May 15, 2017

Visit to the "Miracle Caves" --a Project Update

Bushman Elder on the Kalahari Dunes
Bushman Elder on the Kalahari Dunes

“We should all get together and take hands to experience peace on earth and to also respect the earth. And to also give the earth the respect she deserves. And to draw from the strength of the earth and to revive this very strong spirit so that everybody can see that it is their saving grace.” Lys Kruiper, Bushman Elder

 

Dear Donors,

 

We are very grateful for the ongoing and generous support we receive from you, making our work with the Khomani San Bushmen possible. We have some news to share with you this month about our work in the region.

 

First, we were able to bring two Bushmen Elders to one of the oldest Bushmen Caves in South Africa.  These Elders are among a very few remaining traditional healers in their community, and they are the bedrock for their community, taking in numerous children whose family members drink or are ill due to the effects of alcoholism or domestic violence. They also care for their own extended families, and often end up feeling very isolated and in despair over the state of their people--who have been forcibly removed from their ancestral lands to lands with no water, where liquor is often sold for cheaper than water. The purpose of the visit was to bring these Elders to the "Miracle" cave to have an opporunity to make offerings and prayers for their people and for the Mobile Addictions Treatment work ahead. This was their first visit to the Caves and they shared that being in this ancestral Cave brought them much-needed inspiration and hope for their people.

 

We were also able to facilitate a meeting between the Bushmen and the last remaining South African high Sanusi Elder who is half Bushman. This 95-year-old Elder has not been well enough to meet with many who visit him, but the visit between him and the Bushmen Elders lasted over an hour and seemed to rejuvenate and inspire hope.

 

After the prayers in the Cave and the meeting with the high Sanusi, new developments have begun to open for our work ahead. Several new potential individual and organizational donors have come forward, and the momentum for this work is building. We will be having meetings with a number of potential donors who are interested in this work over the course of the next few months.

 

And in June, a WISN team member will be traveling to the Kalahari to meet with the graduates of the Community Addictions Treatment program held last May in the Kalahari to learn from and work with the Bushmen on the next phase of our work together. We will report on this and any other new developments in our next report.

 

Thank you so much, donors, for your ongoing support, and thank you for sharing this project with friends, colleagues, and family who might be interested in supporting the Bushmen reclaim their health, power, and identity.

 

“These three holes in the sand that you see represent three directions. The one in the East reprehends the light; the one in the South represents water. The one in the north brings peace and happiness. This gathering that brought this knowledge forward was a gathering to bring peace to earth. We on earth do not know who we are, where we are from or what we want.”  Isak Kruiper, Bushman Elder 

Bushman community
Bushman community
Waterless lands the Bushmen were forcibly moved to
Waterless lands the Bushmen were forcibly moved to
Bushman Elder on the Kalahari Dunes
Bushman Elder on the Kalahari Dunes
May 12, 2017

Special Trip to the Amazon--Spring 2017 Report

Int'l Security expert welcomed by community
Int'l Security expert welcomed by community

Dear Donor,

As always we are immensely grateful to each of you who have supported our work, which is guided by the ancestors and the spirit of the Big Cats.  

 

The Yawanawans of Brazil is an intact indigenous community that still practices sacred ancestral jaguar ceremonies. Though the land and climate where their communities are located are not an ideal terrain for jaguars, they have among the highest populations of jaguars in Brazil. They have lived in balance with the rainforest and jaguars for thousands of years, but because of modernization, poaching, and land grabs in recent years, jaguars, the immense biodiversity around them, and even the Yawanawans themselves--all intrinsically connected--are under severe threat.

 

Last month, WISN sent an international security and anti-poaching expert to Yawanawan territories to work with the community, learn from them, and develop a strategy for best practices to help create a corridor of protection for Jaguars that would ultimately extend up through the rest of South and Central America. The meetings went well and the security expert has been able to prepare a plan for anti-poaching measures that would include patrol boats, a central anti-poaching station, and the training of community members for anti-poaching procedures.

 

The plan will require additional funding, so every bit helps. The security expert will be traveling back to Brazil in June to continue Phase I of the plan and will continue to meet with the Yawanawan tribal leaders to discuss more ways in which Western and Indigenous science can work together to preserve the sacred jaguar as well as the sacred lands on which they live.

 

This past quarter, WISN has also been working with Yawanawan Chief and Indigenous Cultural Practitioner Tashka Yawanawa and his wife Laura to network during a recent trip to Washington, D.C. We have been networking with conservation contacts at the Smithsonian Institute as well as with potential funders, including an organization that has a large conservation area for desert jaguars in the Sonoran Desert region of Mexico, and an organization with a conservation facility in Costa Rica. If the momentum continues, the Yawanawan dream to create a corridor of jaguar protection that extends from the rainforests of Brazil through Mexico and the SW United States may, in fact, become a reality.

 

We will continue to raise funds for this effort as well as our work with the other big cats, and report back to you on some of our other developments in our next report.

 

As always, we are immensely grateful to you, our donors, for all you have done to make this possible. Thank you! 

Feb 14, 2017

Continued Hope for the Bushmen--Winter 2017 Report

White sands
White sands

Mobile Addictions Treatment for the Khomani San Bushmen

Winter 2017 Project Update

 

Dear Donors,

We are very grateful for the ongoing and generous support we receive from you, making our work with the Bushmen possible. It has been a bit of an uphill battle and we still very much need your help. There is no infrastructure currently in place either domestically in South Africa or internationally to support Bushmen addictions recovery; we are actually creating this infrastructure through this project. If we don’t succeed, we stand to lose our oldest ancestors and their vast knowledge systems. They want to reclaim their health and identity—will you help?

Most of our work this past quarter has involved networking, raising funds through various sources, and identifying who will come forward for this inspirational charge.

In addition to regular distance meetings via Skype with some of our existing South African partners, we are also extending our reach to locate new partnerships. We have begun negotiations with the Council for the Advancement of African Canadians in Alberta (CAAC) operating as the Africa Centre. Last month, we submitted an MOU to this organization, which we hope will facilitate fund development as well as serve as a support for donations and support from Canada.

We have also located an organization who, though a program designed to help save indigenous languages from going extinct, may also be able to partner with us to bring in additional funds and resources. Discussions are ongoing and we hope to have a face-to-face meeting in the weeks ahead to discuss plans going forward. We are very excited by the possibilities opening up for this work.

We are also in discussions to bring a Native American Elder to the Kalahari to share his and his people’s story of recovery with the Bushmen, Though an interim step prior to the full 40-day Mobile Addictions Treatment program we plan to offer to the Bushmen, this will serve as a morale building mid point step to inspire the Bushmen who are working on their own recovery.

Finally, we would like to share some artwork and images from a full moon eclipse ceremony on Native American white sands in the United States. Doing ceremony under the full moon, we gathered some of the snow-white sands, which we plan to share with the Bushmen who consider their sands of the Kalahari to be most sacred. We hope that this exchange will create more inspiration and hope for the Bushmen.

We give much gratitude for your ongoing support, and thank you for sharing this with friends, colleagues, and family who might be interested in supporting this cause.

Sacred sands of the Kalahari
Sacred sands of the Kalahari
Khomani San Bushmen children
Khomani San Bushmen children

Links:


Attachments:
 
WARNING: Javascript is currently disabled or is not available in your browser. GlobalGiving makes extensive use of Javascript and will not function properly with Javascript disabled. Please enable Javascript and refresh this page.