Jan 17, 2014

A new home for Elvia and her four brothers

Dear Friends of Global Giving,

we are carrying on with our commitment to guarantee a respectable home to the poorest families of Cotopaxi region, in Ecuador, and the results we are achieving remind us how much we could still do for these people.

This time we are in the Parroquia Rural de Angamarca, 5 hours north from the capital Quito.

We left the asphalt a couple of hours ago already, now it's the turn of the pure carretera, dirt road in the mountains, a lot of bends and no safety.

Angamarca is a small pueblo in the Ecuadorean sierra andina, populated by approximately 800-1000 people. Nevertheless, its territory extends far beyond the village and includes caserios (small groups of houses) that you can only reach on foot, after long walks.

Chistilan is one of them: we leave in the early morning, at 8 o'clock, and we reached our destination at 12. Of course, the way could have lasted much less with well-trained legs and lungs used to this altitude... but we do with what we've got!

Elvia, a 14-years-old young girl with all the features of an experienced woman, lives in the páramo (a moor in the highest mountain ridge) with her mother and four brothers. Not a trace of a father figure, as frequent in the Ecuadorean society.

Although there is still a strong bond in these communities - even the smallest one democratically elects its delegates, representing the community before the neighbouring ones and the institutions -, this family lives isolated from the nearest community, Chistilan. To get there, we still have to walk for an hour and reach an altitude of around 4000 metres.

Elvia, her mum and her four little brothers have always lived in a choza, the typical home of these areas, made of mud walls and a thatched roof that has to be rebuilt every year, at the end of the rainy season.

But things will change soon for the family: a new home is waiting for them. It is built using adobes (typical bricks of the Andean areas, made of mud and straw, that keep the heat in the house surprisingly well), divided into two rooms (so that they can sleep in one of the spaces and light the fire and cook in the other one), and with a real roof, created with beams and laminates.

The new house is almost finished and this goal could not have been achieved without the precious help of the whole Chistilan community, that, according to the tradition, has solidarily participated in the construction, engaging in some days of collective work, called minga. When we went to see them, only the last wooden boards were missing: they had to be carried from Chistilan to the house by a tired donkey that will probably retire after this hard labour.

During the way back, with the calves aching because of the steep slope, we met at least four families asking for help, and their houses proved that they need it...

Elvia and her family thank you very much for your great support, but what about the others? How much you can still do?

Saludos desde Angamarca!

El paramo
El paramo
La choza + la nuova casa
La choza + la nuova casa
Vista di Chistilan dalla casa.
Vista di Chistilan dalla casa.
Aug 27, 2013

The story of Dona Victoria e Don Delfin's home

Andean landscape
Andean landscape

After a few months from the launch of our project on Global Giving platform, here are the first achieved results! And sorry once again for the delay!

Thanks to the first donations received, we are providing for the enlargement of Doña Victoria e Don Delfín's home; she is 78 and he is 83, at least it is what their old minds can remeber. They live with the outcome of a little land that surround their home and with their seven sheeps. They live in a pueblo of about 3000 people, included the inhabitans of the 14 surrounding rural communities. The nearest city is far three hours by car.

Victoria and Delfin's home has presently two rooms: one for sleeping and one used as a store for land products and work tools, but with our, and YOUR help, now they will be able to have a real kitchen with external ventilation, avoiding to cook in the same room where they go to sleep. The two elderly people already have the "adobes" ( the mud and straw briks typical of Andean homes), but only thanks to your donations it was possible for them to receive the free manpower and provide for the purchase of tiles. One italian guy, OMG volunteer, is engaged in the kitchen's building with the help of a little team: one "maestro", expert briklayer and two guys from Guanazàn. Instead, the tiles have been made by the artisans of the cooperative that is in the pueblo, who, once every two week, work as volunteers for poor people. We would also provide for the repair of the present roof, which is quite weak on the left side, by changing the tiles. Timbers needed for the roof building will be recycled from a little home never terminated, set just a little higher and belonging to the couple and their sons, who, like most of the guys in those areas, have migrated to the city. Victoria and Delfin never stopped to thanks for what they received, and to the question "what we could do more for you?" Señora Victoria answers: "you could gift an hearing aid to my houseband, "ese vejo no escucha nada!!!"

Don Delfin and Dona Victoria's home
Don Delfin and Dona Victoria's home
the home and its weak roof on the left side
the home and its weak roof on the left side
Don Delfin and Dona Victoria
Don Delfin and Dona Victoria
briks for the new kitchen
briks for the new kitchen
 
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