Jan 27, 2017

Memories and Love.

PureHeart Sekar ("cow eyes"). Dispenser of love.
PureHeart Sekar ("cow eyes"). Dispenser of love.

Namaste' dear People,

I wasn't going to write a report for several weeks, but came across a beautiful story from a number of years ago and wanted to share it with you. If there's any one word that describes our Work, it's HEART. And in this report I want to give you a sense of it. Om Namah Shivaya.

The story is about a gentle, gentle cow named Lakshmi whom we came to love. The story, below, was written at that time.

============================

Sunday, January 10th...

Yesterday we buried our beloved Lakshmi.

We had rescued her from slaughter in a James Bond-like action drama almost two short years ago. She was missing part of her rear leg (just below the knee). She had been hit by a truck and Dr. Raja had lovingly nursed her back to health--every three days completely changing her bandage/cast--warding off infection, encouraging healing.

We had found a lovely home for her outside of town on Hari's estate where we were intending to place her. But during the healing process, which took six months, we had come to love her...Her gentle nature...Her sattvic presence...Moving here and there around the Shelter garden...Giving us her darshan...And so...she was happy and content with us, and we decided to keep her.

After 1 1/2 years, she became weak and unable to garner enough strength to stand up. It was on a Friday. We contacted the one government veterinarian who was expert in large animals. He was in meetings all day and was unable to come on Friday. Dr. Raja arranged to meet him at the Shelter 7:30 Saturday morning.

It was geting cool here at night, and we were concerned about her. In the evening, Dr. Raja had Prakash enclose her entire "resting area" with plastic to ward off any breeze and cold air--and made a bed for her of straw covered with a blanket. Our Staff picked her up and put her on it. (She was lying on her side). Late evening we were still concerned. Vishwa and I scanned the shops in town before they closed. We bought two extra "space heaters", and five wool blankets.

She was comfortable. Prakash gave her a lot of attention and love during the night. But she quietly left her body around 4:30am. We don't know why. She expired before the large animal expert had a chance to examine her.

Vishwa arranged for a beautiful burial. Her body was put on a flatbed bullock cart. It was adorned with vibhuti (sacred ash) and cum-cum, and totally covered with yellow, blue and red flowers. Four photos: Two of Bhagavan Ramana Maharshi (one with him and his beloved cow, Lakshmi; another with Jackie the dog), a photo of Satya Sai Baba, and a print of Chenrizig (an aspect of Avalokateshwara, the Tibetan Buddhist bodhisattva of compassion). There was a large yellow garland (six inches in diameter) encircling most of her body. She actually looked beautiful and peaceful.

Eight of us followed the bullock cart, on foot, as we slowly made our way to a quiet remote burial spot facing the sacred hill, Arunachala. We threw flower petals on the road the entire way as is the Hindu custom. The eight young men lifted her body off the cart and gently placed it in the prepared grave.

We said brief prayers. All participated in covering her with earth. It rained for five minutes immediately after we finished--a blessing and very auspicious. The grave site was prepared beautifully. A large cluster of incense was placed on it. Camphor was burned at the foot and head. Vibhuti and cum-cum were liberally sprinkled all over . The large garland was placed on top of the dirt mound. And as is the local custom, a small pool of milk was poured on it, with a stick of incense placed in the middle--beginning and ending of life with milk.

We will miss her.

Leslie

============================

And these, dear People, are two other special stories written in the past.

Here, in this sacred land of Shiva and Bhagavan, the energy can be so intense...With the extremes of happenings unfolding in this land of magic...All of them leading One inexorably closer to the Heart.

Our beloved Shelter seems, almost, to have a life of its own as it unfolds--one with many, many beautiful stories happening. It has evolved to a place where it is more a Center of Healing still adhering, though, to its sanctuary and rescue shelter roots...A few stories, below.

Raghu...He's the blind dog that we've had for over a year. As you enter the veranda, he's on the left.

When Raghu first came to us he had gone thru a severe trauma, and hovered on death. He had either been hit by a vehicle or severely beaten.

He remained in a coma-like state for several weeks. For the first week, he got i.v.'s, spinal injections of an anti-inflammatory, and intramuscular injections of pain killers. Then he started getting intramuscular injections of Neurobion (vitamins). As death receded, and he started moving a little, we saw that he was blind...A lot of loving...A lot of touching and stroking...A lot of nutrition...And he started sitting up.

