May 23, 2018

Kukundi gets a break this Winter!

Bellingen Camp (Taken by G.Binns)
Bellingen Camp (Taken by G.Binns)

Dearest Amazing Supporters,

It's beginning to get frosty here in Sydney, but I'm still hearing the flying foxes arguing over blossoms in the eucalypts above my apartment building, which is across the National Park from Kukundi Rehab facility. It seems not all the flying sky puppies have left yet to travel north for warmer weather, and thats probably due to warmer than normal temperatures the last few months.

We've had about 150 adult and juvenile grey-headed flying-foxes through the facility in the last three months. These gorgeous animals still manage to get themselves into trouble through various means, such as getting caught in fruit tree nets, or just ending up in strange situations, such as getting stuck inside human houses. The last round of adults are about to come through the facility and hopefully into the release aviary in the next couple of weeks, which means that Kukundi will actually close down for a period this winter! OMG!

This is not only exciting for the majority of our volunteers that get to have a rest before the next pup season, but it's also GREAT NEWS for the facility, because we have all sorts of excellent and important maintenance jobs planned! Most of it involves new coats of hardcore washable paint, new climbing implements to string up for future guests and repairs to mesh and roofing, but we're also hoping to hear we have the go-ahead to build our new cool room to store fruit. This will cool room will save us money and time and also fruit in the long run, so wish us luck!

Any Flying-foxes that come into care over winter get the supreme luxury of hanging out with carers at their home and getting horribly spoiled with fruit to heal up for release when spring comes back. They're the first guests to enjoy the sparkling, like-new aviaries, before their eventual release.

I recently had the chance to visit the Bellingen Camp up on the north coast of New South Wales, I'll attach some pictures. Whenever I visit one of the camps, I like to believe that one or two up in those trees probably are one, or know a fellow bat that has been cared for and released by a carer somewhere; its so lovely to think that these animals are free and that we can all help them to be so, in some small way.

Whether it's from rescue or care, volunteering or donating money, or even just having wildlife-safe netting on our backyard fruit trees, every little bit helps. And we can't do it without your support!

THANK YOU!!

Georgina

This gentleman is happy to see you. (G.Binns)
This gentleman is happy to see you. (G.Binns)
Flying free. Just what we want! (G.Binns)
Flying free. Just what we want! (G.Binns)
Hanging out in the sun. (G.Binns)
Hanging out in the sun. (G.Binns)
More Bellingen Camp. (G.Binns)
More Bellingen Camp. (G.Binns)
May 17, 2018

Rehabilitation - 5 years in the making

You have helped Spike the Echidna
You have helped Spike the Echidna

To celebrate 5 years of the "Rehabilitating Wallabies and Other Native Wildlife" project, we thought we would share with you how far we have come since the beginning.  We really wouldn’t be able to do what we do without your generosity.

Since we began back in April 2013, we have received a whopping 333 donations totaling $17,009.  We can't thank you all enough as even the smallest donations help.

As the donations came in, it enabled us to purchase building materials and, over time, expand the number of enclosures in the facility allowing us to take in more animals for rehabilitation.  We started off the facility with one rehabilitation area for macropods, which has now doubled in size and includes a padded quarantine room and a small-enclosed area for injured animals needing daily treatment making it easier to handle them.  Over the last 5 years, we have built an additional 8 enclosures allowing us to take in larger quantities and varieties of species.  

By having the variety of different enclosures now, we are able to offer around 25 animals a month the chance to spend time in the facility, to build up their strength, recover from their injuries and return to the wild fit and healthy to continue living the life they were before being injured and needing our help.  As a true testament to the success of the facility, none of the animals we have microchipped prior to release have returned into care due to not coping in the wild. 

Not only have we been able to build the enclosures but you have made it possible to buy food and formulas required and pay vet bills when needed. 

In the next 5 years we hope to continue to improve on our successes and make our facility an even better one for our precious wildlife. 

Design and Build
Design and Build
Enclosure finished and in use
Enclosure finished and in use
Swamp wallabies enjoying their browse
Swamp wallabies enjoying their browse
Is part of an old aviary in the weeds?
Is part of an old aviary in the weeds?
Found, fixed and now replanting.
Found, fixed and now replanting.
Mar 5, 2018

Sizzling Summer

Support feeding Rainbow Lorikeets
Support feeding Rainbow Lorikeets

This summer has seen record numbers of animals go through our rehabilitation facility as it has been one of the driest summers in a very long time.

The wallabies seem to be particularly affected and are getting themselves into a bit of trouble venturing into areas they normally wouldn't trying to find food.

One such wallaby "Abby" came in to our care when she was found in a suburban backyard with a neck wound. After darting and capturing her, the vet examined the wound and it appears that she may have damaged her neck trying to put her head through a fence to get to the nicely watered grass and plants on the other side.

After her examination by the vet, Abby required surgery and was then placed into our quarantine area at the rehabilitation facility so we could continue to treat and monitor her and ensure she was eating well. One month on, she had fully recovered from her injury and was able to be released back to her natural habitat. Your donations towards the rehabilitation facility have made this possible.

We have also seen the effect of the dry summer on the many of our other native animals. For the fruit and nectar eating birds there isn't a lot of blossoms or berries available, for the carnivore birds, there are fewer insects and prey. Even the bandicoots are finding it harder to dig for insects, as the ground is soo compact and hard due to the lack of rain.

We have had to supplement and support feed all of the animals in our rehabilitation facility to make sure they have sufficient strength to continue to build their strength and prepare for release. This comes at a significant cost to Sydney Wildlife. This has resulted in some animals requiring a longer stay at the facility until the food supply in their natural habit has improved.

Your ongoing donations help us to continue to provide the best possible support for these animals in their journey back to the wild.

Abby after being released.
Abby after being released.
Tawny dinner at 10pm still 40 degrees C
Tawny dinner at 10pm still 40 degrees C
Birds eating supplimentary food
Birds eating supplimentary food
 
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