Pueblo a Pueblo, Inc.

Our mission is to improving the health, education and food security of families in Indigenous and rural communities in Latin America. We seek to strengthen vulnerable families by serving women and children, with an emphasis on Indigenous peoples in the Lake Atitlan region of Guatemala and other rural, coffee-growing communities in Latin America through integrated, school-based health & education programs. Pueblo a Pueblo was founded on the belief that meaningful and sustainable change requires the commitment and active involvement of the individual, community or organization that will benefit from that change. Pueblo a Pueblo strives to deepen values such as personal responsibility, se...
Jan 20, 2015

Experiences of an Organic School Gardens Educator

Since 2011, Elder Archila has been an educator for Pueblo a Pueblo’s Organic School Gardens project, a sister-project of School Lunches. A normal workday for our garden educators consists of teaching lessons on organic agriculture and the importance of a well-balanced diet to primary school-aged children in multiple public elementary schools. As our local staff come from traditional Mayan families themselves, one of the unique skills Elder brings to his work is educating schoolchildren on traditional Mayan agricultural practices. Elder loves his job and enjoys positively contributing to children’s education by sharing his passion for organic gardening. 

From his perspective, many indigenous, coffee-farming communities lack proper nutrition as well as education on healthy eating habits.

Though this is the reality, Elder has seen many positive changes in the past four years. For instance, students who have participated in this project eat more fruit now than they did before. They also gained interest and knowledge on organic agriculture, planting techniques, and the benefits of growing and eating diverse foods. With each additional year, Elder sees that the students get more and more excited when planting season begins and they take more pride in their annual harvest.

In the schools, Elder works alongside many teachers to make these classes possible. While the vast majority of teachers are supportive and encouraging, he mentioned that there are a few who do not see the importance of organic gardens in their schools. Elder is looking forward to another year of teaching organic gardening to local students, but more importantly, he hopes to gain deeper support and understanding from his partners.

Dec 23, 2014

A Change in Chacaya

It’s coffee season in Guatemala, which means children from our partner communities are spending their days hiking through the dense thickets of red coffee berries that cover the country’s rural landscape.

But in San Antonio Chacaya – a nearby community known principally for the quality of its coffee – this year’s harvest was slightly different.

Instead of heading straight for the fields, children in Chacaya this year were given permission to start their mornings at a summer literacy camp led by four local volunteers and co-hosted by Pueblo a Pueblo at the community’s primary school. For the first time ever, the project’s summer camps were over-enrolled!

For four hours each morning, fifty children between the ages of six and twelve worked to improve their reading and writing skills through activities ranging from skits and plays to arts and crafts. All activities were designed to develop students’ reading fluency, attention span, and creativity, among other skills essential for success in the classroom. 

In addition to a successful camp session, we were proud to see parents and community leaders make a conscious effort to put their children’s education first. Through its support of the school’s literacy camps, the Chacaya community made it clear to its children that education and participation in the household economy aren’t mutually exclusive priorities, but rather complementary parts of long-term strategy to improve life in the community. 

Nov 10, 2014

The Impact of our WASH Project

In our last report from August, we told you how your donations made it possible to bring new WASH facilities to three different schools in the past year, increasing our outreach to 785 students. We want to share with you what that means in terms of impact.

Recently we sat down with teachers at the Tzanchaj Primary School, one of our WASH beneficiary schools, to talk about their hygiene and sanitation facilities. They told us that since the start of the project they have seen an increase in student attendance and a decrease in child illness, especially in the prevalence of fevers and diarrhea. Additionally, the WASH activities have improved children’s overall hygiene habits and enhanced their self-esteem.

The teachers shared a story with us about a student named Paulo. Paulo, like the majority of students in Tzanchaj, comes from a poor family that doesn’t have the money to buy basic personal hygiene supplies like soap. Although his parents want him to be healthy, Paulo would come to school every day with dirty hands and fingernails.

However, due to WASH activities in school, Paulo has transformed into a model student for hand washing. He properly washes his hands with soap and water and never needs to be prompted by his teachers to wash his hands before eating and after using the bathroom. Instead, Paulo comes to school every day and shows off his hands, exhibiting their cleanliness and his higher self-confidence.  

Paulo isn’t the only student with an inspirational story. Many of the students share what they’ve learned in school with their parents and siblings, thereby creating healthier families and stronger communities. Gaspar Damian Reanda, a teacher at the Tzanchaj Primary School, has had a front row seat to the change. “This project is very important,” he told us. “We, as teachers and as a school, are very grateful to see our students taking better care of themselves.” 

A student washes his hands in Tzanchaj
A student washes his hands in Tzanchaj
 

donate now:

An anonymous donor will match all new monthly recurring donations, but only if 75% of donors upgrade to a recurring donation today.
Terms and conditions apply.
Make a monthly recurring donation on your credit card. You can cancel at any time.
Make a donation in honor or memory of:
What kind of card would you like to send?
How much would you like to donate?
  • $15
    give
  • $25
    give
  • $50
    give
  • $75
    give
  • $150
    give
  • $500
    give
  • $1,000
    give
  • $7,000
    give
  • $15
    each month
    give
  • $25
    each month
    give
  • $50
    each month
    give
  • $75
    each month
    give
  • $150
    each month
    give
  • $500
    each month
    give
  • $1,000
    each month
    give
  • $7,000
    each month
    give
  • $
    give
gift Make this donation a gift, in honor of, or in memory of someone?

Reviews of Pueblo a Pueblo, Inc.

Great Nonprofits
Read and write reviews about Pueblo a Pueblo, Inc. on GreatNonProfits.org.
WARNING: Javascript is currently disabled or is not available in your browser. GlobalGiving makes extensive use of Javascript and will not function properly with Javascript disabled. Please enable Javascript and refresh this page.