Conservation Volunteers Australia

Conservation Volunteers has partnered with individuals, businesses and governments in the conservation of our unique environment since 1982. In that time we have welcomed hundreds of thousands of volunteers from around Australia and across the world and supported their participation in a diversity of important projects to protect and enhance our environment. Our Vision We believe in a healthy and sustainable environment, and for everyone to be involved in managing and protecting that environment. Our Mission To attract and manage volunteers to participate in projects that protect or enhance our environment and heritage. Our Objectives 1. A healthy, diverse and sustainably managed envir...
Nov 29, 2016

Spring Monitoring Records Broken!

Eastern Barred Bandi-cute!
Eastern Barred Bandi-cute!

Spring has seen our second monitoring round completed at both Woodlands Historic Park and Hamilton Community Parklands, with some outstanding results.

We completed seven days of trapping (and releasing!) on both sites, with a total of 1,280 traps checked, 2,000 bait balls made to attract the bandicoots and 110 kilometres walked very early in the morning in search of our furry friends.  It’s been a huge undertaking but the results have made it more than worthwhile – records were broken everywhere! 

Firstly to our Woodlands results.  Thankfully with the warmer weather our grass habitat has started to return after the wet winter.  This has proved vital for the bandicoot’s breeding conditions, which showed in the overall numbers.  Project Officer, Travis, reports Our previous record was 114 individuals caught, and amazingly we surpassed that with 132 individuals found!  We also found that 65 of those individuals were new born and bred on site, and had never been caught before.  This shows a great new breeding cycle has taken place, and a new influx of juvenile animals are on the ground to take the breeding and population growth even further over the next few years.  Out of all the females caught 94% showed signs of breeding, including 93 pouch young. It looks like there will be plenty of summer babies this year.  We hope they all do well and look forward to monitoring them next autumn. Check out this short video of a volunteer releasing a bandicoot after its health check.

Hamilton has also produced fantastic results. Earlier this year 20 bandicoots were released on site to start off the program.  Monitoring such low numbers can be like finding a needle in a haystack, however, we managed to capture 15 individuals from the original release. Travis says “This is wonderful news as it shows that Hamilton is in perfect condition for both habitat and food sources for the bandicoots.  All the animals processed were in good health and they are being found all over the site.  We are also now very proud parents in Hamilton with five new bandicoot babies born and bred on site. As per Woodlands, all the females we caught had pouch young so the population is well on the way to expanding and boosting the overall total of bandicoots in Victoria.

With these excellent results, it really has been a great end to the monitoring year.  There have been many challenges throughout the year, but with the generous support from donors and the invaluable assistance from volunteers, these resilient, wonderful, creatures can be brought back from the brink of extinction!

Once again thank you to everyone involved from, our dedicated volunteers, our very generous GlobalGiving donors, Parks Victoria and all members of the Eastern Barred Bandicoot Recovery Team who have assisted with making this possible. We look forward to keeping you up-to-date on our bandicoot friends in 2017!

Weight checks - nice and healthy!
Weight checks - nice and healthy!
Health checks finished - time to go home
Health checks finished - time to go home

Links:

Nov 29, 2016

Saving our Wombats - Toxic Weed Strategy Success!

Southern Hairy-nosed Wombat
Southern Hairy-nosed Wombat

Mother Nature has been very kind this past 3 months with plenty of rain falling on the Murray Mallee and in particular Brookfield Conservation Park. This has encouraged the growth of the much favoured native grasses for the Southern Hairy-nosed Wombat – the Park is looking pretty good!

Funds generously donated recently enabled volunteers to undertake maintenance on the grassland exclosures and collect data on the browsing pressure on existing vegetation. We are discovering from this site and older exclosures that this is a long term program – it appears that we need to wait a minimum of two years for any of the seeds to germinate and then the vegetation needs to be monitored. One of the many benefits of undertaking projects like these at Brookfield is our long term presence here and the commitment of long term volunteers.

A major coup is the successful collaborative grant – Ecology and Management of the Southern Hairy-nosed Wombat. Alongside the University of Adelaide, Flinders University and the state government and others, Conservation Volunteers Australia (CVA) will be part of this project that will develop a comprehensive understanding of the interactions between Southern Hairy-nosed wombats and environmental conditions, and evaluate innovative spatial technologies for long-term species conservation in the light of changing climate and socio-economic pressures. Our volunteers will play a significant role in assisting researchers with the collection of this priority data. Regional Manager, Tricia, reports “We recently hosted students from Waldorf Willunga High who surveyed the active wombat warrens, set up remote sensor cameras and trialled using a drone over the park to collect footage – a very exciting time for us all!

