Jun 26, 2019

Discovering Sydney Wildlife

Long nose bandicoot by Peter Sharp
Long nose bandicoot by Peter Sharp

Thanks to Rebecca and her team, we are able to give you a visual insight into the world of Sydney Wildlife and our rehabilitation facility that you have helped to build with your generous donations. 

Below is a link to a video that will show you some of the animals that come into our care, give you a look at several of the enclosures at the rehabilitation facility currently in use by a variety of animals and hear directly from some of our dedicated volunteers.

https://youtu.be/6IZ4Gqzhltw

Rescuing and rehabilitating wildlife is only part of the service that Sydney Wildlife provides.  We offer a 24 hour rescue and advice phone service to the public which is manned 100% by volunteers.  The calls we receive range from people with questions about how they can support wildlife in their backyards through to injured wildlife needing rescuing and veterinary treatment.  

We also offer and educational service to the community to give them information and increase awareness about how to live in harmony with our vast array of wonderful wildlife.  

Feather tail glider by Peter Sharp
Feather tail glider by Peter Sharp
Eastern Grey Kangaroo by Peter Sharp
Eastern Grey Kangaroo by Peter Sharp

Links:

Jun 10, 2019

Winter Release

Corralled bats ready for catch-up
Corralled bats ready for catch-up

We are in for another long season this year as we still have plenty of adult and juvenile bats in care waiting to go through the release facility's large flight aviary at Kukundi. These bats have come into care for a variety of reasons, but the major cause is from being entangled in netting that is used in backyards to protect fruit trees from wildlife. Unfortunately the majority of the netting used has inappropriate mesh size (too large) which means bats and other wildlife are easily entangled.

There is a lengthy process of rehabilitation that each bat needs to go through, with the last part of their rehab journey in the large cage getting flight fit before release. Once in the cage they are given 2 to 3 weeks to build up strength and muscle tone. Before we open that hatch we do a "catch up" where each bat is caught, examined and flight tested. Those that don't pass are brought back into care and for the rest the hatch of the cage is opened. We support feed for as long as required -  and it can sometimes take weeks for the bats to have all left the cage.  Once gone they have all gone the hatch is closed and the process is stared over again for the next lot of bats.

We probably have at least two more rounds of bats going through before we can hopefully close the facility for a well earned break and get some maintenance work done.

Examination of bat before flight test
Examination of bat before flight test
Flight test and we are good to go!
Flight test and we are good to go!
Apr 12, 2019

The word is getting out

Feather Tail Glider
Feather Tail Glider

As a result of the work done by our Sydney Wildlife volunteers, the companies that volunteer their time and the local community support, the word is getting out about the magnificent work Sydney Wildlife is doing at the rehabilitation facility to give the animals that come in to care the best possible chance of a successful release back into their native habitat.

To assist in increasing the awareness of the different types of native animals we care for, the habitat they live in and the dangers they face, a local photographer, Peter Sharp from Tame and Wild Studios, has volunteered his services to capture some wonderful images of Australian wildlife rescued by Sydney Wildlife Carers.  The images are used by our volunteers when doing educational talks giving the general public a chance to see up close what our wildlife looks like when normally you would only see glimpses of them at night time.  

The quality of the images allows us to explain and show the features of these animals and help with identification without the need for live animals to be present at the talk.

A good example of this is the feather tail glider.  We are able to show how it gets its name from its feather like tail.  We can also show examples of baby animals that are normally not seen outside of the mothers pouch.  This is extremely useful when educating the public on what to do should they come across an injured animal that happens to have a baby joey in its pouch.

We wanted to share with some of the magnificent images Peter has captured for us of our unique Australia Native Wildlife.  

www.tameandwildstudio.com

Thank you to all of our supporters that continue to donate to our project allowing us to keep making a difference.

Death Adder
Death Adder
Tawny Frogmouth
Tawny Frogmouth
Brush Tail Possum
Brush Tail Possum
Echidna
Echidna
Wombat Joeys
Wombat Joeys
 
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