Conservation Volunteers Australia

Conservation Volunteers has partnered with individuals, businesses and governments in the conservation of our unique environment since 1982. In that time we have welcomed hundreds of thousands of volunteers from around Australia and across the world and supported their participation in a diversity of important projects to protect and enhance our environment. Our Vision We believe in a healthy and sustainable environment, and for everyone to be involved in managing and protecting that environment. Our Mission To attract and manage volunteers to participate in projects that protect or enhance our environment and heritage. Our Objectives 1. A healthy, diverse and sustainably managed envir...
Sep 1, 2016

Wandering Wombats, Warrens and WEEDS!

Wandering wet Wombat in search of food
Wandering wet Wombat in search of food

Dear Friends in Wombat Conservation,

It has been a very healing winter in South Australia, with above average rainfall being experienced across the state. The result has seen landscapes that we have become used to seeing dry and dusty,  being transformed with new green growth. This has been particularly exciting at Brookfield Conservation Park with native grasslands becoming re-established in areas that had been the focus of intense maintenance and weed removal efforts by teams of volunteers over the last couple of years.

However, the rain has also obviously been beneficial for the growth of the invasive weeds that were still present on the property. Invasive species are incredibly detrimental because they are able to out-compete native species and can result in native animals becoming very ill, and potentially starving, as they are unable to obtain the nutrients that they require from these foreign plants. With the memory of the dramatic decline in the health of the local wombat populations last year, which was attributed to the reduction in the number of native grasslands, still very fresh in our minds, it was imperative to get as many volunteer teams as possible to Brookfield to undertake another large weed removal effort, before these plants had the chance to seed and continue their relentless invasion of the Conservation Park.

Thank you to the amazing support that had been provided by our Global Giving donors we were able to send seven teams to Brookfield over the winter months, equating to over 200 hours of weed removal being undertaken!

While the teams were on location they also focused on trail maintenance to improve the human-nature interactions are Brookfield. The existence of visible and accessible walking trails are essential to encourage the general public to visit the Conservation Park, and even more importantly, persuade them to remain on the walking tracks and to not ‘go bush’ where, even their footprints, have the potential to disrupt the incredibly sensitive habitat that is present in the Park. One team of volunteers also had to re-direct a couple of sections of the trail as two wombats were unknowingly extending their warrens closer and closer to the path. If the warren was allowed to be dug under the trail, both the wombats and members of the public could be at risk if the ground caved-in.

These activities highlight the importance of a continued volunteer presence to assist with the management of this important habitat for the long-term conservation of all the native animals at Brookfield – including the Parks star, everyone’s favourite, the Southern Hairy-nosed Wombat.

We could not have undertaken this timely assault on the introduced species without the support of our Global Giving donors, and while our efforts have assisted in creating a more secure future for the wombats, our ongoing exclosure trials and research is essential to remain ahead of future threats that face these wombat populations – particularly as a result of climate change.

We and our wombats thank you for your continued support!

Trail Blazers. Volunteers maintaining trails.
Trail Blazers. Volunteers maintaining trails.
Weeds anyone?  Removing whorehound weeds!
Weeds anyone? Removing whorehound weeds!
Wombat Warren surveying
Wombat Warren surveying

Links:

Aug 31, 2016

Road to Recovery through Virtual Fencing

Making an Enclosed Success
Making an Enclosed Success

 

Dear Friends in Tassie Devil Conservation,

The Tasmanian Devil is a unique species, it is currently the world's largest surviving carnivorous marsupial. Their piercing screams can be heard at night but they are rarely spotted, largely because they are nocturnal and somewhat elusive. This amazing species has been subjected to the Devil Facial Tumour Disease (DFTD) which has seen a dramatic drop in wild devil populations. Since the disease was discovered and identified in 1996 some areas around Tasmania have seen a 95% decrease in devil numbers. They are a scavenger by nature which sees them often exposed to traffic due to the attraction to road kill. This added threat for the devil has seen a number of fatalities in the healthy populations.

