Mar 29, 2016

A Fantastic Start to Our Work in Ghana

Harvesting cashews.Bee pollination improves yields
Harvesting cashews.Bee pollination improves yields

We would like to thank everyone who has donated to this project - with your help we are using bees to change lives in Ghana. We are still in the early stages of implementing the project but already our work has created immense interest amongst school children.

Two schools which we are working with - Agomeda and Kranka primary schools - have established school beekeeping clubs called Buzz Clubs.

It’s simple: Children learn to keep bees in primary schools and honey sales fund their secondary school education. Children are guaranteed an education to age 16 AND they also acquire beekeeping skills for life. So far 24 children in 2 different schools are taking part in the project. In each school two teachers will become 'Buzz Club Coordinators' and they will also be assisted to established their own hives alongside those of the school club - so they can benefit too. This is important to maintain their commitment. 

"Bees are so important for pollinating mango and cashew. I am so excited by this project - it will help my crop yields and help young people in the community too"

Kwaw, farmer near Agomeda school

Buzz Club Ghana: the next generation of beekeepers
Buzz Club Ghana: the next generation of beekeepers
Jan 4, 2016

You made a difference - thank you

Temesgen (holding the comb) showing his honey comb
Temesgen (holding the comb) showing his honey comb

You helped us achieve and exceed our target of raising US$12,000 for People and Bees in Ethiopia in 2015 - thank you for caring.

We aimed to help 50 families and we achieved that - we trained 55 young men and women in Bahir Dar and Dera and 17 of the poorest families in Dera. The skills they have gained will last for a lifetime - giving themselves and their families a more hopeful future. We will continue to work with these new beekeepers in 2016, our focus will be on marketing - helping make links with buyers and negotiate a fair price. Please look out for a new project on GlobalGiving.

Mengistu (pictured on the left of Temesgen below) is a Development Agent and he provides regular technical follow-on support to beekeepers in his district. We know he has the skills to manage bees sustainably because he has started his own apiary too as a result of the work of Bees for Development.

In addition to our on-going work in Ethiopia -   we are starting an exciting new project in Ghana in 2016 - also through GlobalGiving. Our work in Ghana concerns introducing bees into cashew orchards giving poor farmers increased income from larger cashew yields - because of pollination - and money from honey too! 

Thank you for making a difference.

Newly made hives in Wonjeta - with bees and honey
Newly made hives in Wonjeta - with bees and honey
Tadfie - she uses the income from bees for seeds
Tadfie - she uses the income from bees for seeds

Links:

Dec 3, 2015

Youngsters take up beekeeping in Ethiopia

Abata is a new beekeeper, her mentor is Mr. Abebo.
Abata is a new beekeeper, her mentor is Mr. Abebo.

Bees are amazing - they pollinate crops, produce honey and beeswax and also create an economic reason for conserving trees. Plus, they don't need feeding and watering on a daily basis. But keeping bees is not always easy. In Ethiopia we are working hard to help youngsters get started from scratch. That means making a beehive, acquiring bees, taking care of them and then harvesting and selling honey. For a non-beekeeper each of these tasks involves something new - and can be daunting - especially considering that each beehive comprises several thousand stinging insects! This is why we are linking beginners to mentors - more experienced beekeepers who are right there in the community. They are on hand to give advice and help as needed.

Abata is a new beekeeper and her mentor Mr. Abebo recently helped her catch a swarm - so she now has two colonies. She has no land or assets of her own as her recent marriage failed and she is on her own. She is looking forward to her first honey harvest - she will use the money she earns to buy seeds and start a vegetable garden. The bees will pollinate her vegetables too.

We thank all our donors and supporters for helping people like Abata become self-reliant, giving her a future.

Abata
Abata's two colonies - one from a swarm she caught
Would you like some honey and bread?
Would you like some honey and bread?
 
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