After several months he was able to stand, and walk a little, tho' unsteadily. He then got proton and laser therapy from a European practitioner, which helped a lot. He was able to walk pretty well, but often he'd go in repeated, tight, clockwise circles...going around and around.

We contacted Sharon Callahan, a well-known animal psychic who supports our work. She sent a floral esence remedy (similar to Bach flower remedies, but prepared specially by her). It really softened the "circling", but didn't eliminate it completely.

Then just a month ago, we had a flash insight that the remaining circling might have a muscular, rather than neurological basis. So Vishwa, with an xray of the neck area, took Raghu to Suresh, the "maha" massage master. He had tight musculature in the neck area, and a tiny bone a little out of place. Suresh showed Vishwa a protocol of masages to be given twice a day. And it worked wonders. Raghu completely stopped circling. And his personality profoundly changed. He's now very relaxed. (The poor sweetheart has gone thru so much).

In order for him to have a good life with us, though, he has to roam free in the garden. So Vishwa, I think even today, is about to start the process of releasing him into the garden. Say a prayer for him.

============================

Night time rescue of a large cow...About a month ago at 11pm we got a call that a large cow had fallen into a six foot deep backyard septic tank. Vishwa, our beloved hero, called six friends and rushed over with ropes.

I got there around midnight. I was concerned because it was taking so long. Dr. Raja was also there when I arrived. The poor baby's stomach was resting on a small submerged wall across the center of the tank. Vishwa had thrown in a pile of sandbags on which her back legs could rest. The tank wasn't large area wise. Basically enough for the length of her body. The width was about three times her body. They'd partially dug a small ramp-like thing on one side hoping to pull her out. But they couldn't.

Vishwa called the Fire Dept. Rescue (I didn't even know Tiru had a Fire Rescue...Remember...This is India). A Fire Truck with four burly guys arrived. They worked for another hour and still couldn't do it. (I was worried that she'd tire and drown. I kept going to Vishwa for reassurance. He'd say, "Don't worry sir, we will do it"). But they needed more hands, yet. They went onto the street and got ahold of two other fellows. They struggled and struggled.

Finally it was decided that a thick rope at a particular spot under her belly would do the trick. But no one wanted to go in to put it in place. I mean it was a septic tank with all kinds of shit floating on the surface. To place the rope you'd be submerged up to your neck in shit. So Vishwa, our young hero, took off his clothes and in his underwear did the deed.

Then success.

The poor cow was terrified. There had been all kinds of shouting to get her to move when extricating her. But no fractures. No major wounds. Suprisingly, she was strong and had a lot of energy. Dr. Raja gave her an injection for pain. We tied her up. (It was like tying a bucking bronco)...and set about to reassure her. 

And so Dear Ones, our Shelter moves on, lifting suffering.

==============================

I talked about the exponential increase in Shelter activity in the last Report. Fortunately it appears to have leveled off. It's a good thing because we're really pressed. It's the first time I have seen stress on the faces of our beloved Staff.

We're getting between 550 and 800 treatment visits a month in the clinic. And the number of emergency rescues have been between 70 and 100 a month. Remember, too, that the big increase in clinic visits is auspicious because it's a clear sign that the Hearts of the people are really opening to the Precious Ones, and caring more for them...And the big increase in emergency rescues, most of which are traffic related, is ominous. It's a a sign that the traffic intensity is getting worse and worse for the Furry Ones.

We're crowded. The Precious Ones, though, still feel safe, cared for, and loved, AND are happy. They still play and wrestle, but they can't run around as freely as they did...I'm always so moved by the Staff, Dr. Raja, and Vishwa. I place my head at their feet.

A much larger facility is our number one priority. There's a real possibility of getting two acres of land right next to us that's owned by the Municipality. It's basically a vacant lot, and the Shelter is on a thin strip off on the side. It's the only possibility of staying close to town. There's no land like this otherwise available. Even if there were it would be financially out of reach for it would go for over $300,000US an acre. We could get this "empty lot" land on a longterm lease. It's very, very political, though. But there's a chance. Maneka Gandhi spoke to the Collector (like a regional governor). Dr. Raja and I met with him, and it went well. He might have the power to push it thru. Say a prayer for us.

