May 11, 2020

A Tale of 2 Wombats

MJ and Mitch
MJ and Mitch

In January this year, two wombats came into our care from Wildlife Rescue South Coast (WRSC) as the fires had wiped out many of their members houses and their animal enclosures. We were happy to help these WRSC members by looking after not only these wombats but many other animals from the fire grounds until they were back on their feet and able to care for them again.

These two wombats were named Michael Jackson (MJ for short) because he had one white foot and other was called Mitch.  MJ had smoke inhalation problems and Mitch had burns along his back.  When they came into our care they were both small and frightened after all they had been through.

During their time being hand raised by a Sydney Wildlife Volunteer, MJ had to have chest x-rays and oxygen treatment for the smoke inhalation but recovered very well and quite quickly.

Mitch on the other hand had burns and sores on his back, one of the sores turned into a lump that needed a further vet check, needle aspiration and antibiotics. After treatment, the lump went down but did not disappear completely. The vets thought it was probably fibrous tissue but wanted us to keep an eye on it as may indicate the possibility of a small foreign body under skin that they could not find.  

 After one and half months the lump started to grow larger.  In 2 days, it burst and after taking him straight to the vets, it needed to be operated on. The vets found a large abscess and proceeded to remove the damaged tissue and cleaned it thoroughly. Once again, Mitch was on antibiotics in conjunction with daily flushing of the wound and laser treatment to enhance the healing.

In just over three weeks Mitch's large abscess hole had healed up beautifully and he was given the all clear to go back to the south coast to start the next stage of his rehabilitation before his eventual release back into the wild.

The south coast at the end of April looked very different to when we were down there treating burnt wildlife in January. It is now lush and green after the floods and there is once again plenty of food for any wildlife that may have survived the fires.

I hope these two gorgeous wombats continue to grow up big and strong then give the other wombats in their area a run for their money once released.

A week after they both arrived, still not relaxed.
A week after they both arrived, still not relaxed.
Laser treatment
Laser treatment
Oxygen for smoke inhalation
Oxygen for smoke inhalation
Mar 23, 2020

What a season!

Weekly weigh & measure
Weekly weigh & measure

What a bat season this has been!

Following the bushfires which wiped out critical food habitat and led to a mass abandonment of pups due to starving mothers; then the mass mortalities from extreme heat, and then torrential rain and flooding with trees collapsing and power lines down, bats getting entangled in fruit netting - it has been really, really busy with bat rescues.

We opened Kukundi crèche for our flying-fox pups early January 2020. Every week we have been doing a general health check of all the pups in the crèche. They are weighed and their forearm is measured. We also look over each pup, check the condition of their wing membrane and joints and general behaviour. As each weeks passes, we watch them progress through the dehumanising process, until they reach the stage (usually after about 5 weeks in crèche) where they are ready to move into our releases cage which is located in the bush not far from a flying fox camp. It is from here we eventually open the hatch of the cage so that they can be free and join the local camp.

Since January, we have been able to release over 90 pups back into the wild, with another 40 ready to go next weekend. It has been such a busy season with more than normal numbers of pups coming into care. More pups’ means more fruit required. We have had wonderful support from one of our major supermarkets (Woolworths) donating many weeks of fruit (over 220 kgs of apple and pears each week) for our flying foxes in care. We have had a local primary school that was learning about the environment, collect fruit and donate to us also. We have had other donations of bat wraps; syringes and other bat care items from many different people and groups, which we are truly grateful for.

One exciting development down at Kukundi, our release facility at Lane Cove National Park, was getting the cool room up and running for this season. This has meant we have been able to store fruit and minimise loss due to spoilage – something that we really needed this season with so many mouths to feed.

Thank you so much for all your generous donations that enable us to continue to rescue, rehabilitate and release back into the wild our beautiful bats. We could not do it without your help.

Cheers

Fiona Bassett

Project Manager

Measuring forearm
Measuring forearm
Pups in care
Pups in care
New cool room
New cool room
Operational cool room!
Operational cool room!
More pups in care
More pups in care
Feb 11, 2020

Fire to Flood

Treated burnt feet
Treated burnt feet

Sydney Wildlife have been very busy lately as I am sure you can imagine.  Besides going to the fire grounds with our Mobile Care Unit, we have also been looking after fire affected wildlife and providing support to other wildlife organisations. 

https://www.abc.net.au/radio/programs/the-signal/what-the-fires-did-to-animals/11895108

One of our members commandeered a plane that was going to Kangaroo Island.  Kangaroo Island has also been badly affected by the recent fires. 

Lorraine (Sydney Wildlife Volunteer) had the great idea on Friday afternoon to fill up the private plane that was headed to Kangaroo Island the following Tuesday with much needed supplies. Lorraine got in contact with the Ranger who advised that RSPCA were in charge of the rescue efforts on Kangaroo Island and the emphasis was feeders, boxes, pouches, medical supplies and feeding/water equipment. The supplies were needed mostly for smaller mammals, reptiles and birds so Margaret (Sydney Wildlife Volunteer) posted on a number of Facebook groups asking for help and contacted our support team at ARC (Animal Rescue Cooperative).  In just 3 days the Sydney Wildlife volunteers had sourced, collected and filled the plane with much needed supplies.

Mission accomplished!!  Once the plane landed, all the feeders, watering systems, possum boxes and medical supplies asked for were handed to the RSPCA to use and distribute to other wildlife groups.

In another fire related trip we ended up in Lithgow where we were part of a search and rescue team comprising of people from RSPCA, Animals Australia, World Vets, WIRES and of course Sydney Wildlife Rescue.

Sydney Wildlife have also had the honour of working with Dr Oakley (Yukon Vet), Dr Peyton and her husband and Professor Johnson, all the way from the USA.  

Working with Wildlife Rescue South Coast again we have been able to check up on our original patients to see their progress over the past weeks and do some new fish skin treatments on their burns that Dr Jamie applied. 

Dr Peyton is an award-winning burns specialist who is using ground-breaking methods on burns victims: 
https://lindsaywildlife.org/…/september-2019-conservation-…/

You can watch Dr Oakley on Yukon Vet:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BAigNvayIXY

It has been a horrible and heart breaking summer here in Australia but gladly as I sit here today writing this it is raining heavily which I hope puts out all the fires and fills our dams.

Thank you all for your continued and wonderful support as we can't do what we do without your donations.

Signs praying for rain & thanking fire fighters.
Signs praying for rain & thanking fire fighters.
New fish skin treatment really helped
New fish skin treatment really helped
Wombat on oxygen for smoke inhalation
Wombat on oxygen for smoke inhalation
Dr Oakley with Joeys WRSC
Dr Oakley with Joeys WRSC
Orphans
Orphans

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