Jul 30, 2018

Support Needed as Emergency Cases Increase

Kato
Kato

Home is not a place.  It’s being with someone who cares and loves you.

Your support is so very appreciated, more than words can express. 

During the second quarter (April - June), Pets of the Homeless paid for 501 emergency cases, a 45% increase over the first quarter.  Our cost $89,049, a 63% increase.  Hospitals discounted $21,006, a 66% increase, a testament of their compassion to help pets of the homeless. 

As word spreads, more and more homeless are calling for our help to stop the pain of their beloved companions and we need your help.   

Selecting stories to feature for this report is very difficult, all are sad.  At the same time, it is comforting knowing that we have eased the suffering of pets that belong to the homeless.

June 14 - Eve called Pets of the Homeless and asked for assistance with her 170-pound Bull Mastiff, Kato. Eve is a homeless woman in the San Diego, California area. She is living in her car with Kato and told Pets of the Homeless that she is finally getting into a pet friendly shelter. She asked for assistance with getting a big enough crate sent to the shelter that Kato could sleep in because there wasn’t enough room in her car for the both of them anymore. Pets of the Homeless helped Eve get a crate drop shipped to the shelter. Eve also informed us that Kato had an eye infection. She said one of his eyelashes grew inward and is now rubbing his cornea and his eyes were really dry. She also said Kato had some open sores on his front legs. We approved an exam at B Street Veterinary Hospital.  (57% of calls that turn into cases are from homeless women.)

After the examination, a doctor at B Street contacted us and informed us Kato had an eye infection and needed an eye gland cyst removal. They recommended and we approved: cytology, injections, eye stain, cryotherapy, and medications. We approved all treatment along with a recheck. The doctor also informed us that they found a little bubble between Kato’s toes and they might need to do exploratory surgery on his foot. Eve called back the day after her appointment and told Pets of the Homeless that she was very thankful for our help. Pets of the Homeless spent a total of $319.68 at B Street Veterinary clinic.

June 4 - Mr. Wheeler called Pets of the Homeless regarding his dog, Matty, a 6 year old in-tact male Chihuahua who had been in a fight with another dog.  Mr. Wheeler is a homeless man who lives in a tent on property in Santa Rosa, CA.  Someone came to the gate and his dog got in a fight.  He has been homeless for 23 years and he heard about us through Dr. Henriksen at ACME Pet Repair in Occidental, CA.  Matty’s eye had been injured badly in the dog fight and it had happened over a week ago.    We approved an examination with Dr. Henriksen. 

After the exam, the doctor said that Matty’s eye needed to be removed, the procedure is called an eye enucleation.  We also asked the doctor to please neuter Matty, because his owner thought it would help out and hopefully no more dog fights would happen.

We approved the surgery, and Matty’s eye was removed and he was neutered.  We paid $508.00 to ACME Pet Repair.  Of the total, $80 was for the neuter.

June 11 - Pets of the Homeless received a call from John, originally back in March of 2018.  John was in San Diego, CA, originally from CO, living in his van seeking work.   His 10-year-old neutered male Golden Retriever, Salty Dog, had a tumor on his back hip that burst open.  The Humane Society helped and removed the tumor.  He called us and said he was very grateful for our services even though he didn’t use them.

He called us again in June. Salty Dog’s tumor has grown back and opened up again.  We approved an examination at B Street Veterinary Hospital.  After a thorough exam, the veterinarian called our Case Manager and told her that it looks like cancer.  The veterinarian said that Salty Dog doesn’t look like a surgical candidate at this time, but recommended a fine needle aspiration, cytology, blood panel, and x-rays to find out what type of cancer it is.  They wanted to check to be sure the cancer hasn’t moved into Salty Dog’s bones.  We approved the diagnostics and assisted with $366.88.

The veterinary technician had troubles and needed to add sedation in order to get the procedures done.  The vet also added antibiotics to the treatment plan.  Salty Dog was diagnosed with cancer.  The vet prescribed ongoing medications.

We received a call from John on June 15.  He said he was “home” now, and by that he meant he was back in Colorado.  He said it was impossible to get established in CA.   He has an interview for a teaching position and it looks promising.  He was still living in his van, and he was trying to keep it together with Salty Dog’s diagnosis.  He asked us if we knew of any resources for discounted prescription medications.  We explained we have a discount card and put one in the mail to him at his mailing address.  We also suggested he shop around for the best prices.

He asked if we could help with some additional medications for Salty Dog’s last days to help him be out of pain.  We assisted with $118.66 to Pet Aid of Colorado for senior profile lab work, gabapentin, prednisone, and tramadol medications.  The bloodwork results showed Salty Dog had low albumen, which is a side-effect of cancer.  The vet mentioned that Salty Dog had weeks to one month left.

 We wished him the best in his future endeavors and to enjoy his time with his best buddy.

Should you like to read about more of our emergency veterinary care cases they are available on our website and in our monthly newsletter. (Sign up on line.)

Your donations made it possible for us to help dogs like Salty Dog, Matty and Kato.  These and all veterinary cases are paid directly to the hospitals at time of service. 

Thank you for your support and gifts that allow us to treat the hundreds of pets that need veterinary treatment.  

