Sep 24, 2018

School enterprises in Bihar

 

Anjali’s Clean Drinking Water Enterprise

Anjali, age 14, wants to solve a big problem for everyone at her school: drinking water. Yes, it’s true, there is no clean drinking water at her school. She’s pitched her plan and done the research to understand how much it will cost to install a water filter, she’s even met a plumber who will install it. The ingenious part of Anjali’s plan is that it’s a match: she’s gotten all the kids in her school, teachers and principal to agree to match what she’s won in Pitch it to make it happen. Anjali thinks that way everyone will own it, they’ll know what it cost to get clean drinking water and they’ll maintain it. Anjali is looking forward to watching the plumber install it, so she can learn skills to maintain it.

Ankita’s Paper Pencil Home to School Campaign

Ankita, age 13, wants to get everyone back in school, but she knows she can’t do this from school, she has to go house to house. She’s got a plan. With an all-girl team they’ll go to each house where they know there are children who should be going to school and talk to their families to see how they can help children enroll and go to school. Ankita thinks it might be because there’s no easy way to get to school, especially for girls, so she thinks they may all have to walk together, in large groups. Her promotion mechanism is to leave a notepad and pencil, so when the children are ready to go to school, they’ll have what they need to succeed.

Newton’s Laboratory

Deepak, age 14, loves science. He wants to know everything he possibly can about the science of everything. What does sulphur smell like? How does a telescope work? Everything. But Deepak’s school doesn’t have a science lab. Only once a year does his science teacher take him to another school’s science lab. More than anything in the world Deepak would love to have a science lab in his school.  He and his friends have made a list of equipment and costs. He tells us 400 children will be impacted, today, now, when the lab opens, and 400 children every year after that. 

A school without stories 

Inzmam, age 14, loves to read but there is no library in his school and that’s a problem when you love to read. He’s got a plan. There’s an unused room in his school that he’s already got permission from the principal to turn into a library. And he’s already asked his friends, teachers and families across the village to donate books. He’s pitching to everyone to fund a little bit for book cases and chairs. He tells us 350 children will be impacted right now, he’s made teams of children to run the library like a bank checking in books and out again. With a wonderful big smile he asks if we’ll match his investment. Yes, we will. 

Links:


Attachments:
Sep 4, 2018

A Girl's Guide to 21st Century India

Toolkit, stories
Toolkit, stories

A Girl’s Guide to 21st Century India

A Girl’s Guide is rough guide of all girls need to know to make a new life plan and make it happen, stay in school, problem solve, learn the skills they need to succeed and one day go to work or set up an enterprise of their choice.

A Girl’s Guide to 21st Century India is an offline to online toolkit designed to equip adolescent girls with the 21st Century skills they need to succeed in school and to make new life plans. 

A friend once said, “The greatest tragedy is that young people in India do not have life plans. I’d like to change that.”

Inspired by his insight and digging deeper to find out how right he was, we’ve been surveying 10,000 girls to ask:

What is your life plan? What do you want to know? What must we should be in our Girl’s Guide to 21st Century India?

Girls told us that 22% of them dropout of school because their families move. Only 4/10 girls thought women should be paid the same as men. 73% of girls say they have seen violence against women and girls in the world around them. They are also bothered by the violence they see on TV. 1/6 have mobile phones and use them to call home to tell everyone where they are. You can see the complete report on www.goingtoschool.com.

Based on what they’ve suggested, we’ve designed and prototyped a Toolkit.

A Girl’s Guide is an all-in-one box, a toolkit of 20 skills stories in dynamic illustrated formats, skills challenges that enable young people to learn applied financial literacy skills, make a budget, open a bank account, manage their money online, encouraging young people to sign up and get all the paperwork they need to succeed, explore 21st Century skills such as problem-solving and making a plan, understanding sexual reproductive health choices applied to economic choices/costs, nutrition, self-defense, keeping fit, public transport, including and protecting girls, the cost of a wedding/marriage, clean energy, pollution, climate change, organic farming and sustainable enterprise, how to balance wants and needs, emotions, where to go when things go wrong, rights, laws, taxes, insurance and if they move to a city, how to make it, how to navigate and succeed. Feminist economics.