So far with your support, we have been able to implement our weed strategy program, preventing further outbreaks of toxic weeds that were affecting the nutritional balance of the Southern Hairy-nosed Wombat. Ingestion of these toxic weeds was affecting the wombat’s kidneys and liver, leading to emaciation and death. We’re pleased to report we have had no new outbreaks. This is a time to celebrate but also a time to ensure our implementation plan is adhered to – our next step is to schedule regular events to keep on top of the weeds and ensure no new outbreaks occur. It also means that we are able to look beyond this health issue and implement other positive programs, ensuring the Southern Hairy-nosed Wombat population at Brookfield stays healthy, despite its fragmentation from other populations. We are also trialling new ways to prevent over grazing of native vegetation and supporting wombat research.

As the year comes to a close, we thank you again for your ongoing support and generosity. We hope you have a happy and safe holiday season, and look forward to keeping you up-to-date on our wombats in 2017.

Our amazing volunteers!
Our amazing volunteers!
PhD student Alice setting up camera traps
PhD student Alice setting up camera traps
Time for a scratch!
Time for a scratch!

Links:

Nov 28, 2016

Restoring the Black Cockatoos Habitat

Red-tailed Black Cockatoo
Red-tailed Black Cockatoo

The last couple of months have seen our volunteer teams finish up with a lot of our planting projects, and start on our green stock and track maintenance activities.  Volunteers have also had the opportunity to visit a couple of primary schools where they have assisted teachers by building outdoor and living classrooms.  Teachers will now be able to use these outdoor natural spaces to educate students about sustainability, Reduce Reuse Recycle, ecosystems and life cycles.

One of these projects was at Orange Grove Primary School where the students built nesting boxes for the Black Cockatoos earlier this year.  Every time the team visits the school, they monitor all five of the nesting boxes for signs of use.  So far the smaller parrot boxes have visible scratching marks and staff from the school have seen the Black Cockatoos checking out the larger nesting boxes.  Volunteers have also helped with sustainability projects at the school, helping to build veggie gardens and compost heaps.  The Principal, Ms Cole was extremely happy with the activities completed by the volunteers, “Thank you so much for your help, the students are now researching what veggies they will plant and when”.     

Our volunteers were once again lucky to be visited by flocks of Black Cockatoos this quarter.  Teams helping with invasive weed removal on Ferndale were witness to a small flock of Red Tailed Black Cockatoos, feeding and playing in the nearby trees. Long-time regular volunteer, Mr Nylander, caught some great shots of the flock and Regional Coordinator Ms Haynes said “It’s great for the volunteers to see the beautiful birds in the wild.  Their huge effort to restore the Black Cockatoos habitat is immediately rewarded with the large birds’ playful behaviour in the sky”.

For the rest of the year, our volunteers will be focusing on the maintenance of the thousands of seedlings that we planted over winter. It’s a big task, but an important one to secure the future of this vulnerable species.

Conservation Volunteers Australia (CVA) would like to thank our supporters, volunteers and donors.  Without your support, CVA wouldn’t be able to make a difference to this important cause.  If you are able to donate again we would really appreciate it – every donation will help us to continue achieving these great conservation results and give these beautiful birds a better chance at coming back from the brink of extinction.

Volunteers Planting Future Nesting Sites
Volunteers Planting Future Nesting Sites
Future Food for the Cockatoos
Future Food for the Cockatoos
Delicious!
Delicious!

Links:

 
   

donate now:

An anonymous donor will match all new monthly recurring donations, but only if 75% of donors upgrade to a recurring donation today.
Terms and conditions apply.
Make a monthly recurring donation on your credit card. You can cancel at any time.
Make a donation in honor or memory of:
What kind of card would you like to send?
How much would you like to donate?
  • $10
    give
  • $25
    give
  • $50
    give
  • $75
    give
  • $100
    give
  • $500
    give
  • $1,000
    give
  • $10
    each month
    give
  • $25
    each month
    give
  • $50
    each month
    give
  • $75
    each month
    give
  • $100
    each month
    give
  • $500
    each month
    give
  • $1,000
    each month
    give
  • $
    give
gift Make this donation a gift, in honor of, or in memory of someone?
WARNING: Javascript is currently disabled or is not available in your browser. GlobalGiving makes extensive use of Javascript and will not function properly with Javascript disabled. Please enable Javascript and refresh this page.