Jul 5, 2020

Summer Update 2020

Photo credit: Yair Ben-Ari
Photo credit: Yair Ben-Ari

After nearly two months of closure due to the covid-19 virus restrictions, the Zoo re-opened in mid-May under certain restrictions.

Special precautions have been put in place to protect both visitors and staff alike: face masks are mandatory at all times; special disinfection of handrails, public restrooms and other areas; closure of water fountains, indoor exhibits and exhibits with crawling tunnels (such as the prairie dogs).

Additionally, the Zoo has added a number of special stations for hand washing and water-bottle filling with non-touch, infra-red technology.

The Zoo's tigers, Avigdor and Hannah, have been enjoying the quiet but unfortunately it does not seem to have resulted in a pregnancy for Hannah. 

Hannah is now over sixteen years old so her chances of having a healthy pregnancy are beginning to decrease.

Take care and stay safe, 

Rachael and the Tiger Tea,

Jul 2, 2020

Summer Update

After nearly two months of closure due to the covid-19 virus restrictions, the Zoo re-opened in mid-May under certain restrictions.

Special precautions have been put in place to protect both visitors and staff alike: face masks are mandatory at all times; special disinfection of handrails, public restrooms and other areas; closure of water fountains, indoor exhibits and exhibits with crawling tunnels (such as the prairie dogs).

Additionally, the Zoo has added a number of special stations for hand washing and water-bottle filling with non-touch, infra-red technology.

The Negev tortoises live in the Small Animal House which is still closed to visitors and they are enjoying the quiet.

Overall, we have had three new hatchings that hatched over the past few months.

Unfortunately, one was unwell and taken for treatment at the Zoo's veterinary clinic where it died.

There is still one more egg waiting to hatch and is showing signs that it is viable.

Stay safe and healthy, 

 

Rachael and the Tortoise Team

Jul 2, 2020

Summer Update

Hi Otter Fans, 

You may remember some time ago we reported about the studies being done on the otters by the students of the Zoo Matriculation Program - well the results are back and this is what we have learnt:

The study primarily looked at the relationship between the hormone levels of the otters and their behavior, which was monitored by cameras set up in their enclosure.

The study found that the otters had regular hormone cycles and were found to be physiologically healthy in veterinary checks.

No connection as found between the hormone levels and behavior.

No copulation or sexual behavior was observed as a result of higher hormone levels.

So, unfortunately, we are no closer to solving the mystery of why we have not succeeded in breeding this species. More studies will be needed.

Keep well and stay safe, 

 

Rachael and the Otter Team.

 

 
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