Mar 12, 2021

The current need is frightening

Diakonie Katastrophenhilfe
Diakonie Katastrophenhilfe

 

It is the biggest humanitarian crisis in the world: The conflict in Yemen, which has been ongoing since 2015, has plunged the country into immeasurable hardship. Out of a population of 30.5 million, more than 24 million are dependent on humanitarian aid - that's 80 percent of the population.

 

Shabwa: Help for more than 50,000 people

In the administrative district of Shabwa, too, the need is great. Almost half of the population has neither a water supply nor access to sanitary facilities, and many suffer from hunger. Together with its partner organization Yemen Family Care Association (YFCA), Diakonie Katastrophenhilfe is rehabilitating five drinking water facilities and repairing the associated pipes. 1,500 families receive vouchers for water containers so that they can transport clean water to their homes.

In addition, water filters are distributed and local water committees are trained to monitor water quality and maintain the technical facilities. In addition, hygiene kits are distributed, particularly needy families are provided with their own latrine and volunteers are trained as hygiene advisors.

To improve the food situation in the project area, 900 families participate in a cash-for-work program, and another 300 families receive cash assistance to cover their food needs. A total of 52,500 people benefit from the project, which was implemented with the support of the German Federal Foreign Office.

Donor conference for civil war country: "The current need is frightening".

With a donor conference for Yemen, the United Nations wants to collect donations today to alleviate the current famine as much as possible. Michael Frischmuth, continental director for Asia at Diakonie Katastrophenhilfe, commented:

 "The acute need in Yemen is frightening and deeply concerns us. According to the United Nations, the number of malnourished children could rise by more than 20 percent over the course of the year compared to the previous year - 400,000 children are at risk of starvation. We expect the international community to make substantial commitments today to ensure the survival of hundreds of thousands of people in Yemen. Last year, donor countries provided only about half of the funding requested by the UN. This mismatch between need and aid must not be repeated under any circumstances."

This is why your support is absolutely required. Please donate so that we can continue our relief measuresr in Yemen.

 

Thank you so much

Yours

Michael Tuerk

Mar 12, 2021

10 Years of the Syrian Conflict: A Sad Anniversary

Diakonie Katastrophenhilfe
Diakonie Katastrophenhilfe

The war in Syria has caused unimaginable suffering since 2011. It is one of the greatest refugee disasters of our time. The escalation of violence in northern Syria since October 2019 has further exacerbated the humanitarian plight of the population: millions of people have been displaced from their homes and urgently need humanitarian assistance. They are seeking protection in Syria and neighboring Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon and Turkey. We have been active in the region for years and are standing by the people. Even now, when the novel coronavirus will further exacerbate the situation of many millions of refugees.

The vast majority of people in Syria depend on humanitarian aid to survive. Eight out of ten Syrians live below the poverty line. Hunger in Syria - fueled by an economic crisis and massive inflation - has increased significantly over the past year, with an additional 4.5 million people lacking regular access to nutritious food compared to 2019 - a total of more than 12 million people. "Our partners tell us that the poorest families have been reducing their daily meals for a long time," reports Martin Keßler, head of Diakonie Katastrophenhilfe. "Hundreds of thousands of children are malnourished - with devastating consequences for their physical and mental development."

With more than six million people still fleeing far from their homes inside Syria, the relief agency has successively shifted the focus of its work to these people over the course of the war. "Last year, 20 percent more people were in need of protective shelter than in 2019," Keßler says. "That encourages us to continue on our path: We need to repair and renovate destroyed homes so that displaced families who previously had to live in ruined buildings, for example, can find a safe home again."
Syria is struggling with several crises at the same time: acts of war, a completely destroyed infrastructure, the consequences of the Corona pandemic and an economic crisis - partly exacerbated by international sanctions - are giving people a hard time and robbing them of even their last savings. "Many people can afford neither warm clothes nor heating oil," says Keßler.

In order to stand by those affected and provide vital aid in Syria, we rely on your support. We are there for the people, even if the disaster receives little or no media attention.

Please support us with your donation. This help us to help on the ground and saving lives.

Thank you so much

 

Yours

Michael Tuerk

Feb 1, 2021

Emergency aid locust plague

APDA/Diakonie Katastrophenhilfe
APDA/Diakonie Katastrophenhilfe

The Eli Daar project region in Afar is affected by one of the worst desert locust invasions in the last 25 years. More and more people are losing their livelihoods and suffering from hunger. The locust swarms not only lead to crop losses, but also to the large-scale destruction of pasture land. Together with our partners, we are helping to mitigate the effects of the drought and establish food security for those affected

 

Together with partner organization APDA, the project aims to mitigate the impact of drought and locust invasion on the food security of families in Eli Daar. To ensure the survival of livestock, 2,916 households are provided with alfalfa hay. In addition, families will receive veterinary medicines and veterinarians will conduct six 15-day treatment campaigns. Beneficiary households have a maximum of 15 goats to ensure their survival. The hay is also expected to increase milk production by about 10 percent.
The provision of animal feed and medical treatment is expected to protect the lives of the herds and thus the livelihoods of more than 2,900 households and about 35,000 animals.

 

Thank you so much for your engagement!

 

Yours Michael tuerk

 
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