MAP International

Founded in 1954 as Medical Assistance Programs, MAP International is a global Christian health organization that partners with people living in conditions of poverty to save lives and develop healthier families and communities. Recognized for our 99% efficiency rating, we respond to the needs of those we serve by providing medicines, preventing disease, and promoting health to create real hope and lasting change. MAP currently operates from 2 US-based offices and 9 country offices. Country offices are located in Asia, Central America, South America, West Africa, and East Africa. Vision Statement MAP International is a global Christian health and relief organization that partners with peo...
Aug 17, 2016

Final Vitamin A Report

Vitamin A Deworming
Vitamin A Deworming

In remote regions of the world, a large percentage of children die before they reach their fifth birthday. Sadly, many die from conditions that are not only preventable, but also easily treated. MAP International aims to change that staggering statistic and offers simple, yet highly effective solutions that will save young lives.

By providing Vitamin A and deworming medicines, MAP improves the quality of life and save the lives of young children in Cote d’Ivoire and many other countries. Vitamin A deficiency makes infants vulnerable to diarrheal and other diseases, a leading cause of death in children under five in sub-Saharan Africa. Vitamin A deficiency also leads to anemia and blindness.

Worm infections cause and worsen malnutrition and anemia, both of which have significant negative impacts on children of preschool age who are in a period of intense physical and mental growth.

MAP and our partners can administer both of these life-saving treatments at the same time to dramatically reduce children’s susceptibility to disease. While children five and over often receive these interventions through school-based programs, children under five years old, who are most at risk of death from disease, often do not receive these critical treatments.


Attachments:
Aug 17, 2016

Final Bolivia Report

Bolivia’s children, due to environments and circumstances outside their control, commonly face extreme risk and vulnerability. Within Latin America and the Caribbean,Bolivia has the third highest rate of child mortality for children under age five (Caruso, Stephenson & Leon, 2010), and 30% of children under age three are chronically malnourished, which contributes to the major causes of child mortality along with respiratory infections and diarrhea (Ember & Ember, 2001). Rural and low-income urban neighborhoods in Bolivia also have very limited access to basic healthcare. Added to this, most communities in Bolivia have high rates of domestic violence and child abuse, and most children, especially infants, grow up in families and communities with chronic stress. This toxic stress in early childhood can damage the developing brain and the body’s stress response systems -- resulting in high financial and emotional costs for individuals, families and society and ultimately contributing to the intergenerational transmission of disadvantage, violence, poverty, and poor health. When multiplied across a community or an entire nation, the collective effect on human potential is devastating and contributes to continued cycles of underdevelopment.


Attachments:
Aug 17, 2016

Zika Update August 2016

Zika MAP
Zika MAP

Families in many South and Latin American countries are facing a heartbreaking dilemma: Avoid pregnancy altogether or risk a stillbirth or the birth of a baby with severe mental and physical disabilities.

With the Zika virus continuing to spread, the impact is personal for many. “We have already lost four babies in our congregation,” said Pastor Maria Cristina Gregorio, of the Tabernacle Church of Salvation and Praise in the Dominican Republic. “The virus is everywhere.”

The Aedes aegypti mosquito is spreading the Zika virus rapidly throughout Latin America and the Caribbean, and it’s estimated that there are over 1,500 cases in the United States as well. “This is the cockroach of mosquitos,” said Dr. Tom Frieden, Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Preventions (CDC). “It lives indoors and out, bites in the day and in the night. The eggs can last more than a year, and they can hatch in a drop of water.”

Though not life-threatening to healthy adults, unborn babies are at high risk for the Zika virus, which can cause severe birth defects if the baby survives pregnancy.

Symptoms are very similar to those of malaria, chikungunya, dengue, yellow fever and other diseases. This complicates matters, causing many people to think that they’ve been infected with the Zika virus. Access to testing is insufficient and costly, so many cases go unconfirmed or misdiagnosed.

Francesca, a young mother of two in the Dominican Republic is like many others living in Zika infected regions. “I think that my children had Zika last month,” said Francesca. “They had diarrhea, headaches, and fevers.”

MAP’s primary goal is to protect pregnant women from the Zika virus by providing mosquito repellents and to alleviate the effects of those infected by the virus through pain relievers and fever reducers.

Since February, MAP has provided over $119 million in relief to Zika infected regions and will continue to provide as much aid as possible to field partners.

“The speed of an epidemic is a speed of days and weeks,” said Frieden. “We have a narrow window of opportunity to scale up Zika prevention measures, and that window is closing.”

You can help protect and treat those living in Zika areas in South and Latin America. Learn more about MAP’s Zika response and how you can help, at www.map.org/zika.

Family with suspected Zika
Family with suspected Zika

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