Attempts are being made to discourage devils from the road including installing virtual fencing. The fence sends a high pitched noise out to deter them when they cross the sensors. These have been installed on the Tasman Peninsula as a trial, in locations where there have been high numbers of devil road kills. This project is hoped to lower the number of road kill as well as becoming a method that can be implemented state wide. Community awareness campaigns around driving to the conditions and removing road kill from the road are also being promoted as methods of avoidance.

The other programs that have assisted with increasing healthy devil numbers have included captive breeding, isolation of healthy devils and relocation programs. Conservation Volunteers Australia (CVA) has been a part of a number of these programs thanks to the generosity and support from Global Giving donations. CVA have not only participated in the relocation and soft release programs, we were also able to build a large devil enclosure for aging healthy devils. This was a great way of allowing these healthy breeding populations to retire and relax into their old age.

By gaining future support through donations, CVA will be able to participate in virtual fencing programs across the state as well as relocation and soft release programs. This will see wide spread disease free devil populations return to Tasmania, while helping protect this unique national icon.   

Happy Devils retire in Style!
Happy Devils retire in Style!
Did someone say Relocate?
Did someone say Relocate?
Virtual Fence Example - Photo D McIntyre ABC News
Virtual Fence Example - Photo D McIntyre ABC News

Links:

Aug 31, 2016

Cockatoos Watch Their Future GROW!

Happy Volunteers Planting for the Cockatoos
Happy Volunteers Planting for the Cockatoos

Welcome Friends of Cockatoo Conservation,

The last three months have been busy for our volunteer teams.  With winter in full swing, we have been planting thousands of tree seedlings and preparing planting sites to help other community groups with their tree planting efforts for the cockatoos.

 

In July our volunteers had some important visitors to one of our project sites to supervise our planting efforts.  A large flock of Red-tailed Black Cockatoos sat in the trees, and watched on as we planted native seedlings which will grow into food and roosting sources for this vulnerable species.  Red tails are notoriously cheeky and playful birds, and our volunteers watched as they crash-landed into each other on the tree branches and mucked about in the sky. 

 

Conservation volunteer, Nanae Arato, travelled from Japan to take part on our program, and was excited to see the red tails.  She said, “It’s amazing to see the birds that we are planting these seedlings for, they are beautiful!”  The rest of the team also enjoyed the red tails’ visit as it really hit home, how all their efforts will directly help the local wildlife.

 

From July to the end of August, our volunteers spent time at a number of key sites for the black cockatoos around Perth.   These included bushland sites in Nedlands and Inglewood.  These inner suburban sites form important green corridors, that provide protection for the black cockatoos as they search for food and roosting sites.  Revegetating and maintaining these corridors forms an important part of the rehabilitation plan for these birds.

 

We would like to thank our supporters and volunteers.  Without your support, Conservation Volunteers Australia wouldn’t be able to make a difference to this important cause.  If you are able to donate again, we would really appreciate it – every donation will help us to continue achieving these great conservation results and give these beautiful birds a better chance at coming back from the brink of extinction.  For the rest of the year, our volunteers will be focusing on the essential maintenance of the thousands of seedlings that we planted over winter to give the best possible chance for these new cockatoo habitats to grow and thrive.  

So... What
So... What's happening here?
Planting in a prepared site
Planting in a prepared site
Yummy! We can
Yummy! We can't wait for the new trees to grow!
Majestic!
Majestic!

Links:

 
   

donate now:

An anonymous donor will match all new monthly recurring donations, but only if 75% of donors upgrade to a recurring donation today.
Terms and conditions apply.
Make a monthly recurring donation on your credit card. You can cancel at any time.
Make a donation in honor or memory of:
What kind of card would you like to send?
How much would you like to donate?
  • $20
    give
  • $50
    give
  • $100
    give
  • $20
    each month
    give
  • $50
    each month
    give
  • $100
    each month
    give
  • $
    give
gift Make this donation a gift, in honor of, or in memory of someone?
WARNING: Javascript is currently disabled or is not available in your browser. GlobalGiving makes extensive use of Javascript and will not function properly with Javascript disabled. Please enable Javascript and refresh this page.