Christel House International

Christel House helps children around the world break the cycle of poverty, realize their hopes and dreams, and become self-sufficient, contributing members of society.
Aug 9, 2016

Coming Soon: A New Christel House in India

Christel House is breaking the cycle of poverty
Christel House is breaking the cycle of poverty

The reality for impoverished children in India, particularly girls, is stifling. They face insurmountable odds and are sentenced to repeat the generational cycle of poverty into which they were born.

  • An estimated 47% of women in India are married by age 181.
  • 29.8% of girls in India complete Grade 10 1.
  • Only 1 in 100 girls in India graduate from Grade 121.

Christel House has been working to break this cycle of poverty in India for 15 years. Students starting in kindergarten at Christel House India are 16 times more likely to graduate from a post-secondary education program when compared to government school students.

  • Girls with secondary schooling are 6 times less likely to be child brides than those with little or no education 3.
  • Christel House India has a 96% annual retention rate.
  • 98 in 100 students at Christel House India pass their graduation exams.

And, with your support, we want to continue the impact. We will soon open a new school in India to give even more children a brighter future.

The government of Chhattisgarh, one of India’s poorest states, is building a new school for Christel House in the city of Naya Raipur. The school is scheduled to open in the fall of 2016. Initially, it will serve 210 students in Grades K–2. Each year, the school will add one new grade level.

The government is funding construction, but Christel House will be responsible for covering the cost of student programs, teachers, books, food, health care and transportation.

For young girls living in poverty in Naya Raipur, attending Christel House will mean a free, quality education, nutrition, medical support, safe transportation to and from school and a healthy environment to learn and grow.

Your support of ‘Educate an Indian Girl-Child from the Slums’ is giving impoverished girls the opportunity to step into a classroom for the very first time. Thank you for helping to change a child’s life story.

1. The World of Indian Girls 2014 Report – Save the Children
http://resourcecentre.savethechildren.se/sites/default/files/documents/executive_summary_of_wings_2014.pdf
2. Impact at Scale, DARSA
https://www.dasra.org/insight/impact-at-scale
3. Keeping Girls in Secondary Schools, DARSA
https://www.dasra.org/cause/keeping-girls-in-secondary-schools

Rendering of the new school in Naya Raipur
Rendering of the new school in Naya Raipur

Links:

Aug 9, 2016

Christel House Mexico is Moving!

New Christel House Mexico building
New Christel House Mexico building

We have some exciting news to share. Christel House Mexico is moving to a new campus that will include a much needed high school.

On a trip to Mexico City in 1998, Christel DeHaan quickly realized that impoverished children need more than clothes and food. They need tools to help them break the cycle of poverty. Later that year, the first Christel House learning center opened in Mexico City.

Christel House Mexico, which now serves more than 400 students in grades 1–9, has outgrown its urban campus. Soon, it will move to a new facility in Tacubaya, Mexico. The new space will include bigger classrooms, sports and recreation areas, green space, better transportation access, and—most importantly—room for a much-needed high school.

Refurbishment of the school is in its final phase and the new facility will be ready for the start of school on August 15. The new building will allow us to have a greater impact, adding grades 10–12, and better serve our current students.

Your support of ‘Educate a Mexico Girl-Child from the Barrios’ is helping to make this move possible and giving impoverished girls the opportunity for a brighter future. Thank you.

New Christel House Mexico school
New Christel House Mexico school
New Christel House Mexico school
New Christel House Mexico school

Links:

Aug 9, 2016

I Owe My Dad this Degree

Zola, Christel House South Africa Graduate
Zola, Christel House South Africa Graduate

Abandoned by her mother, raised by her father, valedictorian of her graduating class and admitted to Stellenbosch University—one of Cape Town’s most prestigious institutions—heartbreak, struggle and determination mark Zola’s journey.

When Zola M. tells the 12th grade class of Christel House South Africa to get their heads in their books, they listen. The no-nonsense 24-year-old is one of Christel House South Africa’s most respected alumni, who overcame difficult circumstances to fight her way into one of the country’s top universities.

Her father, Zolile, raised her from the age of 18 months after her alcoholic mother deserted them.

“He always wanted the best for me. I am from Langa, a township known for extreme poverty, but was sent to schools in more prestigious areas even though the fees and transport costs had to be shouldered by my dad, who worked as a driver for a car dealership.”

Her father was laid off when Zola was in the 3rd grade. He struggled to keep their heads above water, she recalled.

“One day, just before I was to start Grade 4, he sat me down and explained he could no longer afford to pay for me to attend school. He promised me he would sort it out soon and until he did, I was to go to the local library every day and read.”

On every school day in 2001, Zola would be at the Langa library when it opened. Her father would join her in the afternoon and tutor her in basic math.

“My dad wasn’t an educated man. He had passed Grade 4 when he dropped out to work and provide for his family. But he believed in the power of education. He wanted the best for me.”

That year her father, who later started a small takeaway business, heard of an independent school aimed at improving the lives of needy children. He took her to Christel House South Africa.

Full scholarships

Christel House offers full scholarships, meals, transport, uniforms, textbooks and learning materials to impoverished children.

Because Zola did not have a school report for that year, she was assessed to determine in which grade she would be placed.

“I was found to be competent for Grade 5. Because of those hours in the library, I was able to skip Grade 4.”

Her years at Christel House were among her best, she remembered.

“I took part in everything – choir, public speaking, you name it; I was there.”

In Grade 12, she was named the valedictorian.

“I was in tears and almost unable to talk when I spoke of my gratitude for my father and all he had done for me. My friends later told me my dad had been just as emotional. This was weird for me. My dad never cried.”

Zola applied at a number of universities after graduation, eventually settling on studying political science at Stellenbosch University.

“I remember my dad and me taking the train to this faraway place. We were broke. He had a bank bag of 10c and 20c coins to pay for our tickets.”

“My registration and fees came to over R10,000, but my dad stood outside as I followed the registration process without the cash.”

Kept going

“He told me to tell the assistants that he was a pensioner and to show them the marks I had achieved. When I did, I was sent to see a man in the finance department. He looked at my report, nodded, and signed a slip which I had to take with me. I didn’t pay for anything that day.”

Her father was proud that his daughter was going to attend one of the top universities in the country,” Zola said, smiling.

“He wasn’t a man of many words, though. But his face said it all. The years had been stressful for him and everything was finally coming together.”

After she completed her first year, Zola’s father died at the age of 70. She lost her home where she grew up after he passed.

“I kept going, remembering all he had taught me. He always told me to speak up and to be proud of where I came from. He insisted that I never allow anyone to make me feel inferior.”

She suffered from depression in her third year and dropped out of university in 2012.

“I realised I had no one. My dad had been the one who was always there for me,” she said.

“But in the past four years since I left, I have realised that I need to go back. After all the sacrifices he made, I owe it to him and to myself to get that degree. My dad didn’t spend his last coins to get me to Stellenbosch for me to simply walk away from it. I need this.”

She hopes to complete her studies part time while working at Christel House as the executive assistant to the CEO.

She spends time encouraging pupils, especially girls, to aim high and go on to bigger and better things.

“I try to teach them to be proud of who they are and where they come from. My dad taught me that. And I believe in looking people in the eye when I tell my story. It’s who I am. I need to own it.”

(Adapted from an article written by Tammy Petersen, News24)

Zola at the Langa Library where she went to study
Zola at the Langa Library where she went to study
Zola at Christel House South Africa
Zola at Christel House South Africa
Zola visiting the Langa community
Zola visiting the Langa community

Links:

 
   

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