Aug 7, 2017

"Thank-you for bringing books to this library!"

Reading class with the new books in Dzitsoni
Reading class with the new books in Dzitsoni

“I would like to thank you for bringing these books to this library. My thought is that we should keep and maintain the books properly so that even when we become older our children will find the books and they will help them.”

Lamick, a primary school pupil in the coastal village of Dzitsoni in eastern Kenya, sends you this message. His library had just received a delivery of 259 books bought with your support.

As soon as the books arrived at Dzitsoni Community Library, the librarians began taking them to primary schools and working with teachers to give the children reading practice. The books are in Kiswahili - Kenya’s national language - and English.

Rumuruti Community Library, which serves a livestock farming community in Kenya’s Rift Valley, also received 259 books. “We feel privileged to be selected for the books donation. The Kiswahili books especially will help us reach more vulnerable and economically disadvantaged children in our community,” said Agnes Karegi, librarian in charge of Rumuruti Community Library.

During school holidays, children spend most of their time in the libraries, and librarians are delighted that the books have arrived in time to enrich a programme of reading and storytelling planned for the August holidays.

Your gift of 437 books in the local languages Acholi and Ateso, and English, inspired Moyo Community Library in Northern Uganda to expand the library to include a children’s reading room. “We have already bought plastic chairs and reading tables and installed the shelves, and now we are just completing the final touches of painting and decoration,” said Moyo librarian, Christopher Muzuri.

“Before the room is open, the books are already being used. Even the parents are coming to the library to read the books with their children,” said Christopher.

Since January this year, EIFL has disbursed a total of US$3,030 to libraries in Kenya, Ethiopia and Uganda to buy children’s books and give children the gift of reading.

Children explore the new books in Dzitsoni library
Children explore the new books in Dzitsoni library
Report-back on a new book during a reading class.
Report-back on a new book during a reading class.
May 31, 2017

Over 2,800 children learning practical ICT skills

Agona Nkwanta Catholic school, Western Region.
Agona Nkwanta Catholic school, Western Region.

Using email to write to family members living abroad; being able to help others to connect to the internet on mobile phones, and applying to study at colleges that only accept online applications.

These are activities that people in developed countries take for granted - but for children in Ghana, they are new and special skills. They are the top three benefits of the EIFL Hands-on Computer Classes project listed by children at Maakro D/A Junior High School, in Ashanti Region, in a short survey.

“Thank you for your support. This project is great - for the children who are gaining practical skills, and for the teachers who no longer have to teach children about computers in the abstract,” said Mr Ofosu Frimpong, Mobile Regional Librarian in Ashanti Region, who conducted the survey on 26 May 2017.

The project got off to a good start this year. From January to April, your donations, US$1,748, enabled the four mobile regional libraries in Ashanti, Upper East, Volta and Western regions to conduct 200 computer classes for over 2,800 children at 17 under-resourced junior high schools. This is over 1,000 more than the project’s goal of reaching 1,800 children.

The mobile libraries take solar-charged laptop computers pre-loaded with e-books and e-resources related to the school curriculum, and modem internet connections, to under-resourced schools, to give children vital hands-on computer and internet skills and access to learning materials which the schools cannot provide.

The children benefiting from the classes are in grades 1, 2 and 3. For grade 3, the libraries’ classes are especially important, because at the end of grade 3, children write the Basic Education Certificate Exam, which determines progress to secondary school. Children who complete secondary school have the potential to enter further education and to get better jobs. For children in grades 1 and 2, the classes are valuable building blocks for the future.

Reading e-books , Takyiman Presby school, Ashanti.
Reading e-books , Takyiman Presby school, Ashanti.
Ashanti Regional Mobile Librarian, Ofosu Frimpong.
Ashanti Regional Mobile Librarian, Ofosu Frimpong.

Links:

May 10, 2017

Surprise for young readers in Ethiopia!

New books surprised and delighted the children.
New books surprised and delighted the children.

There was great excitement at four public libraries in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia’s capital city, in April when each library received a consignment of 96 children’s books, bought with your generous donations.

Most of the books (a total of 384) received by Kirkos, Lideta, Kolfe Keranyo and Yeka public libraries are by African authors and published in Amharic, which is the most widely-spoken language in Addis Ababa.

Exciting new titles like The Secret Village, The Magician, The Tricky Monkey and Kukusha, the Brave Bird are now surprising and delighting hundreds of children who browse the libraries' shelves. The collection also includes history books and reference works in Amharic to help schoolchildren with their homework.

To greet the books, librarians at Kolfe Keranyo public library organized a colourful ceremony on Saturday, 29 April, attended by representatives of the Addis Ababa Culture and Tourism Bureau (which manages libraries in the city), librarians, and people from the community - grandparents, parents and children.

Librarian Solomon Bogol said: “We have recently started reading events in the library. The new books will enrich these events. Thank-you to our donors!”

Addressing the ceremony, Alemu Abebe, Library Development and Management Coordinator, of the non-governmental literacy development agency, Code-Ethiopia, spoke about the importance of family reading sessions (in which parents and children read together) for early literacy development.

In Ethiopia, the 384 books cost just US$1,010, including delivery. We have also passed on donations of US$1,010 to Kenya National Library Service and the National Library of Uganda to buy books for libraries in those countries. Stay tuned for our next report when we'll tell you what books the libraries chose and what young readers have to say about them!

Lideta public librarians receive the books.
Lideta public librarians receive the books.
Each library received 96 children's books.
Each library received 96 children's books.
 
WARNING: Javascript is currently disabled or is not available in your browser. GlobalGiving makes extensive use of Javascript and will not function properly with Javascript disabled. Please enable Javascript and refresh this page.