La Reserva Forest Foundation

La Reserva Forest Foundation is a Costa Rican non-profit, tax exempt foundation working to restore and preserve native tropical forests, dedicated to creating "tree bridges" linking isolated forest islands using volunteers and the local school communities, and fighting global warming through various carbon neutral projects.
Mar 2, 2011

Sheltering Our Work

Roadside Hawk seen at the maleku Reserve
Roadside Hawk seen at the maleku Reserve

The Maleku Tribal Council was formed as a legal entity to oversee the reforestation of Maleku native lands along the Rio Sol. You can read about the devastation visited upon these indigenous people in other places, but more importantly at this time is the fact that they are working together with LRFF to restore both their forests and their way of life.

Currently the only place the Tribal Council has for meetings necessary in this reforestation effort, is a small, old, one-room building (called a rancho) that is falling apart. Large sheets of plastic have been used in only partially successful attempts to keep the rain out. It rains a lot in this part of Costa Rica! Imagine, if you will, trying to hold meetings that may determine the success of your future in a building held together by plastic! The Maleku Tribal Council hopes that through this project on Global Giving, LRFF will be able to provide the funding necessary which will allow them to build a new rancho that will keep out the rain. Your support can make that happen.

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Mar 2, 2011

River Forest and Indigenous People

The deforested banks of the Rio Sol
The deforested banks of the Rio Sol

We are particularly excited about this project as it will bring back native forest to the native peoples of Costa Rica. Already nurseries have been started with a total of 15,000 trees which will be planted onto 15 hectares in June and July. We continue to negotiate with other land holders along the Rio Sol with a goal of planting 35,000 trees on 35 hectares of land.

You know if you’ve read other project reports and seen the accompanying photos how very quickly reforestation occurs in this part of the world. Within two years many of the trees are large enough for one to walk under their branches. In eight years all signs of the area once being pasture land are gone replaced by a young, thriving native forest providing food and shelter for both wildlife and the Maleku people. Your participation in this project will help us move more quickly in bringing about the restoration of both a forest and an indigenous peoples’ way of life.


The first nursery created for the Rio Sol project
The first nursery created for the Rio Sol project

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Mar 2, 2011

Conserving Forest on a Volcano

Flor de un Dia orchid grows on volcanoes
Flor de un Dia orchid grows on volcanoes

I was up at the Miravalles Volcano just last week. My friends and I make an annual trip to acquire the excellent volcanic clay that comes form this area. While there I looked up at the northern flank of Miravalles and was astounded at the deforestation, how high up on the volcano it reached. Surely cattle would roll down the hill as steep as it is.

It made me proud to know that along the western flank, reaching to the north is the forested property of Omar and Miriam Quesada. He has conserved this forest, rich with flora and fauna, for decades. As the lands around him were deforested his forest has stood as one last stronghold for the native life struggling to survive.

The payments LRFF will pay to the Quesada’s for the CO2 that this 90+ hectare forest is sequestering each year will enable Miriam’s daughter to finish her schooling. Without this deserved and addition income she will need to take a job without the benefits her diploma would  provide.

Come on everyone, let’s see the forest by way of the trees and realize they are living beings working for all life on Earth. They deserve our appreciation and the people who conserve them deserve something for protecting them.

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