===============================

The other night I was riding on my Honda Activa, feeding the 10 to 20 dogs I see nightly. It's a private thing, not Shelter. It simply feels good. Came across a young one who was really thin--her ribs prominently showing, and her stomach very narrow. It was about 9 or 9:30pm. Called Vishwa at home and he sent two of our guys from the night shift to get her. But she was too shy of people, and I didn't want her chased down. So Vishwa came out and after a lot of gentle coaxing he was able to get her. 

We brought her in on my two wheeler. I had given her a lot of Pedigree and biscuits while I was waiting for Vishwa, so she wasn't very hungry when we got to the Shelter. But she loved the warm milk. It may have been the first time, ever, that she had any.

It was already about 10 or 10:30 when a man drove up with his dog and told us she'd been in a squabble with a cobra and was bitten on the head. Called Dr. Raja who was there in ten minutes. With a lot of i.v.'s and whatever else he gave her, she lived. Om Namah Shivaya.

Vishwa, Dr. Raja, and I went home.

I called Vishwa around midnight to tell him how blessed we were to be able to do this Work.

================================

And now for a more serious note that I have mentioned in some of the individual communications I've sent.

There are a lot of good things happening, but also there's a wall of local government/bureaucratic/institutional indifference in which we have to operate. And your support helps us to move within that environment...to traverse the difficult passages looking neither to the left nor right, to stay focused on what we're doing, to fight the battles without attachment, to resonate only with the positive energy, and to give the Precious Ones love, caring, and protection.

I try to remember when things get really tough, that it's not situational, and it's not meaningless...It's really burning thru the obstacles for the Precious Ones. You can see it working as a lot of the heaviness lifts and things get better and better for them in Tiruvannamalai. Om Namah Shivaya.

Blessing of blessings. It isn't often in one's life that they get a chance to be involved in lifting so much suffering.

Locally, institutionallly, there is major movement. It's the beginning, but auspicious. The new incoming president of Ramana Ashram is strongly supporting us. And Shantimalai, a large excellent NGO, is now strongly supporting us.

=================================

Hoping that each of you is doing excellently...That you're unfolding beautifully and strongly inside. My Baba said that nothing is gained without some inner austerity. I think of it sometimes in worldly terms as, "Growing up ain't easy".

We're traversing some difficult terrain, and can use any support you're inclined to give. Recurring donations, even quite modest ones, are best for us. So please...Keep your support coming.

As in previous Reports, I've included a collection of photos. Hoping you'll enjoy them. Remember...The theme is simply LOVE.

With love, blessings, wishes for all things, good...Happy New Year...Leslie, The Ageing Expatriate Warrior.

 

 

 

 

Our beloved Lakshmi being worked on.
Our beloved Lakshmi being worked on.
It's Prem's eyes that anoint our Precious Ones
It's Prem's eyes that anoint our Precious Ones
How blessed we are to have you, dear Mani.
How blessed we are to have you, dear Mani.
You can simply tell by the eyes. Bless you, Prabha
You can simply tell by the eyes. Bless you, Prabha
Love. Love. Love.
Love. Love. Love.
O' my God. It's a mongoose. Be careful.
O' my God. It's a mongoose. Be careful.
AND...He made it across, safely.
AND...He made it across, safely.
Mooji-ji...blessing our beloved Shelter.
Mooji-ji...blessing our beloved Shelter.
Leslie, greeting Little Ones at nearby school.
Leslie, greeting Little Ones at nearby school.
Ken, Dr. Raja, and Leslie at Mooji concert.
Ken, Dr. Raja, and Leslie at Mooji concert.
"Da' Guys" standing up to greet a newcomer.
"Da' Guys" standing up to greet a newcomer.
Now that's what I call a real kiss!
Now that's what I call a real kiss!
Poor baby...Getting real close.
Poor baby...Getting real close.
Nov 5, 2016

The Incredible month of October

A face only a mother(and everyone here) could love
A face only a mother(and everyone here) could love

Hello Dear People,

It's mid-morning. Tiruvannamalai. I'm sitting in the Geman Bakery. Healthy food. "Killer" baked goods.

Got to sleep late last night. Just as I was starting on my "night feeding run"(I feed 20 to 30 dogs--Pedigree/hard baked biscuits,specially made--anywhere from a snack to a light meal, depending) on my Honda Activa, my rear tire blew. So I got a real late start. It's not a Shelter thing. It's a personal thing. Just feels good. I go part of the way around the mountain.