Salty Dog
Salty Dog
Matty
Matty

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May 7, 2018

First Quarter Success Stories

Boomer
Boomer

During the first quarter (January-March), Pets of the Homeless paid for 225 emergency cases, our cost $56,296.55.  Hospitals discounted $13,811.27, a testament of their compassion to help pets of the homeless.  As word spreads, more homeless are calling for help, in April alone we had 105 emergency cases.

Boomer

Pets of the Homeless received a call from a woman who is currently residing in a tent in the San Diego area. The woman told us that she had been homeless for about two years and that she sold all her belongings so she would have money to give her son. The woman informed us she had a 1-year-old dog whose name is Boomer and that he had been attacked by a coyote the night before. She said that he was bleeding and had bite marks all over. We approved an exam right away.

After the exam, the doctor contacted us and recommended x-rays be done. She mentioned that Boomer would become very upset when she would try and touch him. The doctor informed us that the x-rays would help to see if Boomer had puncture wounds penetrating his abdomen. Boomer luckily did not have severe puncture wounds, so the doctor sent Boomer home with medication and a rabies vaccine.

Penyo

Pets of the Homeless received a call from a homeless woman who was currently living in a garage with no running water or facilities along with her 14-year-old Lab/Beagle mix, Penyo. The woman informed us that it would take her a few minutes to respond to our questions because the conversation was being translated to her via sign language.  (Note: Over 20% of the people we help are disabled).  The woman was hard of hearing and luckily saw our flyer and asked us for assistance. Her dog, Penyo, had lumps on his throat that she thought were cancerous and might have an ear infection. The woman was worried that due to her dogs’ old age, it was time to put her down.

Upon a thorough examination, it was noted that the lumps were not cancerous or dangerous but Penyo’s face did have Pyoderma, which is a skin infection. During Penyo’s exam the doctors also found that she had a urinary tract infection and an ear infection.

After the exam, the doctor recommended bloodwork and x-rays. Pets of the Homeless approved this treatment along with injections and medications. They also sent Penyo home in an E-Collar to prevent him from licking himself.

Should you like to read about more of our emergency veterinary care cases they are available on our website and in our monthly newsletter. (Sign up on line.)

Your donations made it possible for us to help Boomer and Penyo.  These and all cases are paid directly to the hospitals at time of service. 

Thank you once again!

Penyo
Penyo

Links:

Mar 2, 2018

Gizmo and Bella Boo

Bella Boo
Bella Boo

Pets of the Homeless is proud to be the go-to organization for information on pets that belong to the homeless.  We receive calls and emails from reporters, writers, TV, radio and students from around the world.  The human/animal bond, and the how and why of the organization are the most requested information.  As advocates for the pets that happen to belong to a homeless person, we are delighted to share what we have learned.

When Pets of the Homeless was founded, in 2008, the first priority of the organization was to supply homeless and low income with pet food.  The mission evolved over the last ten years and we now offer three additional unique programs that are funded with your help.  Words cannot express our appreciation.

One of our programs is a project on GlobalGiving - Emergency Veterinary Care.

Gizmo

Pets of the Homeless received a call for help from a homeless family living in a campground in Jamul, CA.  Gizmo is three years old and the emotional support dog for a young woman.  Gizmo had been congested and sneezing for about a month so we approved an exam.  He was first prescribed Benadryl for his symptoms, which did not help.  He went back in for a second exam and he had a foxtail up his right nostril.  We approved the procedure to have the foxtail removed.  About a week later, we received another call saying he was not doing any better and now his eye was swollen and he had green discharge coming from his nostril. 

We approved a recheck at the vet.  Their diagnosis was that there were residual hairs left over from the foxtail removal and they advised us that this would require a specialty veterinarian who had a longer scope to perform a Rhinoscopy (an examination of nasal passages) in order to see what was causing the symptoms.  We approved the exam at a specialty vet. 

The vet was able to sedate Gizmo and insert a swab to get a culture of the infected area.  Gizmo was given antibiotics and sent home still presenting symptoms.  Two days later, we received a phone call from Gizmos owners stating that he had “sneezed” out a foreign body and was no longer showing the symptoms of sneezing and wheezing. However, the culture results showed there was a bacterial infection present so Gizmo will be continuing treatment with antibiotics and follow-up care.  We are continuing to work with the family and other nonprofits that can assist with the mounting costs.

Bella Boo

Pets of the Homeless received a call from a homeless advocate in Columbus, OH about a man living in a tent in the woods with his 8-month old Lab mix, Bella Boo.  Bella Boo was in bad shape.  She was vomiting, had diarrhea, white gums and was very lethargic.  A local vet had administered a parvovirus field test, which came back negative.  This dog was sick and needed help.  We were able to speak with the owner and approved an exam at an emergency vet hospital.

The advocates provided transportation to the hospital.  At the hospital, another parvovirus test was done which came back negative. The vet informed us that sometimes the parvovirus can be so bad that it will show as negative on the test.  The doctor wanted to treat the symptoms as if they were parvovirus. We approved and pledged the maximum amount that we could to help with Bella Boo.  The treatment consisted of hospitalization, IV SQ fluids and injections of medications.  She was in the hospital for six days receiving treatment and showed a significant improvement by the end of her stay.  The advocates returned a very healthy and happy Bella Boo to her owner at their home in the woods.

Gizmo
Gizmo

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