Feb 26, 2021

You're part of the story of women-led recovery in Mexico

Sociedad Mexicana Pro Derechos de la Mujer
Sociedad Mexicana Pro Derechos de la Mujer

The impacts of the September 2017 earthquakes in Mexico did not simply come in the form of wreckage, destruction, and loss. The aftermath also galvanized female leaders across the country to be on the forefront of recovery. Sociedad Mexicana Pro Derechos de la Mujer (known as Fondo Semillas), one of GlobalGiving’s nonprofit partners in the country, created the “Women Rebuilding Their Communities” program to provide grants and technical assistance to grassroots women’s groups working on recovery efforts in their communities.

Thanks to your generous donation and commitment to long-term disaster recovery, GlobalGiving has been a substantial long-term contributor to the program. After more than three years of supporting 24 grassroots, women-led organizations, Fondo Semillas concluded its program just last month. You can read about the incredible success of the program here.

I’ll leave you with a quote from Alejandra, one of the community leaders supported by Fondo Semillas. Alejandra is a director of Una Mano Para Oaxaca (also a GlobalGiving nonprofit partner), an organization working in Ixtaltepec, Oaxaca—a town that was severely impacted by one of the 2017 earthquakes.

“Our dream is to see Ixtaltepec as a regional example of cultural sovereignty and social justice through personal and community development. We want our town to be capable of using its culture, as well as its ancestral and traditional knowledge, to generate a solid platform that will allow it to restore the community’s health. We plan to continue creating and sharing so we can repair the cracks in our community,” Alejandra said.

Thank you for choosing to support community-led disaster recovery in Mexico. After more than three years of funding long-term earthquake recovery, GlobalGiving will soon distribute our final round of funding and close this Fund. In months ahead, you will receive a final report highlighting all we have accomplished together.

With gratitude,
Chase + the GlobalGiving Team

Feb 23, 2021

You're fueling support after back-to-back storms

Last November, devastating back-to-back hurricanes Eta and Iota struck communities across Central America. Hurricane Eta, a Category 4 storm, and Hurricane Iota, a Category 5 storm, both came ashore in Nicaragua, ultimately impacting about seven million people in the wide-area from Mexico to Colombia. Communities in Nicaragua, Honduras, and Guatemala bore the brunt of the impacts. Tragically, these storms remind us that the effects of climate change continue to disproportionately impact the most at-risk communities across the globe.

Thanks to your generous donation to GlobalGiving’s Hurricane Iota Relief Fund, we have been able to provide immediate and ongoing financial support directly to our local, trusted nonprofit partners working in storm-impacted communities. Here is a snapshot of how GlobalGiving’s nonprofit partners have been making a difference since Hurricane Eta and Iota made landfall:

  • Population Council is ensuring that Indigenous Q'eqchi' communities in Chisec, a town in northern Guatemala, receive the critical support they need to recover from the impacts of Eta and Iota. The organization is getting financial resources directly into the hands of Na'leb'ak, an autonomous network of young Indigenous women that connects them to vital resources during the multiple emergencies caused by COVID-19 and the hurricanes.
  • Agua Pura Para El Pueblo’s long-standing relationship with a small, remote community in northern Honduras came into play after the community's water system was seriously damaged by the hurricanes. The nonprofit immediately acted to get the pipes and emergency supplies needed to repair the water system. The organization also quickly provided emergency supplies, including clean water, soap, bleach, and face masks, to Indigenous families in the southern Mexican state of Chiapas after their neighborhoods were flooded during the hurricanes.
  • Un Techo para mi País Colombia is raising awareness about the impacts of the storms on the Colombian islands of San Andrés and Providencia. Each island was severely affected by the storms, with a vast majority of infrastructure on both islands sustaining damage. The organization continues to provide emergency food kits and housing support to communities on the islands.
  • Integral Heart Foundation has a proven track record of serving local communities in Guatemala over the past 10 years. Following the hurricane and the impacts of Eta and Iota, the organization continues to work closely through its local networks in storm-impacted areas to provide emergency supplies to families that have lost their homes and livelihoods.

The need remains enormous for impacted communities across the region. Within the next two weeks, GlobalGiving will be sending another round of direct financial support to our Central American nonprofit partners on the frontlines of response. We will be in your inbox again in the months ahead with an update about the continued incredible work of our partners.

Thank you again for your generosity and support of community-led disaster recovery.

 

With gratitude, 

Chase + the GlobalGiving Team

Feb 23, 2021

Making strides in complicated times

View from St. John Community Foundation home site
View from St. John Community Foundation home site

Our thoughts are once again with Texas and our nonprofit partners like Bayou City Waterkeeper in Houston, TX. The area is recovering from winter storms that left many residents without power and water for days. But Texas’ water problems started long before the winter storm.

“A denial of climate change means no real planning has been done to prepare infrastructure to meet increasingly extreme weather, from hurricanes like Harvey to the current freeze—but also more ordinary heavy rain events that our region faces,” said Kristen Schlemmer, legal director at Bayou City Waterkeeper.

Over in Florida, the Federal Disaster Case Management Program provided by FEMA has ended for survivors of Hurricane Michael. The work is not over, so nearly 300 impacted families and individuals were referred to Doorways of Northwest Florida and another local nonprofit to receive continued support. At the same time, Doorways of NWFL has been helping distribute CARES Act funding. This provides support to cover rent, mortgages, utilities, child and elder care, and food expenses for households that lost income due to COVID-19.

Meanwhile, in the USVI, the St. John Community Foundation's disaster case management team identified 31 more homes that won’t be repaired under any government program. Organizations like theirs can help fill the gaps, but some residents have had to move on, leaving their homes and the islands behind. Others are still living in tents awaiting a better future. Due to pandemic lockdowns and the limited open hours of the permitting office, the work of reconstructing homes has slowed. Some home projects have been finished though.

One senior citizen, “JN,” moved into her fully rebuilt home a couple of months ago, thanks to the work of St. John Community Foundation. The community came together and donated four pallets of concrete blocks for the walls. Donations from individuals helped hire the labor to build the walls, install windows and doors, and pour a strong hurricane ready concrete roof.

The communities supported by the Island Spirit Fund have suffered setbacks that drive home how important it is to adapt. Bayou City Waterkeeper is working with—rather than against—nature for long-term resilience. Doorways of Northwest Florida is guiding their clients amid three states of emergency (two natural disasters and a pandemic). St. John Community Foundation is figuring out how to build homes with more paid labor while volunteers are unavailable.

Flexible funding from donors like you give these organizations the freedom to invest their time and resources where they are needed most. Thank you for listening to and being part of their stories.

Bayou City Waterkeeper supports this wetland
Bayou City Waterkeeper supports this wetland
 
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