Each of the 20 challenges has a QR code that asks young people to use mobile phones or laptops to go online, log their challenge answers/data, make their new life plans, learn more, watch mini movies or animation and learn how to code. 

The online component is an exceptional data collection tool for impact, enabling girls who are currently offline, when accessing the Toolkit, to go online to understand technology and explore it's ethical, safe use for information and access.

What’s the problem A Girl’s Guide wants to solve? 

Education in India is not yet linked to work, enterprise or employment. Girls don’t often complete school and go to work. In the next three years 100 million young people will be on the move and in search of work. At the moment, these young people are still in Government Secondary schools and others are enrolled in skills programs in rural India. They may or may not be learning what they need to succeed and enter into a career or enterprise of their choice. Girls are most at risk from dropping out, but education’s lack of relevance to work is national and equally failing boys and young men. We’d like a chance to change that.

Young people need a chance to be able to chart new life plans and have a chance to make them come true.

We're testing A Girl's Guide from the offline to online stories and coding challenges now, in Bihar. 

We'll be back with more insights into what we learn and will be hoping to rollout the toolkit in 100 government secondary schools and also, based on multiple requests, we're now hard at work building a toolkit for boys. 

 

Have a look inside
Have a look inside
More stories
More stories
Offline to online toolkit
Offline to online toolkit

Links:

Jun 25, 2018

The Children's Scrappy News Service Prime Time TV

Build a newsroom
Build a newsroom

It has been a longer journey than we’d expected, yet, finally, we’ve reached the top of the mountain and can see how far we’ve come. The Children’s Scrappy News Service, our original, made in India for a world of children TV show, will air on Sunday, July 1st at 4pm, on Rishtey. Rishtey is a free-to-air channel that is extremely popular in North India, with 25 to 45 million children and families tuning in to watch. We’re delighted it is a Sunday. Sunday always seemed right for a children’s TV show. The Children’s Scrappy News Service is a news-talk-game show run by kids and a robot, in a newsroom made of junk and once-loved-things, kid anchors and their guests get to the bottom of some of the biggest problems that are important to kids: Why is there no place to play? How do we get every dog a job? How do you learn how to swim if you don’t have a swimming pool? From making the switch to clean energy to recycling everything, we believe anyone can be Scrappy. For us Scrappy means to make something out of nothing to change the way things are. Scrappy TV is a prime time TV format. Every Scrappy TV show has a scrappy bot that kids can interact with to answer quiz questions and win scrappy stuff, like backpacks made of recycled things. Scrappy TV also let’s kids know about Scrappy’s APP, scrAPP where kids anywhere in the world can be a part of the movement, becoming reporters to make their own stories or joining our scrappy campaigns such as making a place to play. For schools and kids that are not online, there are scrapbooks made of recycled materials, plastic, cardboard, leaves, that kids can use to explore what is design-thinking, build their own newsrooms and create their own stories. We’re also delighted to have our first series of ‘internationally scrappy’ shows from Mexico City. If you are in India, do tune in July 1st, at 4pm, to watch the show, and every weekend after that, Saturdays and Sundays at 4pm. If you are not in India, you can see what’s happening on www.scrappynews.com, on our Facebook, Youtube and Instagram. The Children’s Scrappy News Service is an idea, concept, platform for children’s voices that we’ve been working on for over three years. Scrappy is designed to launch a nationwide conversation about the skills children should be learning at school and to give children a voice. We’d love to know what you think of Scrappy, hand on our hearts, we believe it’s the best we could do and it comes out of over 15 years of work on the ground with children in offline schools. Thank you for your belief and support. Be Scrappy.

Once loved things
Once loved things
Red sofa
Red sofa
Boxes
Boxes

Links:

 
WARNING: Javascript is currently disabled or is not available in your browser. GlobalGiving makes extensive use of Javascript and will not function properly with Javascript disabled. Please enable Javascript and refresh this page.