Jun 1, 2014

DON'T LET ME STARVE UPDATE

Cloudy and friend Quagmire enjoying rehabilitation
Cloudy and friend Quagmire enjoying rehabilitation

Cloudy the Eastern Grey Kangaroo, who was found malnourished to the point that he couldn’t stand, is now in the rehabilitation area your donations have helped us build.

Cloudy has now joined 3 other Macropods (kangaroos and Wallabies) keeping him company in the rehabilitation area. He has a long way to go but is slowly improving in his health and mental state.

Our Global Giving donors should be very proud of themselves, as through your donations we have been able to rehabilitate 7 Macropods since starting the project.

THANK YOU SO MUCH

Unfortunately we had another Eucalyptus tree fall, severely damaging one of the fences. Luckily our corporate volunteers have worked very hard and replaced the fence so our beautiful Macropods could not escape or hurt themselves. Trees are an essential part of the landscape providing shade, shelter and food for our precious native animals in the area.

Word is out about Sydney Wildlife's fantastic work at Waratah Park. We are pleased to advise that other companies, such as Bunnings Warehouse, have volunteered time and equipment, with their current project being to paint part of the facility we use to prepare the animals food.

 We are very proud of what we have achievd so far, let us know your thoughts on our projects wall.

Our wonderful Volunteers
Our wonderful Volunteers
Fixing the fence
Fixing the fence
Dell, Jack, Quagmire and Cloudy.
Dell, Jack, Quagmire and Cloudy.
Mar 3, 2014

Please Don't Let Me Starve!

Cloudy thin and lethargic
Cloudy thin and lethargic

This little kangaroo's name is Cloudy, he was found in one of Sydneys Northern suburbs starving, so weak that he couldn’t stand up.

Thanks to your donations and the Volunteer carers hard work Cloudy is now recovering well and in a few months will be able to move into the rehabilitation facility.

To help an animal like Cloudy to survive it takes a lot of care. As he'd had no food for a long period of time and needed fluid injections to hydrate him we needed to feed him small amounts often and the formula needed to be diluted as his stomach would not cope with full strength.

He was kept quiet and needed heat for shock initially even though it was very warm in Sydney when Cloudy came into care.

Once the formula started to work and he put on some weight the formula strength was increased and the feeding frequency decreased.

Now a couple of months later we have an active and much healthier joey that can not only stand but hop around.

We have continued to work on the rehabilitation area with volunteers lifting heavy rubber to finish the walls in the Quarantine area, (which I might add looks great). It is so good to now have a facility to enable us to take in injured adult Macropods where they wont further hurt them selves on hard surfaces while they are being treated.

 

Maintenance of the area is continuous by our corporate volunteers with planting, weeding and watering of native bushes that provide food for the Macropods, also regularly mowing of the surrounding areas.

We feel blessed to have so many wonderful volunteers helping us achieve our goal.

Watering the Plants
Watering the Plants
Cleaning up around the plants
Cleaning up around the plants
Having a well earned break
Having a well earned break
Dell is growing big and strong.
Dell is growing big and strong.
Dec 4, 2013

Swapping Business Suits For Gardening Gloves

EY Volunteers
EY Volunteers

Global Professional Services giant, EY (formerly Ernst & Young) sent a team of professionals to the wilds of “Waratah Park” to get their hands/faces/reputations dirty in a bid to help our beautiful Australian native wildlife.

40+ members of staff ditched their business suits, cappuccinos and lap-tops for tick-spray, gardening gloves and sensible foot-wear to weed, build enclosures and mend fences.

After lunch, the volunteers were treated to a Wildlife Presentation by members of Sydney Wildlife. Many educational animals such as blue-tongue lizards, bearded dragons, carpet pythons and other snakes helped break down barriers with the volunteers. 

All in all, a very successful and enjoyable day! One enthusiastic worker was overheard saying: “I’m definitely coming back here again to help. And I’m bringing the whole family! It’s so nice to be able to make a measurable contribution.”

Unfortunately our volunteers have not been able to complete our quarrantine room yet, sadly due to high demand of  sick and injured wallabies requiring this space for treatment.

We presently have an adult male wallaby with one side of his face very swollen. As he is located in the quarrantine area, it is possible to catch him daily and give him antibiotic injections to reduce the swelling. At this point he is making good progress with the swelling subsiding.

Dell (the Eastern Grey Kangaroo from the naming competition) is also old enough now to start her rehabilitation in the grassed enclosure learning to be less dependant on human interaction.

On my daily visit to feed and treat the above macropods I was shocked to find that a large gum tree had fallen onto the macropod fence narrowly missing the quarrantine room and macropods in the yard. The tree had taken down the fence making it possible for the animals to escape, luckily they didn't. We called on the State Emergency Sevices to quickly remove the tree and allow us to rebuild the fence, thanks to this other voluntary organisation it was done that day.

We would like to thank you all for your wonderful support duing 2013 and wish you and your Family all the best for the festive season.

Adult Swamp Wallaby with swollen face
Adult Swamp Wallaby with swollen face
Dell enjoying the rehabilitation area.
Dell enjoying the rehabilitation area.
The tree
The tree
State Emergency Services after tree removal.
State Emergency Services after tree removal.
Merry Christmas
Merry Christmas
 
WARNING: Javascript is currently disabled or is not available in your browser. GlobalGiving makes extensive use of Javascript and will not function properly with Javascript disabled. Please enable Javascript and refresh this page.