La Reserva Forest Foundation

La Reserva Forest Foundation is a Costa Rican non-profit, tax exempt foundation working to restore and preserve native tropical forests, dedicated to creating "tree bridges" linking isolated forest islands using volunteers and the local school communities, and fighting global warming through various carbon neutral projects.
Dec 1, 2011

1115 Metric Tons CO2/Year

Two-toed Sloth in vital rainforest tree
Two-toed Sloth in vital rainforest tree

Omar Quesada has conserved this 93-hectare rain forest for decades. He, and his daughter Miriam, must come up with the resources to provide an education for Miriam’s daughter. She has only a couple of years of school left to graduate with a degree. Although Miriam works they live in constant financial distress and her daughter's degree is in jeopardy.

Recently we have spoken with them about the environmental service payments and they have agreed that if we can get together half the amount we promised to pay them ($30/ha/year) they would accept that until we can raise the other half. This will pay the family for conservation of this forest so that Omar's granddaughter will be able to finish school.

Payments for environmental services to the Quesada’s for 1 year saves the 93-hectare forest from being sold/developed, preserves habitat necessary for the wildlife, gives resources badly needed by this family and removes much CO2 from our atmosphere.

This forest is removing approximately 1115 metric tons of CO2/year from the Earth’s atmosphere. Why not help offset your CO2 whilst helping this family?

One variety of orchid in this rainforest zone
One variety of orchid in this rainforest zone
Another variety blooming now in the rainforest
Another variety blooming now in the rainforest
Dec 1, 2011

It's Being Planted As We Speak

Flor de Un Dia rainforest orchid
Flor de Un Dia rainforest orchid

Starting the first week of December 14 hectares of this land will be planted! This area was previously pastureland and will be planted with trees bought from the nurseries of the Maleku families who volunteered to grow baby trees for these projects.

With a team of volunteers and workers, we will start the regeneration process for this land that is ancestral land of the Maleku people, taken from them in the 19th century when 90% of the tribe was massacred for their rubber trees. The tribe went from over 6000 to less than 600, robbed of their ancestral lands.

The reforestation of this land will help increase the level of the aquifer that supplies the Maleku communities with water. Indeed, an ancient, functioning water source that supplies potable water can be found on the property. Preservation of the remaining forested land will provide materials for housing, food and medicine for the Maleku people. After this project is complete, the Maleku will have permanent free use of this land.

We still require funding to complete this project for purchase and maintenance.

The Costa Rican govt. gives legal residency to people investing a minimum $60,000 in the country, i.e. land, business, etc. A donor or 6 donors could buy this property and all receive permanent residence.

Help us give back to the Maleku people what is rightfully theirs.

Guaco or Laughing Falcon in English
Guaco or Laughing Falcon in English

Links:

Dec 1, 2011

Changing Day By Day

Deibys Villalobos being paid for his cacao trees
Deibys Villalobos being paid for his cacao trees

November 17 and 18 Jimmy Acosta, Bienvenido Cruz and myself did the tree inventory of the nurseries growing trees for the second phase planting of the Rio Sol Biological Corridor project. The final count was 20,250 and over 95 species.

I felt very fortunate to write all of the checks to the 18+ nursery owners on my birthday, what an amazing gift. Daniel, Jimmy and our friend Brian Bubb delivered them the following day, Friday, November 25th. Everyone in Tonjibe knew they were coming but I wasn’t able to tell them what time exactly. Dan, Jimmy and Brian had to go first to Katira and Guatuso to deliver checks. When they arrived at Palenque Tonjibe the bus was parked waiting, all of the nursery participants were waiting to receive their checks and board the bus for Guatuso where they would cash them. Only problem was each person had to also sign a receipt and by the time everyone signed the bus had left, leaving quite a large crowd of women and children behind. Daniel had to go up into the housing area to pay a couple of people who weren’t out in the street. When he came back to the car he said he’d never seen so many taxis coming in and leaving with so many people. Everyone doubled up and rented taxis because they’d missed the bus. 

This past Monday, the 28th, work began planting the second stage of the Rio Sol project. The preliminary crew hauled the trees from Felipa Alvarez’s nursery (500 meters into the forest without a road) out to the main road using a team of oxen and a small cart.

On Tuesday the full ten man team hauled all of the trees from the nurseries in Palenque Tonjibe out to the main road using plastic boxes and wheelbarrows. They also brought the 1000 cacao trees from Deiby’s nursery in Katira that took two trips with a cargo taxi. A truckload was also taken from the La Reserva nursery, approximately 800 trees of 15+ species, and delivered to the church in Tonjibe. That makes a total of over 21,000 trees and 110 native species. By the end of the day all of the trees except a small amount on the road into Tonjibe were sitting next to the bright green church ready for pick up by the tractor and huge trailer on Wednesday morning.

This morning, Wednesday, with everyone ready to haul the trees up to Marvin Castro’s farm in Viento Fresco, the tractor driver called to say he wouldn’t be able to make it. The team worked the rest of the morning hauling out the other small amount of trees at Palenque Margarita and then were done for the day. Mañana says the tractor driver. Hmmmm.

Waiting to ………………..GET PLANTING

Evelia Avarez and Daniel on pay day
Evelia Avarez and Daniel on pay day
Fidelina at left had the nursery w/most species
Fidelina at left had the nursery w/most species
Isidro Blanco who is participating with his land
Isidro Blanco who is participating with his land
Damaris Cruz E., our nursery/artist friend
Damaris Cruz E., our nursery/artist friend
Hauling trees w/oxen from Felipa
Hauling trees w/oxen from Felipa's nursery
Team placing trees at church lot
Team placing trees at church lot
10 man planting team (minus JImmy taking photo)
10 man planting team (minus JImmy taking photo)

Links:

 
   

donate now:

An anonymous donor will match all new monthly recurring donations, but only if 75% of donors upgrade to a recurring donation today.
Terms and conditions apply.
Make a monthly recurring donation on your credit card. You can cancel at any time.
Make a donation in honor or memory of:
What kind of card would you like to send?
How much would you like to donate?
  • $10
    (USD)
    give
  • $25
    (USD)
    give
  • $40
    (USD)
    give
  • $50
    (USD)
    give
  • $100
    (USD)
    give
  • $200
    (USD)
    give
  • $10
    each month

    (USD)
    give
  • $25
    each month

    (USD)
    give
  • $40
    each month

    (USD)
    give
  • $50
    each month

    (USD)
    give
  • $100
    each month

    (USD)
    give
  • $200
    each month

    (USD)
    give
  • $
    give
gift Make this donation a gift, in honor of, or in memory of someone?
WARNING: Javascript is currently disabled or is not available in your browser. GlobalGiving makes extensive use of Javascript and will not function properly with Javascript disabled. Please enable Javascript and refresh this page.