Apply to Join
Feb 16, 2017

Report 8 20522

1 Alex.JPG
1 Alex.JPG

Alex was 14 months old when he was admitted to Nafasi Welfare Home in July 2015. He was abandoned by his mother whose whereabouts are still unknown. He was referred by local community leaders who had found him. He was very neglected and critically sick. Alex received emergency medical care and gradually recovered and started to grow.  Regaining his strength he quickly learned to walk and started to play and thrive.

The community volunteers were eventually able to find Alex’s father after making protracted and painstaking investigations. His father is a petty trader working almost 18 hours a day and does not have enough time to take care of his child.

Alex will stay with his paternal grandfather nearby his father.The Nafasi Community Support Programme will liaise with the probation officers and local community support staff to monitor his progress and provide any appropriate support.

The family will be supplied with a mattress, sheets, blankets, clothing and a small food package.

Alex was resettled with his father on 11th January 2017.

PATIENCE             

Patience was only 6 days old when she was admitted to Nafasi Welfare Home on 4/11/2014. 

Patience’s mother was just 14 years old when she accidently  got pregnant . Her mother on hearing that her daughter was pregnant disowned her and stopped her school fees and she consequently had to leave school. 

She has one sister who was 24 years old and working at a hair salon. She secretly took Marion in but it was an unsafe environment for baby Patience so Nafasi took her in.

In the proceeding years Patience has grown into a lovely little girl with a strong will and determination.

 Efforts to re-unite her with her Grandmother failed as she often left the country without warning, to find work in as a housekeeper.

Nafasi encouraged Marion to visit Patience weekly. She walked for one and a half hours in the scorching sun to visit her daughter. They have built up a strong bond. Marion took part in Nafasi’s Community Support Programme (NCSP) and was a faithful attender and diligent student. She has been supported, counselled and trained to be a hairdresser. We have carefully taken our time but now believe take both mother and daughter are ready and strong enough to be re-united. With the help of a strong support system we are confident that this reunification will be successful. The NCSP team continues to follow up and support these young girls as they start out together on the next step in their lives.

At the end of October last year the big day finally arrived for Patience and her mother Marion could take her home!

Nafasi means chance.

Thanks to your help and support Nafasi Welfare Home can provide loving care and protection to vulnerable children like Alex and Patience and support their young parents or guardians. Giving them a new chance in life.

Regrettably not every child’s new chance turns out so well. In our last report, Abandoned at just 4 days old - Mercy's New Chance, we shared the story of one of the babies in our care. Tragically little Mercy caught an infection and was too weak to survive. She  died in hospital, just before Christmas,  in the arms of one of the Nafasi staff.  Nafasi cares for  “vulnerable” young children.  Mercy’s short life has really brought home to us just how vulnerable these children really are. 

Thanks to your contributions and the efforts of the Nafasi staff we are very proud to say that we have once again attained superstar rating and been awarded this Top-Ranked rosette! This means that Nafasi will get more publicity on the GlobalGiving website.

GlobalGiving believes that every girl deserves a chance to realize her full potential. For this reason GlobalGiving have set up The Girl Fund to provide ongoing support to projects, like Nafasi, who are dedicated to helping women and girls around the world thrive.

This Girl Fund is hosting a special  Campaign running from March 1 - March 15 to coincide with International Women’s Dayon Wednesday, March 8th 2017. On this day, 8/3there is  bonus day during which donations will be matched at 30% until funds run out.

Please look on www.facebook.com/nafasiwelfarehome  for more information.

Your support will mean that  Nafasi  can continue to provide ongoing support for girls like Marion and Patience. 

Thank you for taking time read this report and thanks you again for your support

 Thank you very much on behalf of these In the words of Nelson Mandela: “It always seems impossible until it’s done.” 

