Feb 26, 2021

Moving Forward

Docente workshop
Docente workshop

In the midst of a pandemic that has touched every corner of the earth, the remote, high-altitude communities of the Sacred Valley have not been spared. It is more important than ever to have trained and trusted health promotion specialists in these communities.

Sacred Valley Health partners with 15 remote communities and uses a train-the-trainer model to develop local professionals to train and help create a network of community health workers (CHWs) in a program called the Docente Program. In this program, SVH brings up current CHWs and trains and employs them to become docentes (Spanish for teacher) to help implement programming as the trainers, mentors, and supervisors of community health workers.

To kick-start the professional development process for docentes, we host a 5-day intensive leadership workshop. Despite the pandemic, we were still able to host a successful workshop for docentes while following very strict health and safety protocols. These measures not only kept docentes and staff safe but also provided a model for docentes on how to maintain healthy environments, lessons they can take to their communities and teach to CHWs.

The first week of February we hosted 8 docentes; six that will be program trainers for our fundamental CHW training and two that will be program trainers for a new advanced CHW community project based training. During the week, the docentes reinforced their knowledge of the organization, reviewed their job responsibilities as docentes, learned characteristics of a successful docente, and practiced completing work documentation forms and paperwork. Docentes participated in hands-on activities to learn and practice various teaching and learning techniques, mentorship skills, and public speaking. This leadership retreat was also an opportunity for inter-community bonding while having fun and growing personally and professionally.

Evaluation of the leadership workshop this year was more comprehensive than in previous years. It provided local program staff with opportunities to learn more about the evaluation process as they developed and led their own evaluation with guidance from the M&E Director. In previous years, evaluation activities of the docente leadership workshop were primarily based on their knowledge gained, with pre- and post- quizzes. This year, we not only measured knowledge transfer but also evaluated each individual's skill level in 3 specific areas taught during the week: completing work documentation forms, teaching, and public speaking. Each docente now has a more detailed evaluation so we can create individualized plans based on needs and strengths.

The other area of evaluation we added to the workshop this year was a self-evaluation by program staff. The staff that planned and implemented the workshop engaged in qualitative evaluation of the workshop - celebrating success, evaluating challenges, and identifying areas for improvement. This will inform planning not only for future docente workshops, but other programs and trainings as well.

With your donation we can continue to provide these indigenous women from underserved communities with consistent means of employment, education, and empowerment. In turn, this ensures our partner communities have access to knowledgeable health workers at a time when they need it most. 

Docente workshop
Docente workshop
Docente workshop
Docente workshop
Docente workshop
Docente workshop

Links:

May 29, 2020

Final Assessment

March 15th, 2020, nine days after Peru’s first confirmed case of COVID-19, the Peruvian government sprang into action, swiftly implementing a comprehensive country-wide quarantine. As of now, Peru’s quarantine will last until June 30th. During this time, the SVH office is closed and training programs are paused. As staff work independently from home, the evaluation of the Adolescent Girls Empowerment Initiative has been completed. Our evaluations have shown how much the participants learned, the personal impact, and how we did planning and implementing the pilot.

With each training, the participants did a pre- and post- knowledge quiz. The average rate of knowledge gain over the pilot was 80%, with the younger group (12 and 13-year olds) gaining more knowledge than the older group of girls (14 – 16 year olds). The difference in knowledge gained was attributed to the differences in lessons among the two groups. The lessons in the older group were based more on facts in topics such as reproduction, sexually transmitted infections, and family planning. This required learning new words, scientific facts, and the ability to memorize new concepts. Also, many of the older girls had some knowledge in these topics, making the pre- and post- quiz scores similar. The younger group’s content focused more on interpersonal and behavioral topics, concepts that have some flexibility in them as people, relationships, and situations are different. Another important piece of data from the program is 100%, every girl that started the program completed it!