Haven't written in a while, almost three months. We've been busy. Very busy. Many of you know that the activity these last 2 1/2 years has increased exponentially. The average number of monthly visits to the clinic have increased from 340 to over 700 (ranging now from 500 to 750)...The average number of monthly rescues has increased from 40 to over 100. (These are cases above and beyond the clinic cases. They are almost all serious. And in almost all instances we go out to get them. Most are during the day, but a number are at night)...The number of monthly in-patient treatments has increased from 1100 to 1500.

  • The steady, strong increase in clinic visits is auspicious. It is a heartening reflection that people are opening their Hearts more and more to the Voiceless Ones, becoming more aware of, and caring more for them.
  • The strong increase in emergency rescues is ominous. Most of it is traffic-related. Tiruvannamalai has an almost unique traffic configuration that is increasing in intensity. And it is immensely dangerous and harmful for animals.

The amazing thing is that to walk around the streets, ours is probably one of the best scenes in the Country. And it visibly improves each year. However, lying underneath is one of the most severe traffic patterns for animals, not to mention people. And if the Shelter's services should stop at anytime, a floodgate would fill the streets with an unimaginable number of dying and suffering animals, numbering well over a thousand a year--not bringing it back to the awful situation that existed in 2007 when we opened, but to an almost unimaginable scene.

Also, as many of you know, that because of the increased activity, we need a much larger facility. It's amazing to me that the Shelter is crowded and yet is going so well. The energy inside feels so good, and the Voiceless Ones clearly feel safe, protected, and cared for...and are happy. I bow to our devoted Staff.

This is the mating season, so there are a lot of Little Ones. To reduce the Shelter population, we're considering renting a facility for a short while and using it for a foster home for twenty or thirty puppies. At our last Monday morning breakfast Staff meeting, I told Vishwa to increase the adoption activity. He has several college students who are trained to go out up to 100 kms looking for good homes for our Little Ones. He then goes to check them--the circumstances, the people, their motivation for wanting a pup. About fifty percent of them turn out to be good. The students are supposed to get 500 rupees for each puppy that is placed. He miraculously, in the last two days, has found homes for seven pups. (Sometimes, even with full effort, we'll only find four or five in a month!) Somehow we got into an exchange about the money involved. And Vishwa told me they won't take money from him, only expense reimbursement. He said they are doing it as a service and don't want the money. I was deeply moved. I told Vishwa to include them in the annual Diwali bonuses that are being given this week. Om Naman Shivaya.

And miracle of miracles...Historically there have been two major killers of our Precious Ones--parvovirus, and distemper.

  • Parvovirus had an overwhelming mortality, especially with young pups. There'd be no lead symptoms. Then one day they’d stop eating. The next day they died…Dr. Raja had a breakthrough about four or five years ago. There were two immunoglobulins developed in the West that were powerfully effective. It ended the threat. We now give a cocktail of the two to all incoming puppies as a prophylactic, which takes care of the problem. Only one injection! For the few cases that we get for treatment. An injection for three consecutive days is almost one hundred percent effective. 
  • But it is distemper that is the real biggie. It's a deadly viral disease (gastrointestinal, respiratory, central nervous system, and then brain) for which there is no generally known treatment. It is so contagious (can even be transferred thru the air) that during the distemper season, we treated our distemper cases in a totally separate foster facility. It was a long, involved treatment lasting four, five or six months. (I know of some facilities that didn’t even try treating but euthanized distemper cases because there was no treatment-only supportive therapies, and it was such an awful death.) We were in contact with several major veterinary colleges in the U.S. There was nothing promising being researched. Europe was the same. Just nothing. Dr. Raja tried dozens and dozens of things over the last six years. Some helped, marginally. He had developed a complex treatment regimen: Immunoglobulin, i.v.’s when needed, several homeopathic medicines, a strong ayurvedic immune system booster, Neurobion for nutrition plus mega doses of vitamin C, and anti-biotics for secondary infections…and, of course, a lot of loving. With all that care, almost all the young puppies still died, and he was only able to save 60 to 70 percent of the others. Fortunately he was able to keep them all comfortable….NOW…BLESSING OF BLESSINGS…FOR THE LAST TWO MONTHS (He had to wait this long to make sure the initial ten cases were symptom free.) HE FOUND A "SUPER-EFFECTIVE TREATMENT THAT WAS BURIED IN THE INTERNET. It involves the use of a vaccine made for Newcastle disease. He used it, at this point, on four adults and thirteen puppies. In cases where the disease has reached the central nervous system (there’s twitching like jerking) he gives them one injection directly in the spine--one mind you!!!—the very next day the twitching reduces 60 to 70 percent, and all other symptoms stop. For cases that have not yet reached the central nervous system he gives them two i.v.’s within 24 hours. The symptoms stop the day after the first i.v...THIS IS MAJOR…WE HAVE TO GO ABOUT SOLIDLY DOCUMENTING EVERYTHING…I told Dr. Raja to get “distemper kits” that can objectively establish distemper (because people could say, “Oh, they really didn’t have distemper”.)…And to take videos…THE REASON IT’S SO IMPORTANT TO DOCUMENT IS THAT IF IT’S GIVEN FULL CREDIBILITY AND ADOPTED BY VETERINARIANS AND SHELTERS ACROSS THE COUNTRY…IT CAN LIFT AN ENORMOUS AMOUNT OF SUFFERING AND SAVE HUNDREDS OF THOUSANDS OF LIVES…The people who actually discovered the treatment don't have the necessary credibility, so it's not been broadly adopted. Om Namah Shivaya.