2 Alex.jpg
2 Alex.jpg
3 Alex  Mr Cool.jpg
3 Alex Mr Cool.jpg
4 Alex  in the corridor.jpg
4 Alex in the corridor.jpg
5 Alex with his father.jpg
5 Alex with his father.jpg
6 Alex.jpg
6 Alex.jpg
7 Patience.jpg
7 Patience.jpg
8 Patience  Mother and aunty by their hairdressing shop.jpg
8 Patience Mother and aunty by their hairdressing shop.jpg
9 Patience trampoline.jpg
9 Patience trampoline.jpg
10 Patience.jpg
10 Patience.jpg
11 Patience with her mother at the farewel party.jpg
11 Patience with her mother at the farewel party.jpg
12 Patience  at home.jpg
12 Patience at home.jpg
13 Top ranked rosette.png
13 Top ranked rosette.png
14 How wonderful - Anne Frank.jpg
14 How wonderful - Anne Frank.jpg
Nov 23, 2016

Abandoned at just 4 days old - Mercy's New Chance

Mercy
Mercy

Disowned and discarded at just 4 days old.

Her 15 year old mother was raped by her step brother and sent to the city, Kampala, so that her pregnancy could be kept from prying eyes so that the family name would not be dishonoured. Incest is still taboo in many parts of Africa. She found help at a crisis centre for pregnant teenagers and gave birth to a beautiful little girl she called “Mercy”. She put her in a babygrow on which she had written the words;  "I love you my baby from Mom, You are precious to me".

Mercy in her babygrow. Mercy at the clinic

Four days later her own mother and grandmother turned up unexpectedly and forced her to return to the village without her daughter. She was forced to leave her tiny baby behind. The cruel words “you must forget about her, she never happened, you may never see her again’, must have rung in her ears as she was remembered the words she had written not knowing that these would be her parting words.

Jackie, manager at Nafasi was contacted by Wakisa crisis centre minutes after they discovered Mercy alone in her cot. Jackie immediately agreed to accept Mercy and made the necessary preparations for admitting such a small young baby. On arrival we took her straight to a clinic for medical checks and her vaccinations. She was laid in warm Moses basket and received individual loving care according to a care plan written by a qualified neonatal nurse. She was in good health but very small weighing just 2.5 kilograms, 5lb 8oz.

Mercy gets a bottle. Mercy getting a bottle.

Thanks to the dedication of the Nafasi staff who have fed her round the clock for the last 4weeks, Mercy is now gaining weight and thriving. Jackie, together with social workers from Wakisa and probation officers will try to find her mother to see if reunification with her biological family will be possible in the future but this is very doubtful. In the meantime we are looking for a foster family to nurture and love her.

Mercy safe in her cot.  Mercy 2 weeks old in her new cot.

October 28th 2016, the day of the removal from old to new!

  • 28/11/15  = Clearing of land & digging foundations.
  •   1/02/16  = Construction of walls & roof. 
  •   1/09/16  = Start interior painting, plumbing and wiring.
  • 28/10/16  = Removal day!

 Removal begins. Removal day!

Only the gardens need finishing. Only the gardens need completing.

Thanks to specific donations we have been able to build this wonderful new building for the abandoned babies in Uganda. Thanks to your help we have been able to equip it with new mattresses,  sheets, blankets, towels, playing mats, sofa cushions, cups, beakers, plates, bibs etc. Our staff were really amazed when they moved into the new building, saying what an improvement it will make to the standards of the care, health and wellbeing of the young and tender babies, greatly improving their home environment.

Meal time in the new dining room. Meal time in the new dining room.

David in his new bedroom. David happy in his new bedroom.

We need your help to keep our project running so that we can reach out to help more destitute babies, and through our Community Support Programme to continue to provide training and counselling for our teenage mothers helping them through their crisis.

In the next report we will tell you more about how the move and our plans for the future.

Global Giving are hosting a Christmas Giving Campaign: 50% match

  

Donations on GlobalGiving.co.uk will be matched by 50%. This campaign is kicking off on Giving Tuesday, 29th November, and ending on 31st December. By joining us during this campaign you can contribute to helping us raise a toast for a successful New Year for all at Nafasi Welfare Home.

Please look out for the flyer we will be circulating soon this Christmas Campaign on our Facebook page. www.facebook.com/nafasiwelfarehome and share it with your friends about it, friends or contacts in the US? We are also on Globalgiving.org

You can help us by increasing awareness about the work Nafasi is doing helping vulnerable babies in Uganda by sharing our GlobalGiving Project Page: www.globalgiving.co.uk/20522 or website and: www.nafasiwelfarehome.org/en/ with your family, friends and contacts.

