Conservation through Poverty Alleviation, Int

Conservation through Poverty Alleviation, International, a US-based 501(c)3 organization, helps subsistence farmers displaced by the formation of national parks establish new livelihoods that restore and sustain protected habitats.
Mar 20, 2017

CPALI Responds: Cyclone Enawo

Paddling near the Maroa market after flood
Paddling near the Maroa market after flood

Donors and supporters,

We are humbled by the outpouring of love and support for Madagascar during this critical time. Thank you for your kindness and generosity!  There is much to do. 

The first situation reports were released this week by the Bureau National de Gestion des Risques et des Catastrophes (BNGRC) (the Malagasy National Bureau for Risk and Disaster Management). Their reports highlight severe damage to the Sava region, where Cyclone Enawo made a direct hit and caused extensive wind and water damage to homes and infrastructure. Aerial surveys indicate that the most severe flooding took place in the Maroantsetra district, where 80% of the rice fields were flooded and 40% of the people displaced. Statistics on displaced people continue to rise as rural communities are contacted one by one. Cyclone Enawo traveled the entire length of the island and exited to the south, affecting communities across Madagascar. 

The response is already under way. The BNGRC as well as CARE, FAO, OCHA, Madagascar Red Cross, MEDAIR, UNFPA, UNICEF, WFP and WHO are working together to get aid into the areas that need it most, with some organizations having greater capacity in certain areas than others. CPALI will work with these groups to try to increase the scope and capacity of the response in Maroantsetra and surrounding areas in order to meet the need. We targeted three main areas that we want to support: 

1) First and foremost, potable water - Medair is already very responsive in that area, especially in Maraontsetra so we will assist them with their effort in every way we can. They are providing WASH kits for immediate use, cleaning wells and installing hand-pumps to prevent future contamination events. To meet the immediate need, CPALI will contribute our first $3000 towards 150 wash kits ($20 each) and any logistical support we can offer. 

2) Food security - with rice fields badly flooded, especially in Maroantsetra, food security is already a growing concern.  The BNGRC reported that although they have already distributed 250 tons of rice and 125 tons of vegetables across the country, the need remains enormous.  The country President visited Maroantsetra during the first few days after the cyclone and distributed 10 cups of rice to each family to meet immediate need, but 10 cups of rice only feeds a family for a day or two at most. SEPALI director Mamy Ratsimbazafy reported that the markets are nearly empty and food is an immediate and growing concern. CPALI is looking to the WFP and partners to assist with emergency food shipments and restocking seed stores. CPALI will contribute the next round of funds to food security in Maroantsetra and replacing seed stocks. 

3) Health and education materials for children with UNICEF - Flooding destroyed many paper products including notebooks and materials that children used for school, which many families cannot afford to replace. SEPALI will work with WCS and UNICEF to try to get kids back into school as quickly as possible. 

In addition, CPALI will sell off all remaining silk stock in the US and donate 50% to disaster relief funds. The other 50% will go towards training programs for artisans and providing livelihoods to get people back on their feet.  

We are extremely grateful to all of you who have already given so much. Please pass this project along to friends and family as the need is still great across Madagascar and we have the rare ability to make an immediate and live-saving difference in the lives of so many!

All the best to you and yours and to Madagascar, 

CPALI Team

Maroantsetra starts to drain after cyclone
Maroantsetra starts to drain after cyclone
Cleanup begins
Cleanup begins
Aerial view of Maroantsetra flooding (Medair)
Aerial view of Maroantsetra flooding (Medair)
Ambinanitelo houses emerge after 4 days (WCS)
Ambinanitelo houses emerge after 4 days (WCS)
Feb 27, 2017

Misaotra Betsaka!

Lalaina with her first woven banner
Lalaina with her first woven banner

Misaotra Betsaka ("Thank you very much")! 

We are happy to announce that we completed our fundraising goal for the first phase of our artisan training program! Hooray!

What does that mean?

Well, "phase one" of the Artisan Training initiative was dependent on a two-year fundraiser which was successfully completed this past month, but as you can tell from our reports, we didn't wait to get started. Investments in the project occurred as soon as they came in and we have already made significant progress towards our goals. 

Thanks to your generous contributions, we were able to build infrastructure including a new silk drying house, dyeing houses and a bunk house, we invested in equipment, trained our staff in new production techniques, hosted international consultants, and most importantly, provided year-round training, facilities and support for Malagasy women to become artisans and earn a living. Those same artisans now support their families, send their children to school and invest in their futures.

From a meager start three years ago of just 10-20 meters of sample textile, we now have a production capacity of over 500 refined products per year, close to 20k in silk revenue and a year-round dedicated artisan community investing in sustainable livelihoods. 

We are grateful for your support and encouragement and we can't wait to take the project to the next level. 

What happens next?

Phase two!

Phase two takes the Artisan Training project from a Maroantsetra-centered initiative out into the rural communities to provide sustainable income-generating opportunities for women where few opportunities currently exist. Phase two will focus on raffia, a native palm fiber that can be woven into textile without electricity. This will expand and diversify our silk project and products while continuing to support endemic forests and resources. Keep your eyes peeled for Raffia and Looms, coming soon.

Thanks again!

All the best,

CPALI/SEPALI Team

SEPALI team showcases 50 meters of raffia textile
SEPALI team showcases 50 meters of raffia textile
First handbag design workshop in the capital
First handbag design workshop in the capital
Handbags made by a design team in the capital
Handbags made by a design team in the capital
Feb 7, 2017

Have you ever tasted cricketskiver???

Tea party with cricketskiver!
Tea party with cricketskiver!

In our last report we introduced  you to mofo-gassy (Malagasy bread), a delicious flour-pancake. The pancakes are similar to the Danish treat,  aebleskiver made with apples. We now challenge you to try our new mofo – cricketskiver made by CPALI Walla Walla volunteer, Walla Walla volunteers Theo and Eric Gryler, in our home kitchen. Delicious cannot describe the concoctions - cricketskiver with cherry jam, cricketskiver with pear preserve, cricketskiver with honey, and the “traditional cricketskiver”with apple.  Our next mission will be savory cricketskiver with hot sauce!

Great Grandma’s Danish Aebleskiver is made with 2 cups of flour – cricketskiver (or maybe grylskiver in honor of the field cricket, Gryllus, and Eric Gryler) is made with 1.5 cups of flour and 0.5 cup of cricket flour (or ground-up crickets). The flour has a delicious nutty flavor and adds extra protein to a favorite Malagasy breakfast food. I can hardly wait for our next visit to SEPALI Madagascar where we will introduce cricketskiver – served with cinnamon bark tea!

 Our insects for food farming group continues to plan for a Madagascar meeting in April. Our goal is to have identified a suitable species for farming in addition to gathering together all individuals interested in introducing insect farming for nutrition and profit. Our model so far is to organize a central insect factory for processing and farming as well as introduce home farming of insects to interested families living in villages. Since most subsistence farmers are not eager to take on any project other than rice production for food, or projects that don’t yield money, we hope to design a system where farmers will be able to sell their crop to the processing center for grinding, packaging and distributing. Since insects have both high protein and iron content, and both are accessible to the human gut, we hope that we will be able to help improve childhood nutrition.

Be the first on your block to make cricketskiver!  We will let you know how the SEPALI Madagascar team likes criskiver as soon as they return from vacation!

New uses for insect flour
New uses for insect flour
Traditional malagasyskiver
Traditional malagasyskiver
 
   

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