We also completed focus groups and observations. With this, we learned about how the participants experienced the program, what was successful and what they felt needed changed for the full program. Feedback was overwhelmingly positive: participants said their peers are interested in being in the program;, they suggested several new topics that would easily fold into the existing curriculum; the participants believed every topic taught was valuable; and lastly, participants said that the program is important to help girls learn about their own development, how to care for themselves, and to gain confidence.

Unfortunately, because of the pandemic, planning for the full program has paused indefinitely. Thank you so much for following the AGEI Program. SVH is grateful for all of the support that made the AGEI pilot program possible. When SVH operations can resume, we hope to reach even more girls with a well-crafted full program. While the global health crisis has shifted timelines, your donation will help make sure the full AGEI program will happen!

Feb 3, 2020

Big City Field Trip & Graduation Celebration

Graduation Photo
Graduation Photo

All of the AGEI participants buzzed giddily with excitement on the final Saturday morning of the program. Everyone was excited for what would be - for almost all of them - their first trip to the city of Cusco. After some quick wrap-up activities, staff and participants piled into two vans to make the 1.5-hour drive from Ollantaytambo to Cusco. 

The first stop on the big city tour was the Universidad Nacional de Arte Diego Quispe Tito del Cusco, a fine arts college. Participants were met by a professor who explained areas of study, encouraged the girls to apply through the placement program for students from communities in the region, and led a tour of the school to include one of the painting workshops. Next AGEIers walked through the Plaza de Armas, down the cobbled streets of the Incan Empire capital city, and made their way to Qoricancha, a temple at the city center that was very important for Incan religious ceremonies. Participants visited the small museum that lies beneath the grounds of Qoricancha, learning about the construction of the temple and its primary use before the Spanish Conquistadors built the Santo Domingo Church directly on top of much of the site. 

With all of this walking and learning, everyone had worked up an appetite! So, after a quick lunch of pollo a la brasa and chicha morada, the final Cusco stop was the mall shopping center! Participants rode the elevator and escalator for the first time, and got to experience the joyous confusion of bumper cars at the arcade. What better way to get out of the post-meal, afternoon slump?! The group, feeling rejuvenated, piled back into the vans to head back for their graduation celebration.

The route back to The Sacred Valley included two important stops. First, Puka Pukara, an archaeological site said to be the Gateway to The Sacred Valley, and the starting point of a system of tunnels created during the Incan Empire, which run from Cusco to various settlements in The Valley. Next, a stop at a beautiful vista point overlooking the town of Pisac and the road that winds down The Valley toward Ollantaytambo. And the final stop: picking up the cake before arriving at the home of SVH’s Director of Operations, Ana, for the graduation and sleepover fiesta!

After snacks and more chicha morada (Escolástica’s special recipe), program staff congratulated and thanked all of the girls for their participation in the AGEI pilot program. Each participant was individually recognized with a certificate and Ayni Wasi goody bag, and were asked to say something about their experience. The responses were overwhelmingly positive, ranging from being grateful to take part in the program, to saying the program will be beneficial to other adolescent girls in their communities whom they hope to educate themselves. (Given that SVH’s core programs operate using a train-the-trainer framework, staff are very excited about the prospect of the AGEI adopting the same format!). The night ended with cake, music, and dancing.

Thank you so much for following the AGEI Pilot Program journey! SVH is grateful for all of the support and donations that made the AGEI pilot program possible and now we are seeking funding to launch a full scale program. Program staff witnessed growth and character building in just a few short weeks with participants, and SVH hopes to reach even more adolescent girls with the launch of a formal program. Staff will be analyzing all data collected to inform a scaled-up AGEI program to be launched in 2020. Please consider making a donation to support the launch of our formal AGEI program!

Graduation Celebration
Graduation Celebration
Cusco Group Photo
Cusco Group Photo
University Visit
University Visit
University Tour
University Tour
Cusco Overlook
Cusco Overlook
 
WARNING: Javascript is currently disabled or is not available in your browser. GlobalGiving makes extensive use of Javascript and will not function properly with Javascript disabled. Please enable Javascript and refresh this page.