Support us with regular donations from as little as £5 a month.

We are extremely thankful of all the support we have already received from all our supporters rs and especially our GlobalGiving friends. Thanks to people like you we can carry on this vital work of caring for the  vulnerable babies and young children in Uganda.

May we take this opportunity to wish you, our readers, a very Happy Christmas and a peaceful and joyous 2017.

Thank you for taking time read this report and thanks you again for your support.

In the words of Nelson Mandela: “It always seems impossible until it’s done.”

    

Mercy in her babygrow.
Mercy in her babygrow.
Mercy gets a bottle.
Mercy gets a bottle.
Mercy safe in her cot.
Mercy safe in her cot.
Removal begins.
Removal begins.
Only the gardens need finishing.
Only the gardens need finishing.
Meal time in the new dining room.
Meal time in the new dining room.
David in his new bedroom.
David in his new bedroom.
Aug 26, 2016

Chance for students to write their thesis.

In January 2016 Maartje and Paula stayed at Nafasi Welfare Home (NWH) for three months.

During this time they wrote their bachelor thesis “ Moving beyond basic care, Interventions on caregivers’ interactions and the social development of children at Nafasi Welfare Home, ” concerning the social development of the children at Nafasi and the quality of the care given by NWH. They have written the following report for us and we are very proud to say that they have now graduated and received a mark of 9.2 out of 10 for the research done at Nafasi!

It was clear to see that the Ugandan staff and management wanted to give a home to children who are abandoned by their biological family. Day and night there is a team of dedicated caregivers available who are responsible for the care of the children. Child abandonment is a massive problem in Uganda and therefore Nafasi Welfare Home (NWH) intervenes by taking care of a number of these children who are in urgent need of a home, shelter, care, food, warmth and the feeling of being wanted and loved. Besides the daily care of the children Nafasi’s Community Support Programme team works to reunite children with a member of their biological family or if this is deemed to be impossible, due to many far reaching circumstances, they will search for another solution to the crisis this often being a foster family. By doing this NWH wants to give the children and their family hope for their future and a new chance in life.

During our stay nine children aged 0 – 3 years were resident at NWH. Each child has their own specific story, challenges and abilities but with one common denominator: they are all traumatized because they have been separated from their parents and family. This is visible in their development and behaviour for example: A two year old boy appeared to be very afraid of men since he had been mistreated by his own father. A one and a half year old girl has difficulties making contact with new people because she was frightened of strangers. When the children were left alone for a very short period they started to scream with fear of being abandoned and left behind again.

Our research underlined the importance that the children are provided with a safe environment and adequate level of care in order to develop and reach their milestones. Our conclusion is therefore that the work of NWH is very vital and needs to be stimulated and continued so that children have the possibility to receive care in a positive, safe and stimulating environment that enables them to be reintegrated into the community so that they can eventually lead normal lives.

Chance for some extra funding coming up in October… Your support is so valuable!

Global Giving Little by Little by Little Campaign = 50% Match on all donations under £50

From 25th October - 1st November 2016

Please note the dates in your diary.

 

Please help our project even more by sharing the Nafasi story our GlobalGiving Project Page, Website and Facebook Page with your family, friends and contacts.

Better still become a regular donor from as little as £5 a month.

We are very grateful for all the support we have already been given from all our donors and especially our GlobalGiving friends. Thanks to you we can carry on this vital work of caring for the vulnerable babies and young children in Uganda.

In the words of Nelson Mandela: “It always seems impossible until it’s done.”

Thank you again for your support.

Kind regards from Jill and the Nafasi Team

  

For more information go to:  www.globalgiving.co.uk/20522 or https://goto.gg/20522

 www.nafasiwelfarehome.org/en/   www.facebook.com/nafasiwelfarehome

or send an email to kha.jcvanleeuwen@gmail.com

Links:

 
WARNING: Javascript is currently disabled or is not available in your browser. GlobalGiving makes extensive use of Javascript and will not function properly with Javascript disabled. Please enable Javascript and refresh this page.