illicit goods belongs to the China Sichuan & Chongqing Chamber of Commerce in Tuol Sangke, Phnom Penh. Three Chinese nationals were found inside the house, and were interrogated by the team. The Forestry Administration officers and military police worked until midnight to finish the interrogations, document the identities of the offenders, and impose strict penalties according to the Forestry Law.

We are concerned that Cambodia is becoming a more frequent transit point for the illegal wildlife trade to China. This has been demonstrated through recent confiscations of African ivory and rhino horn seized in Cambodia at international airports and harbors on its way from Africa to Vietnam and China. In response to this crisis, the WRRT is focusing its efforts on transnational smuggling, and this successful operation is another example of the WRRT working aggressively to dismantle the illegal wildlife trade in the entire region. Help the team continue fight wildlife trafficking in the region by making a donation, or sharing our work to spread awareness!

19 Clouded Leopard Skins Found
19 Clouded Leopard Skins Found
The macaquest rescued from the villa
The macaquest rescued from the villa
Rescued turtles that will later be released
Rescued turtles that will later be released
Oct 15, 2014

Help Save the Most Trafficked Mammal in the World

The Pangolin is Listed as Critically Endangered
The Pangolin is Listed as Critically Endangered

Save a Pangolin this Bonus Day! The Sunda pangolin is a scaly mammal that eats ants and termites, hides in dense forest, and rolls into a tiny ball when scared. However, this secretive and solitary animal is also the most illegally traded mammal in the world. Hunted for their meat and scales, more than one million individuals are believed to have been trafficked in the past decade. In China and Vietnam, their meat is considered a delicacy and is sold for $350 per kg; their scales are used in traditional medicine, and can be worth up to $1,000 per kg. To tackle this escalating crisis, our rangers are working day and night, removing nets and rescuing animals. Last year alone, they removed 15,400 snares and nets, and resued 448 animals. These rangers are on the frontlines of conservation, and $3,500 will help them conduct vehicle checkpoints, remove pangolin traps, stop poachers and prevent this shy and gentle spcies from disappearing forever.

Make your gift go even further and join us on October 15th to help save this incredible animal from going extinct! Visit our micro-project Help Save the Most Trafficked Mammal in the World to see more pictures and learn more about this incredible animal!

October 15th is the final Bonus Day of the year on GlobalGiving - All donations up to $1,000 are being matched 30%!

These shy notcturnal animals have no teeth
These shy notcturnal animals have no teeth
And curl up into a ball when frightened
And curl up into a ball when frightened
Pangolins rescued from a trader
Pangolins rescued from a trader

Links:

Oct 13, 2014

Back to School

Learning about different endangered animals
Learning about different endangered animals

For many of us, fall is in full swing and students are back in school, but in Cambodia students are enjoying their summer break still. The Kouprey Express Mobile Environmental Education Unit (KE) finished up the academic year by providing forest, habitat and wildlife conservation lessons to 588 students last month. This was the first time they worked in schools in Phnom Penh as part of their expanded Memorandum of Understanding with the government. They also introduced their new wildlife and forest conservation lessons to these classrooms. These updated lessons focus on animal classification and biology; the importance of wildlife and forest conservation; threats facing wildlife; the impacts of extinction, climate change, waste; and how this all fits into the ‘bigger picture.’

The last school visit of the academic year was to Chak Tomouk elementary school in Phnom Penh, where the team worked with 213 kids. These lessons always extend beyond just the classroom in which they are working – the activities and games drew interest from other students, teachers, and even construction workers on the campus! They all stopped to watch what the students were doing and listened to the message and rescue hotline number being promoted.

Over the next couple of months, KE has been invited by several NGOs in the area to deliver their environmental lessons. The team has also been asked by the Cambodian Organization for Living and Training (COLT) to conduct teacher trainings for university students, community educators and teachers from several NGOs. This will be an incredible opportunity to spread environmental awareness while fostering the growing professional field of conservation in Cambodia. So while school may not be in session in Cambodia, the next couple of months are shaping up to be busy months for the team! Help them continue to bring about lasting environmental change in Cambodia by making a gift today, or make your gift go even further this Bonus Day on October 15!

Getting ready to enjoy their summer break
Getting ready to enjoy their summer break
 
   

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