Dec 30, 2020

Exquisite

Adam at 2 gms
Adam at 2 gms

Look at this exquisite and perfect little face. It belongs to an animal that very few people have heard about and many often confuse for a mouse:

• They are the smallest carnivorous marsupials (mammals that carry their offspring in a pouch)

• They are the world’s smallest semelparous mammal (meaning that the males die after their first and only breeding season at around 11months old)

• The family group into which they fall (Dasyuridae) also includes quolls and Tasmanian Devils 

* Females give birth to undeveloped naked young that latch onto teats in the pouch for up to 50 days.

The animal in question is an antechinus.

This little one has been named Adam Ant-echinus. He had become separated from his family group and was found all by himself, weighing in at a massive 2 grams (0.07 of an ounce)! Their snout grows relatively long and narrow as they grow and gives them a shrew like appearence.

Most species nest communially in tree hollows comming out at night to prey on insects, spiders, centipedes and sometimes small frogs. Species vary with adults weighing between 16 - 170gms (0.56 - 6 ounces).

Quite a few of our carers have been called out to rescue these tiny joeys recently and they are all being hand-raised for release when they are older. Adam now weighs 12 grams (0.5 ounces) and has a few more weeks in care.  He will then be released back where he was found by the National Parks ranger that bought him to Sydney Wildlife for hand raising.

Thank you, Margaret, for these gorgeous photos of our little Adam.

On behalf of Sydney Wildlife we would like to thank you for your support during 2020 and wish you a happy and healthy 2021.

Sleeping
Sleeping
Feeding
Feeding
Adam at 12 grams and never still
Adam at 12 grams and never still
Dec 1, 2020

Spring 2020 Report

Dear Supporters

With the end of season shut down at our release facility, Kukundi, we have been busy over the last few weekends carrying out maintenance work. This has included weeding, laying pavers for a new pathway, painting our fruit prep rooms and general cage maintenance.  We will be opening both the adult cage and pup crèche cage again early January 2021. We still have adults in care from earlier this year that did not make it to our release cage and as pup season is in full swing, we will have pups around 12 weeks of ages that need to go into crèche in January. 

There has been a steady number of pups coming into care so far this season. At the present moment I have 6 pups in care, ages ranging from 2 weeks old to 8 weeks old. The youngest is still on 5 milk feeds a day, whilst the oldest boy is now on an airer fulltime, self feeding milk and starting to really enjoy his fruit. He still however, still loves a cuddle from his “mum”.

Thank you so much for all your generous donations that enable us to continue to rescue, rehabilitate and release back into the wild our beautiful flying foxes. We couldn’t do it without your help. 

Cheers

Fiona Bassett

Sep 4, 2020

The Aftermath

The Orphans
The Orphans

Unfortunately, even though the devastating bushfires have long since stopped burning, we'll continue to see the aftermath for years to come.  We're now in baby season for most species of birds and animals, and we're finding many cases of malnutrition due to scarcity of the foliage, flowers and seeds that form the basis of their diets.  Even insect eating animals such as echidnas are struggling, because there aren't enough ants and termites around to feed them.  Creatures that rely on tree hollows for their homes can't find adequate protection, as we've lost so many thousands of the old trees that provide this.  No matter how many new trees are planted, it will be many, many years before they mature to the stage where a cockatoo or possum can live in them.   We'll be putting up man-made possum boxes, support feeding wherever possible, and taking many more animals into care than in previous years.  

To add to this, there have been new diseases developing from the climatic conditions and fires.  We are heavily involved with authorities to find out what the causes are and how to treat them. Some of these diseases are wide spread up the east coast of Australia ( basically where the fires were) so it is very important that we work out what is happening quickly so we can save as many animals as possible.

We have also been catching insects for testing as it is thought that they are spreading one of the new diseases.

Our mobile care unit continues to see lots of wildlife in Sydney and we have been preparing it in case we have another terrible fire season in which we are call on to help our precious wildlife in the country areas.

Of course, Covid hasn't helped.  We've had to close the office for our rescue line, but have been able to continue to run the 24 hour service from members' homes.  Our training courses for new members have been put on hold due to the distancing regulations, so we're working hard to develop online training.  It won't be quite the same as a face-to-face course, but it will help us train the new members we desperately need.  

We have had to stop our company working bees at the rehabilitation facility and Kukundi, this means that we will have to now need to do extra hours or pay people to do this work which is an added pressure to our volunteers.

Even though there are now green shoots on burnt trees, and grass sprouting in the woodlands, things are a long way from "normal" for our wildlife and us.

Thank you for continuing to support us during these times as we adapt to the new challenges ahead to provide the best care for our wildlife. 

Collecting insects at the rehabilitation Facility
Collecting insects at the rehabilitation Facility
Kookaburra at the Mobile Care Unit, injured
Kookaburra at the Mobile Care Unit, injured
Kookaburra well now and released.
Kookaburra well now and released.
Our Mobile Care Units x rays
Our Mobile Care Units x rays
Possum with Attitude
Possum with Attitude
 
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