Mar 5, 2018

Sizzling Summer

Support feeding Rainbow Lorikeets
Support feeding Rainbow Lorikeets

This summer has seen record numbers of animals go through our rehabilitation facility as it has been one of the driest summers in a very long time.

The wallabies seem to be particularly affected and are getting themselves into a bit of trouble venturing into areas they normally wouldn't trying to find food.

One such wallaby "Abby" came in to our care when she was found in a suburban backyard with a neck wound. After darting and capturing her, the vet examined the wound and it appears that she may have damaged her neck trying to put her head through a fence to get to the nicely watered grass and plants on the other side.

After her examination by the vet, Abby required surgery and was then placed into our quarantine area at the rehabilitation facility so we could continue to treat and monitor her and ensure she was eating well. One month on, she had fully recovered from her injury and was able to be released back to her natural habitat. Your donations towards the rehabilitation facility have made this possible.

We have also seen the effect of the dry summer on the many of our other native animals. For the fruit and nectar eating birds there isn't a lot of blossoms or berries available, for the carnivore birds, there are fewer insects and prey. Even the bandicoots are finding it harder to dig for insects, as the ground is soo compact and hard due to the lack of rain.

We have had to supplement and support feed all of the animals in our rehabilitation facility to make sure they have sufficient strength to continue to build their strength and prepare for release. This comes at a significant cost to Sydney Wildlife. This has resulted in some animals requiring a longer stay at the facility until the food supply in their natural habit has improved.

Your ongoing donations help us to continue to provide the best possible support for these animals in their journey back to the wild.

Abby after being released.
Abby after being released.
Tawny dinner at 10pm still 40 degrees C
Tawny dinner at 10pm still 40 degrees C
Birds eating supplimentary food
Birds eating supplimentary food
Feb 23, 2018

So Long, Summer, and Thanks for All the Bats!

Pups at Kukundi (photo by Fiona)
Pups at Kukundi (photo by Fiona)

What a season! We've all heaved a huge sigh of relief here in Sydney, Summer wasn't as harsh here this year for our flying-foxes as it was in other parts of the country- a small blessing for most Sydney bats, but then the weather hasn't been as kind to other camps.

We did have a fair few heat stress events occur along the East Coast however, with our Parramatta, Emu Plains and Campbelltown camps being effected the most- we had 62 pups into care in Sydney Wildlife from those areas- way more than we'd like, but much less than camps up in Queensland, those poor animals.

All up this season, we've had 122 pups come through Kukundi facillity, 27 were released a couple weeks ago, with another 40 ready to be released this weekend; the pups are transfered from our flight aviary to a secret location in Ku-Ring-Gai National Park, the release aviary has a big hatch on one side that is opened to allow the juveniles to come out into the bush and to fly out when they're ready. We supplement feed them, in case they're a bit shy at first, but eventually they find the sky on their own! The next lot of pups will be ready to be moved from Kukundi into the flight aviary soon.

It isn't just pups we have at kukundi, however! We also have a large aviary where adults are kept for the last bit of their rehabilitation before release; we've had a monstrous netting season this year, unfortunately, and it's not just the juveniles that get themselves into trouble.

If you have fruit trees in your yard, you should definitely make sure you're using wildlife friendly netting to protect your crops, as well as your local wildlife! Here is a fantastic site with some great recommendations for what to look for in picking out some safe wildlife friendly netting.

I want to thank all our amazing supporters for everything they have done to help the pups this season! We're 100% run by busy volunteer bat slaves, and there's no way we could do it without YOU! Your generousity is integral to caring for and eventually releasing this pivotal keystone species back into the wild where they belong!

THANK YOU!! And best wishes for the new year!!

Georgina

PS. I'm attaching some adorable pictures taken by Fiona, one of our Bat Slave Managers at Kukundi. Enjoy!

Pups at Kukundi (photo by Fiona)
Pups at Kukundi (photo by Fiona)
Pups at Kukundi (photo by Fiona)
Pups at Kukundi (photo by Fiona)
Dec 5, 2017

From rescue to release

Darted Eastern Grey Kangaroo
Darted Eastern Grey Kangaroo

Since opening the rehabilitation facility years ago, we have certainly had a variety of animals come through.  We wanted to share with you a couple of unique stories of visitors we have had to the facility in the last few months.

We received a call to the Sydney Wildlife hotline about a large eastern grey kangaroo that was in a suburban backyard.  The member of the public said that it always appeared at 7:30am each day so suggested that was a good time for us to try to catch this poor kangaroo to relocate to a more suitable area.  Early the next morning, two Sydney Wildlife volunteers arrived at the location to be ready for the kangaroos visit.  As it is a wild kangaroo, it was decided the safest way of capturing it was to use a dart gun to reduce the stress on the animal as well as ensure we were able to catch it quickly.

As expected, at 7:30 the kangaroo appeared and one of our experienced macropod carers was able to dart her on the first attempt.  Once the drugs took effect and she was sedated, we were able to put her in a large macropod bag and transport her to the rehabilitation facility allowing her to wake up in safety and we could assess her condition and behaviour. 

After a few days of observation to ensure she was feeding correctly, was in good health and not showing any signs of odd behaviour she was able to be released into the company of a wild mob of Eastern Grey Kangaroos.

Our facilities have proven to be excellent for some species in their rehabilitation phase to the point where they never want to leave.

One bandicoot in the large aviary was unable to be found when we were trying to catch her for release. After two attempts of a few people each time trying to find the bandicoot with no luck, we were puzzled.  We knew she was in there as the food was being eaten and there were small freshly dug holes around the floor of the enclosure from her searching for and eating insects. We decided to put a camera in the aviary to make sure that it was in fact the bandicoot eating the food.

The cameras showed after just one night that it was in fact a very healthy bandicoot.

Now more determined than ever to catch the bandicoot three Sydney Wildlife volunteers spent well over half an hour tryng to find the bandicoot and just when we were about to give up one of the volunteers disturbed her out of a very well camouflaged nest.

Being able to provide such a natural enclosure enabled the bandicoot to exhibit its survival techniques which resulted in her being able to evade captured for soo long even though we knew it was there.

This is a testament to how your ongoing support and generosity allows us to provide these animals with such a good foundation for a successful release. 

Resident Roo watching the visitor wake up
Resident Roo watching the visitor wake up
Exploring the rehab facility
Exploring the rehab facility
Elusive bandicoot found on camera
Elusive bandicoot found on camera
 
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