Dec 27, 2017

In Ethiopia, Christmas is on January 7th

Siranesh
Siranesh
Did you know that Ethiopians celebrate Christmas on 7 January each year? And that in Ethiopia the current year is 2010? This makes no difference to bees of course. This year our partners have been working in Ligaba, Dangila, helping young women and men start beekeeping. Bees work hard. They collect nectar, and deliver it to beekeepers - who then exchange it for money. This money is used to buy food, seeds, clothes and school books. Siranesh is one of the young women we have helped. She keeps her bees near her home and looks at them every day. With bees she feels more hopeful of her future. "Life has always been hard for my mother. She has no money of her own. With bees, I see my life will be different". Thank you for helping Siranesh, and others like her, start out on a life full of opportunity and hope, because of bees.
Sep 11, 2017

Bees in trees in Ethiopia

Beehives are located in trees to attract swarms
Beehives are located in trees to attract swarms

One of the great things about beekeeping is that unlike other forms of livestock, bees can sometimes be obtained for free. If you are lucky! Simple cylinders made of bamboo are made and placed in trees, to attract wild swarms. Once the bees enter, the beekeeper retrieves the bees and places them in an apiary. In Derbanta, in our project site in Ethiopia, young people who have learned beekeeping from Bees for Development are, "rushing to catch bees", according to the local Development Agent. Thanks to the training provided by Bees for Development, and funded by you, young people now understand the value of honey and beeswax and know how to build their beekeeping businesses. The income they earn helps them build a livelihood - that will sustain them for years to come. 

Thank you for your support.

Emmanuel plants trees to feed his bees
Emmanuel plants trees to feed his bees
Jun 6, 2017

The future looks bright, with bees

Hives can be made locally, ensuring sustainability
Hives can be made locally, ensuring sustainability

Angouch has been taught how to keep bees and make top-bar hives by Bees for Development. Since the training she has not looked back.

“Beekeeping is a really beneficial activity. I have learned how to make my own bee hives. I have also learned how to harvest mature honeycomb only and maintain the quality by not crushing the honeycombs. We can harvest and sell clean honey – this is something that's very rare locally. It means more money for the family.”

Angouch’s future plans are to expand her current apiary, increasing the number of hives and the volume of honey produced. The extra money that she and her husband have been able to generate by selling honey means that they no longer have to rely on credit to purchase their fertiliser – “now, we buy it with cash,” she says, proudly.

Thank you for helping Angouch, and others like her. Your support is making a real difference.

Education and information provides lasting change
Education and information provides lasting change
Honey harvested, income earned
Honey harvested, income earned
 
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