AfricAid, Inc.

AfricAid is a nonprofit organization that supports girls' education in Africa in order to provide young women with the opportunity to transform their own lives and the futures of their communities.
Jan 10, 2017

Stories and Dreams: Career Day 2016

Dorcus enjoyed hearing from successful women
Dorcus enjoyed hearing from successful women

Career Day was established in 2011 for two reasons:  it is important for Kisa Scholars to be inspired by other successful women from Tanzania and it is useful for the students to learn from people who are in the fields that they would like to pursue when going to university. It has been the norm since then, and several thousand girls have passed through six Kisa Career Day events.

 After five consecutive years of steadily increasing participation in this event and the expansion of AfricAid into the Kilimanjaro region, Career Day has grown to be so large that two separate events were held this fall.  Ms. Anande Nnko was hired as an event planner and she organized the two events with cooperation from the Kisa Mentors for Arusha and Kilimanjaro.

 The majority of attendees were Kisa Scholars, and the balance included AfricAid staff, Kisa Alumnae, guest speakers and other invited guests.  Nearly 1,200 people overall experienced this year’s gathering of inspiring role models and captivated students.

Arusha Region (including Partner Schools in Arusha and Monduli)

Date:  October 7, 2016

Location:  Olasiti Garden

Participants:  474 (382 Kisa Scholars)

Kilimanjaro Region

Date:  October 8, 2016

Location:  Mwenge Catholic University

Participants:  707 (630 Kisa Scholars)

 

There were three inspirational guest speakers who attended both events and shared their life stories with the girls.

  • Jackline Mkindi, Executive Director of Tanzania Horticulture Association (TAHA)
  • The Hon. Esther Bulaya, Member of Parliament
  • Anna Laroya, Pilot with Tanzania Wildlife Research Institute (TAWIRI)

 

There were also small group discussions where Kisa Scholars had the opportunity to meet with different professionals from different careers they wish to pursue, for example: economists, lawyers, doctors, engineers, pilots, accountants and many others. Kisa Scholars had time to ask a lot of questions for more clarification and understanding, but these break-out sessions are so popular that we plan to dedicate even more time to them in 2017.  Also, since Kisa Alumnae are becoming established in their careers, next time there should be at least one guest speaker who is an alumnae.

 

Career Day is here to stay!

Women from across Tanzania spoke at Career Day
Women from across Tanzania spoke at Career Day
Scholars asked questions and shared their stories
Scholars asked questions and shared their stories
Sarah and Augustina paused to pose for the camera
Sarah and Augustina paused to pose for the camera

Links:

Oct 12, 2016

592 New Kisa Scholars for 2016-2017 School Year

Kisa Mentor sharing about the Kisa Project
Kisa Mentor sharing about the Kisa Project

“Not everyone gets an opportunity to be in the Kisa Project and those who get that opportunity will find that it changes their lives completely”.  That was the message shared by the Year Two Scholars (Form Six) when they were introducing the program to the new Form Five students who were being recruited.

Since 2010, the Kisa Project has expanded from two schools to twenty in the Arusha and Kilimanjaro regions.  About 815 students in these partner schools have shown an interest in becoming Kisa Scholars this year.  However, due to limited resources, only 592 students will get to experience the two years of leadership, personal development and community service training.   At many schools, admission is more selective and the Mentors have to decide who can join.  If there are too many Scholars in a class, the mentoring process will not be as effective.

Kisa Mentors consider these criteria to select the new groups of Scholars:

  • Personal commitment toward the project
  • Level of confidence
  • Eagerness to learn new things
  • Vision for her community

The recruitment process starts with introducing the project to the new Scholars.  Those who are inspired enough then fill out the application forms.  This is followed by an interview, and lastly, the names of the selected Scholars are posted on the school notice board.

During the interview, the most important question we ask the potential Scholar is what she expects from the Kisa Project.  When answering, most of them spoke about the benefits shared by the Form Sixes during the introduction session. These include being confident, learning teamwork, fulfilling your personal goals, and achieving the vision you have for your community.

