Mar 5, 2019

#HerStepsCount Challenge - IWD2019

Happy March from Generations For Peace! We have two exciting updates to share with you:

1) Generations For Peace Earns #29 Ranking in the 2019 Top 500 NGOs in the World

Generations For Peace is now ranked as #29 in the "Top 500 NGOs in the World" by Geneva-based NGO Advisor! We're also the #2 anti-violence and #3 peacebuilding organization in the world. This is important global recognition for the extraordinary efforts and achievements of our GFP volunteers around the world, striving for positive change in very difficult contexts. And it’s a huge credit to all the donors and partners who support us. You can read the full press release here.

2) Introducing the #HerStepsCount Challenge in honor of International Women's Day

In honor of International Women’s Day on March 8th, join Generations For Peace as we compete for one of four spots in GlobalGiving’s 2019 Girl Fund. By supporting our #HerStepsCount campaign between today and March 14th, you will be providing women and girls globally with resources to build peace in their local communities through GFP programs. Plus, funds we raise together during this period will be eligible for bonuses from GlobalGiving to enable us to do even more!

To spread the word, we call on you to participate in our #HerStepsCount challenge: take a video of yourself taking 5 steps then upload to your social media channels using the hashtag #HerStepsCount. Donate $10 to the campaign and then call on 5 friends to participate in the challenge, as well. When sharing, please consider doing so with people who are new to Generations For Peace, so we spread the message of women and girls in peacebuilding far and wide.

Thank you in advance for your contribution! Your donations will help us empower more women with the skills they need to become leaders in their local communities and pass on a more peaceful world to future generations. #PassItOn

Links:

Dec 20, 2018

Project Update 3

Lama Climbing Mount Elbrus
Lama Climbing Mount Elbrus

Having climbed Nepal’s Mount Lobuche and Russia’s Mount Elbrus – two of the world’s tallest and most difficult mountains – in 2018, Lama is continuing in 2019 to draw attention to the fact that women are not only capable but also willing to face any challenge, no matter the nature. In order to highlight this, she is now looking to be the first Middle Eastern woman to summit Everest, the world’s tallest peak. 

Building peace is a challenge that we face globally and locally every day. However, when everyone – men and women, alike – is given the opportunity to contribute, engage, and lead with their own skills, in their own communities, by their own passions, that challenge can be overcome. However, when we draw lines of division between us, quieting those who have the potential to lend a hand to the peacebuilding process, we hinder the progress and limit the ways in which conflict can be transformed in scales large and small around the world.

Women are too often quieted – forced into the outer edges of the peacebuilding conversation. Friends of Europe earlier this year shared statistics regarding Women, Peace, and Security, which revealed the still minimal role women play in peacebuilding on a global scale. As of June 2016, only 22% of national parliamentarians are women; from 2008 to 2012, women were signatories in only 2 of the 61 peace agreements; and between 1990 and 2010, only 92 of almost 600 peace agreements even referenced women.

As an integral leader of an international peacebuilding organisation based in Jordan, Lama knows first-hand that women play a vital role in efforts to build lasting peace on both global and local levels. In fact, when women are included in peacebuilding processes, there is a 20% increase in the probability of an agreement lasting at least 2 years, and a 35% increase in the probability of an agreement lasting at least 15 years. So why aren’t they consistently more central to the conversation?

In continuing her efforts to promote women’s roles in peacebuilding through highlighting the challenges they are able to overcome, Lama will set out to climb Everest in Spring 2019. 

Her Steps Count for Every Woman
Her Steps Count for Every Woman
Sep 28, 2018

Project Update 2

Four months after climbing Nepal’s Mount Lobuche, Lama has now summited Russia’s Mount Elbrus – Europe’s highest and the world’s tenth-highest peak. With two of the world’s tallest and most difficult mountains under her belt, Lama is continuing to draw attention to the fact that women are not only capable, but also willing, to face any challenge, no matter the nature.

Building peace is a challenge that we face globally and locally every day. However, when everyone – men and women, alike – is given the opportunity to contribute, engage, and lead with their own skills, in their own communities, by their own passions, that challenge can be overcome. However, when we draw lines of division between us, quieting those who have the potential to lend a hand to the peacebuilding process, we hinder the progress and limit the ways in which conflict can be transformed in scales large and small around the world.

Women are too often quieted – forced into the outer edges of the peacebuilding conversation. Friends of Europe earlier this year shared statistics regarding Women, Peace, and Security, which revealed the still minimal role women play in peacebuilding on a global scale. As of June 2016, only 22% of national parliamentarians are women; from 2008 to 2012, women were signatories in only 2 of the 61 peace agreements; and between 1990 and 2010, only 92 of almost 600 peace agreements even referenced women.

As an integral leader of an international peace-building organisation based in Jordan, Lama knows first-hand that women play a vital role in efforts to build lasting peace on both global and local levels. In fact, when women are included in peacebuilding processes, there is a 20% increase in the probability of an agreement lasting at least 2 years, and a 35% increase in the probability of an agreement lasting at least 15 years. So why aren’t they consistently more central to the conversation?

In continuing her efforts to promote women’s roles in peacebuilding through highlighting the challenges they are able to overcome, Lama has now set her eyes on Everest, the world’s tallest mountain, which she is preparing to climb in 2019.

 
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