Well that’s it for this report Dear People…Leslie, The Ageing Expatriate Warrior, signing off...

With blessings and wishes for everything, good...May we all be showered with compassionate understanding...May we all be gentler and kinder to each other.                                                                                             

Morning nap time.
Morning nap time.
Leslie,age 3...Just before founding the Shelter.
Leslie,age 3...Just before founding the Shelter.
Leslie,age79...9 years after founding the Shelter.
Leslie,age79...9 years after founding the Shelter.
Dr. Raja on emergency call.
Dr. Raja on emergency call.
Three days, trapped. He'd given up hope.
Three days, trapped. He'd given up hope.
Towards freedom and life.
Towards freedom and life.
Don't worry Little One.
Don't worry Little One.
Warriors three...Prema. Hari. Denise.
Warriors three...Prema. Hari. Denise.
Thank you. Thank you...Dear Gandhi-ji.
Thank you. Thank you...Dear Gandhi-ji.
Aug 6, 2016

Om Namah Shivaya, dear People

Ricky...Our "Poster Boy".
Ricky...Our "Poster Boy".

Om Namah Shivaya, dear People,

The esoteric meaning is I bow to my Innermost Self. I learned that from my Guru.

He used to come out each evening (Remember…I’m an “old guy”…So that was a l-o-o-n-g time ago) and say, “I welcome you all with all my Heart…That is my most important worship…To welcome another human being with love”. It felt so good to be greeted like that.

And so Dear People…I welcome you all with all my Heart…I hope you are all doing beautifully… Joyfully bounding in the meadow. (For any of you that have seen Walt Disney’s Bambi…This might evoke memories of Thumper, a young rabbit, and Bambi, a young fawn, bounding around a sunny meadow, surrounded by forest trees…playing and laughing in the sun).

I just finished writing a thank you note to one of our longtime supporters. I had commented that even tho’ we’re crowded, how amazingly good it feels inside our beloved Shelter. Chants playing continuously. And clearly, the Furry Ones feel safe, cared for, and loved. But I went on to tell her that for me, the real miracle was watching them being fed.

Below, an extract from that note.

They’re actually fed in sections: the garden…the veranda…the clinic…Thirty or forty bowls are put down in each section—quickly, but clearly not at the same time. You’d expect an all-out riot. Anyone of you that has tried to feed three or four dogs together know how ‘touchy’ a situation it is. But they wait their turn. It isn’t even the stronger or bigger ones that eat first. You can frequently see a disabled dog contentedly slurping his food, and several right next to him waiting for another bowl.

The trusting of the Staff implied. The ‘knowing’ that they will shortly get theirs. Their relationship with each other…to let one ‘enjoy’ while they wait. It is so moving.

Pranams again, and again, and again to our beloved Staff. 