“I was inspired with the way the Kisa Scholars did the introduction for us. It seems Kisa enables girls to achieve their personal goals and be a part of the solution towards the challenges facing their societies.They spoke confidently and in a very strong and powerful voice. I can’t do that,” said one new recruit. Not yet, but before long, she will too!

A class of Kisa Scholars
A class of Kisa Scholars

Links:

Jul 19, 2016

Nelson Mandela Inspires Kisa Scholars to Lead

Kisa Scholars during their 2 Day Challenge
Kisa Scholars during their 2 Day Challenge

Kisa Scholars learn about leadership, in part, though stories of great leaders around the world. One of the leaders they learn about is the great Nelson Mandela. We use his leadership principles in our Kisa Curriculum, including:

 

  • Courage is not the absence of fear – it’s inspiring others to move beyond it.
  • Appearances matter – and remember to smile.
  • Lead from the back – and let others believe they are in front.

 

After two years of training, the students get a chance to start writing their own leadership stories by helping their communities solve different challenges. This program is called the 2 Day Challenge. On their own, scholars are required to research their communities’ challenges, come up with a project, organize the community members and do the project with them.

 

This year, the Kisa graduates did 37 different projects in communities throughout Tanzania. These projects included: fighting drug abuse, combatting Malaria, addressing issues of early marriage and early pregnancy, motivating other students to read different books, and tackling environmental issues, just to mention a few.

 

For these girls, it was their first time to do something like this. They had fear inside them, but that did not stop them from planning the projects, introducing themselves to the community leaders and stopping strangers on the street asking them to join the projects. They learned that Nelson Mandela was once scared on many occasions, but he overcame the fear. He believed that “courage is not the absence of fear, but overcoming the fear and in turn inspiring others to do the same.”

 

Like any other situation where you are doing something for the first time, the Kisa Scholars faced lots of challenges, but they persevered using the lessons learned in the Kisa Classes on Nelson Mandela. One group helped secondary school students prepare for their exams by educating them on self-awareness and time management.  Their approach was to let the students first come up with possible solutions to this challenge. At the end, the Kisa Scholars concluded by giving them their suggestions. They applied the Mandela principle of “leading from the back” to show the students that they have solutions for their problems inside themselves; they only need to think deeper and work together.

 

Nelson Mandela has been an inspirational leader to many people, including our young Kisa Scholars.  They use his principles to bring changes in their communities – and to become outstanding women.

Destroying weeds to keep mosquitoes away.
Destroying weeds to keep mosquitoes away.
Scholars work in groups to complete a project.
Scholars work in groups to complete a project.

Links:

 
   

donate now:

An anonymous donor will match all new monthly recurring donations, but only if 75% of donors upgrade to a recurring donation today.
Terms and conditions apply.
Make a monthly recurring donation on your credit card. You can cancel at any time.
Make a donation in honor or memory of:
What kind of card would you like to send?
How much would you like to donate?
  • $25
    (USD)
    give
  • $50
    (USD)
    give
  • $100
    (USD)
    give
  • $200
    (USD)
    give
  • $250
    (USD)
    give
  • $500
    (USD)
    give
  • $1,000
    (USD)
    give
  • $5,000
    (USD)
    give
  • $25
    each month

    (USD)
    give
  • $50
    each month

    (USD)
    give
  • $100
    each month

    (USD)
    give
  • $200
    each month

    (USD)
    give
  • $250
    each month

    (USD)
    give
  • $500
    each month

    (USD)
    give
  • $1,000
    each month

    (USD)
    give
  • $5,000
    each month

    (USD)
    give
  • $
    give
gift Make this donation a gift, in honor of, or in memory of someone?

Reviews of AfricAid, Inc.

Great Nonprofits
Read and write reviews about AfricAid, Inc. on GreatNonProfits.org.
WARNING: Javascript is currently disabled or is not available in your browser. GlobalGiving makes extensive use of Javascript and will not function properly with Javascript disabled. Please enable Javascript and refresh this page.