Sydney Wildlife

Our mission is to rescue, rehabilitate and release Australian native animals, and to educate the community, at all levels, about the need to protect our native animals and to preserve their habitats.
Dec 13, 2016

Tinkerbell

Tinkerbell the Feathertail Glider (pictured) came into care at only 2gms with eyes closed after being found on a driveway.

She grew quickly which was great as it meant the 2 hourly feeds thoughout the night only lasted for a month.

While Tinkerbell was being handraised, two other Feather tail gliders came into my care so she was able to have company and a small group was formed.

When large enough, all 3 gliders were taken to our rehabilitation facility, that your donations helped build, and they started to learn how to behave and feed them selves for when released back into the wild.

I am happy to say after 2 months in rehabilitation they were all very fit and ready to be released so we released them in their little group.

It is always a good feeling when you have been able to hand raise animals to the point that they can be releasd back into their natural habitat.

Thank you for your support.

I hope you enjoy the festive season.

Kind regards Joan

Dec 7, 2016

Thank you and next steps

Bats flying out at sunset from our local colony.
Bats flying out at sunset from our local colony.

Hi everyone

This report is to let you know some good news, and to let you know about the next steps.

The good news, no the great news is- thanks to you incredibly generous donors - we have fully funded our new creche cage!  We are all super grateful for your ongoing commitment, which has allowed us to provide the best possible care that we can to our baby bats.

The less good news, is that this season is shaping up to be a shocker for bats. There have been food shortages all along the east coast, and some days we have had as many as 12 bat calls in a day. This is really challenging for our team of volunteers. The sheer numbers, and the fact that we also have to work, eat and sleep ourselves, has been difficult for many people. The food shortages are related to the El Nino cycle, and the summer is also predicted to be very hot, so I suspect we may have to watch out for heat stress events also.

Life is not easy for our little bats.

Because of this, we have decided to extend our funding goal. The cage is now fully funded, but we are hoping you may still be interested in helping to fund the new electronic bat alert system  (which gets all rescuers to bats in crisis as soon as we know about them so they get rescued faster), food (they eat. A lot!)  veterinary expenses, and emergency kits to cope with heat stress events. I know money is tight, and of course we understand if you feel you have done your bit in funding the cage. Which is quite true and very much appreciated!

But the truth is that the demands of rescue carers never stop. While animals need us, we will also need help. I hope that  you will continue to find this a worth project.

One final point- I am handing over this stage of the project to a new Bat Slave, Georgina Binns. So a personal thank you from me, and good luck to George with helping out on this wonderful project.

Have a safe safe holiday and a very happy new year. There are a lot of bats flying out wild now because of your help. I thought you might appreciate my last photo being one of freedom rather than a bat in care, so I hope you enjoy it. This photo is part of the flyout of about 20 000 bats from our local colony, as they head off for a night of food and exploration with their friends and family.

A great example to follow, at this time of year.

Many thanks, and have a peaceful 2017.

Nov 17, 2016

The Wombat Warrior

Mulan Wombat Warrior
Mulan Wombat Warrior

Mulan's mum was hit by a car south of Sydney and sadly didn't survive.  A caring bypasser stopped to check on the wombat and discovered she had a little joey in her pouch.  As they were on their way to Sydney, they collected the joey, put it in their car and continued on their trip.  Once in Sydney, they took the joey to a vet close to their home and the vet then contacted Sydney Wildlife to organise a carer for her.  

Unfortunately, that was only the beginning of the battle for little Mulan.

When she arrived she was approximately 3 months old, weighed only 600 grams and was very sick.  She developed septacemia (blood infection) in the first couple of days and had to be rushed to an after hours vet to have a cannula put in her arm as she was too sick to drink her formula and was quickly dehydrating and loosing her fight against this horrible infection.

She was given fluids through the cannula by her carer every 2 hours for 48 hours and on day 3 we started to introduce oral fluids and still use the cannula to top up her fluid intake.  On day 4 we were able to remove the cannula as she was now able to take enough formula from her bottle feeds every 2 hours.  During this time she was also on 3 injections a day of antibiotics and painkillers.

Mulan won the fight and continued to grow and be an active little wombat doing all the right things for her age.  

Until she was around 1.6kgs in weight and suddenly she started refusing her bottles.  This lead us to beleive she may have had a serious stomach or intestinal issue.  After many vet visits and various xrays and treatments to try and find the problem it was decided to do a laparotomy (incision into the abdominal cavity). Luckily there was no twisting of the bowel but they discovered the lymph glands were enlarged and she also had gut stasis. She then went back onto fluids and commenced a course of laxitives, pain killing injections, antibiotic injections and after 10 days of intensive care and daily checkups Mulan was showing remarkable improvement.  

Once again Mulan the Wombat Warrior won her battle against the odds.  

She is continuing to eat well, enjoy her bottles and be a normal active wombat joey. We are hopeful that she has now fought her last battle and can enjoy the rest of her time in care before eventually going to our rehab facility to prepare her for release.

Feeding through cannula
Feeding through cannula
Getting ready for surgery
Getting ready for surgery
Mulan
Mulan's surgery scar
Mulan now enjoying life
Mulan now enjoying life
 
   

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