June was another busy month. It slowed down a little for the hot season. But still busy: 518 visits to our clinic…849 treatments of in-hosp & resident creatures…Emergency rescues of 71 creatures (Almost all serious cases. Many puppies. We go out to get most of them-usually during the day, some at night)…22 sterilizations…130 anti-rabies injections…6 puppies/dogs adopted. (We have students going out 100 kms. To find good homes)…And we treated 42 patients other than dogs. (14 cats, 4 birds, 8 cows & calves, 7 goats, lambs, & sheep, 6 rabbits, 1 squirrel, 1 peacock, l duck).

Elaine, the veterinary nurse who joined us, has turned out to be major. Some of you already know that she was schooled in England, and has forty years experience. The last ten years she has been in India. For eight of them she was in a town where she cared for and protected the dog population. She personally paid for over 400 sterilizations that were performed by Blue Cross, and got the population under control. Every October she’d give 100 injections to protect against parvovirus and distemper. She cared for and nursed the Furry Ones 24 hours a day. Her whole life is devoted to lifting suffering from the homeless dogs. It is an incredible blessing to have her. And she belongs with us. Say a prayer that she stays permanently.

The hot season is over, and tho' my body handles heat quite well, it's nice to have it behind us. However, I am here 365. And tho' the daytime temp goes up to 110, it really is okay if your body does okay in heat. I spent six years in the Ganeshpuri Ashram of Gurumayi. And THAT was a real Hot Season. Here, there's a partial cloud cover a portion of the time. Reasonable humidity. Three or four rains during the three month season that helps break the heat, and give the ground relief. And there's a subtle relief in the air duing the night, which I especially enjoy on my late night rides around the sacred mountain, Arunachala...I won't tell you what a REAL hot season is like.

Amazingly enough, the Furry Ones do fine. Understandably they're not real active during the day. And we have to make sure they have plenty of water and shade. (Also, there are a number of places that have overhead fans.) 

A nice little story before I sign off. Happened only four days ago.

  • I take a late feeding ride partially around Arunachala where I give nice snacks to 20 or 25 dogs I'm connected with. It must have been around 10pm, near the beginning, just off a road that has fast moving cars and trucks...I was bending over to put down a snack for three Furry Ones--two adults, and a young one, when a teenage girl on a bike came pedaling over and frantically said, "There's a puppy that's been hit by a truck".
  • My Heart dropped. I went over there (it was only 75 feet away) with my Heart in my throat, bracing myself to see something awful.
  • It apparently had happened ten minutes before I came. Someone had pushed him with a pole, or something, to get him off the road. He was under a large parked cargo truck. I called Vishwa and Dr. Raja (who happened to be at the Shelter that was only a km. away). They sent Prem and Venkatesh out.
  • Then I crawled under the truck to get him, bracing myself. But there was only a little blood. The poor babe was very, very frightened. I was on my stomach and tried to gently pull him towards me. (In my mind, I thought he might have a broken back). I was whispering to him and kissing him as I maneuvered us out.
  • I had  been holding him for less than five minutes when Prem and Venkatesh showed. I gently had him against my Heart. Kissing him. Telling him not to be scared. That he was with very good people. And that we would take very good care of him.
  • I passed him to Venkatesh, and called Dr. Raja to tell him he would be there in five minutes...I spoke to Dr. Raja a half hour later. It was a male pup. About two months old. Nothing was broken. And he's going to be fine.
  • Yes! Yes! Yes!

Have again chosen a selection of photos to give you "A Hit" of our beloved Shelter...Remember: Our core practice is Demonstrative love--Hugging. Touching. Stroking. Reassuring. Kissing.

Please keep your support coming...We need all the help we can get.

With love and thanks, and wishes for everything good.

Leslie

Her Heart is as big as it looks.
Her Heart is as big as it looks.
It's such a demanding life.
It's such a demanding life.
Such elegant beauty.
Such elegant beauty.
They've been down the trail together a long time.
They've been down the trail together a long time.
Guess who the chairs are for.
Guess who the chairs are for.
Simply a stunning photo of PureHeart Sekar.
Simply a stunning photo of PureHeart Sekar.
A young eagle with us 3 days.
A young eagle with us 3 days.
What beautiful eyes.
What beautiful eyes.

Links:

 
WARNING: Javascript is currently disabled or is not available in your browser. GlobalGiving makes extensive use of Javascript and will not function properly with Javascript disabled. Please enable Javascript and refresh this page.