Wildlife Alliance

Wildlife Alliance is the leader in direct protection to forests and wildlife in the Southeast Asian tropical belt. Our mission is to combat deforestation, extinction, climate change, and poverty by partnering with local communities and governments.
Aug 4, 2016

Thank you for Helping us Save Civets from the Cruel Coffee Trade!

Freedom! Rescued civet released in protected site.
Freedom! Rescued civet released in protected site.

We would like to extend a special thank you to all the amazing donors that helped fund our campaign to protect civets from the cruel coffee trade. Thanks to your generosity and kindness, this campaign will allow Wildlife Alliance to continue to rescue and protect civets.  Your support comes at a critical time, as Wildlife Programs Director, Nick Marx, noted that “The [Wildlife Rapid Rescue Team is] now finding snares created specifically to capture live civets, usually baited with pineapple.” Nick Marx and his team believe that the increased number of snares to capture civets is used to fuel the global demand for Kopi Luwak coffee. 

In addition to confiscating snares, Wildlife Alliance is continuing to dissemble trade networks, which prevents civets from being captured in the wild and results in more civets being rescued from the hands of wildlife traffickers.  Unfortunately, wild civets are being taken out of their habitat to stock civet farms due to an increased demand for the world's most expensive coffee, Kopi Luwak.  At the civet farms, these naturally solitary omnivores are kept in cages where they are exclusively fed coffee cherries. The digested coffee beans are sold as a luxury coffee, while the civets used to make the coffee fall deathly ill from stress and an unhealthy diet. Since our campaign to save these animals was launched, Wildlife Alliance has rescued multiple civets from wildlife traders.

In one case, after many hours of surveillance, the Wildlife Rapid Rescue Team was able to raid the home and arrest a major wildlife trader.  During the raid, the team rescued alive civet being kept in a small crate and five live Bengal monitors.  They also seized two dead wild pigs and six dead muntjacs.  The raid was a major success, not only because animals were rescued, but also because a prominent wildlife trader was arrested, fined and is facing wildlife trading charges.  By stopping a major wildlife trader, countless civets and other animals will be safer in the wild.  The following day after the raid, the Wildlife Rapid Rescue Team released the rescued civet into its natural habitat in a protected area in the Koh Nhek district. There, the civet will get a second chance to live a life in the wild, free from poachers and the Kopi Luwak industry.

Thank you again for your generous donation and for helping us spread the word the cruel business of Kopi Luwak coffee.  Wildlife Alliance has rescued over 200 civets to date, but the demand for these animals is not slowing down. You can continue to help by spreading awareness about the inhumane nature of “civet poop” coffee on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.  You can also help by supporting the Wildlife Rapid Rescue Team, the men on the ground fighting for civets.

Longing for a life in the wild.
Longing for a life in the wild.

Links:

Jul 28, 2016

Second Baby Gibbon Born at Angkor!

Newborn gibbon hangs onto Mom
Newborn gibbon hangs onto Mom

Although Cambodia has been facing a severe drought and there has not been rain for months in Angkor, the animals Wildlife Alliance released in the historic temple complex seem to be thriving.  We are excited to announce that Bayon and Tevy, the second pair of pileated gibbons released at Angkor, have recently had a baby!  This news brought relief to our staff who were initially worried that the two gibbons would not stay as a pair in the wild. The male, Bayon, would often explore the forest, leaving the more cautious Tevy near their release site and feeding station.  In recent months, Tevy has joined Bayon in exploring the forest and the two are rarely seen independently of one another.  The newest gibbon born in Angkor is wonderful news for both the project and for the long term survival of this endangered species.

The first pair of gibbons, Baray and Saranick, and their baby, Spider, continue to do well.  Spider is growing up quickly and is becoming very confident at swinging among the branches. Baray has settled in to his role as a father perfectly and is defensive of his family, becoming agitated when our staff monitors the trio for what he feels is too long. 

The sivered langurs that were released in Angkor in late 2014 are also doing well, but still rely on supplemental feeding that Wildlife Alliance provides for them to ensure their survival in the wild. We have also released a male muntjac to accompany the female who was previously brought to Angkor.  The muntjac pair is currently in an enclosure but show signs that they may be ready for release soon because they are wary of their handlers, even though the female was hand raised at Phnom Tamao Wildlife Rescue Center (PTWRC).

Thank you for your support of our efforts to rewild the historic temple complex of Angkor! This project not only brings life back to a protected forest, but also gives endangered gibbins and other rescued animals a second chance at life in the wild. 

Family time for Baray, Saranick, and Spider
Family time for Baray, Saranick, and Spider
Langur hanging out near his release site in Angkor
Langur hanging out near his release site in Angkor

Links:

Jul 28, 2016

Modern Sustainable Farming Implemented at Sovanna Baitong

Empowering the next generation to live sustainably
Empowering the next generation to live sustainably

Wildlife Alliance continues to introduce innovative sustainable farming techniques to our Community Agriculture Development Project. The program aims to empower Cambodians to earn a livable and sustainable income so that they don't have to rely on slash and burn farming and wildlife poaching, practices that are detrimental to the forest.  The Community Agriculture Development Project does this through training in modern agriculture techniques and marketing, and provides farmers with subsidized tools, irrigation and seedlings. Recently, the program has introduced farmers to a technique that is self sustaining, cost effective, and is made of recycled materials- aquaponics.

Aquaponics is the practice of combining  aquatic animal farming and hydroponics in a symbiotic environment. It creates a a symbiotic ecosystem where the fish feed on the plants and then the fish’s excrement is used as nutrients to fertilize the plants. This creates a closed ecosystem, where the fish essentially feed themselves and do not require supplemental food. Additionally, the majority of the water in the aquaponics systems is recycled, making it even more sustainable and cost effective. 

At Sovanna Baitong, community members have been consistently producing gallic, basilica, eggplants, sweet pepper, and fish in the aquaponics systems.  The families not only use their aquaponics harvests for self-consumption, but can also sell their products at the local market.  To produce the best agriculture, Wildlife Alliance has also taught families to create their own organic fertilizer through worm composting and composting grass and cow manure, and making a dry compost.

Your contributions allow us to bring these innovative techniques to rural communities. We hope you continue to support Wildlife Alliance in creating sustainable livlihoods in Cambodia! 

Successful aquaponics ecosystem
Successful aquaponics ecosystem
Aquaponics system made from recycled materials
Aquaponics system made from recycled materials
 
   

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