Oregon Food Bank, Inc.

To eliminate hunger and its root causes because no one should be hungry.
Dec 12, 2016

Former Combat Veteran to Master Gardener, Seed to Supper Teacher says Gardening Saved His Life

Dewey in the Marines
Dewey in the Marines

“It all started with a packet of flower seeds,” says Dewey Morris. “They were four o’clocks and I was fascinated by how they opened up in the afternoon sun.” Dewey, a former Marine, struggled after returning from Iraq. He felt lost, depressed and couldn’t get his feet under him.

Looking for somewhere to put his focus, Dewey began gardening. “The more I put my hands in the soil, the happier I felt,” says Dewey. The garden has helped heal some of the combat wounds that can’t be seen. “My soul felt like a jigsaw puzzle thrown all over the place. And as I’m getting into gardening, it feels like that puzzle’s being put back together.”

As a Seed to Supper volunteer in Klamath County, Dewey hopes to inspire the people around him. “It really makes them happy when they put a seed in the ground and take care of it… that’s the most rewarding part.” Dewey also works with several community gardens and hopes to one day create a healing garden for veterans.

You can listen to Dewey’s story by visiting oregonfoodbank.org/poweroffood.

Dewey teaches life-changing skills of gardening
Dewey teaches life-changing skills of gardening

Links:

Dec 12, 2016

Improving Health with Fresh Produce

Health providers help patients w/ food insecurity
Health providers help patients w/ food insecurity

You make it possible for families to change their diet, habits with fruits and vegetables

About a dozen people are lined up outside OHSU’s Richmond Clinic in Southeast Portland. Nearby, OHSU and Oregon Food Bank employees along with volunteers fill tables with fresh vegetables and fruits. At 4 p.m. the first person in line eagerly steps forward to choose from a bounty of lettuce, zucchini, apples and much more.

This summer, Oregon Food Bank partnered with OHSU Richmond Clinic for the Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) Partnerships for Health. The program offered 18 weeks of subsidized boxes of locally grown produce. Everyone involved in the program had screened positive for food insecurity. The fruits and vegetables they received were grown on Oregon Food Bank’s community farm with the help of volunteers and Grow Portland.

“We’re building on the work of a pilot program at Multnomah County’s Mid-County Medical Center,” says Dr. Brian Frank of OHSU Family Medicine at Richmond. “We hope to show that simple interventions can change eating habits.” Partners in the project are conducting an in-depth evaluation to discover if there is a medical benefit to prescribe healthy foods to patients in need.

In addition to the CSA, patients received access to cooking classes and food education. Your support of Oregon Food Bank allows us to be part of these community solutions to hunger. 

Links:

Sep 15, 2016

Rallying a Community to Improve Food Security

Group of FEAST attendees making big plans.
Group of FEAST attendees making big plans.

With your help, more people will have access to better food

When the closest grocery store is nearly 25 miles away, you sometimes do without fresh produce. That's the challenge facing residents of Chiloquin, a small town nestled in southern Oregon's Klamath Basin. But change is on the horizon.

Perri of Klamath Tribal Health and Family Services learned about Oregon Food Bank's FEAST (Food, Education, Agriculture, Solutions Together) program when she attended the event in Grand Ronde two years ago. Impressed with Grand Ronde's success and renewed collaboration, Perri started the process to bring FEAST to Chiloquin. 

Months of planning finally paid off last April when 20 community leaders attended the Chiloquin FEAST event. Much of the discussion was centered on the town's best asset: a community garden. The 1.5 acre garden is available to tribal and non-tribal members. "I want everyone to get involved and take ownership of this. instead of a food desert, we could have a food oasis," says Perri. 

Your support of Oregon Food Bank allows the FEAST model to be shared in community around the state - creating stable food systems and thriving communities. 

Links:

 
   

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