United Nations Foundation

The UN Foundation was created in 1998 with businessman and philanthropist Ted Turner's historic $1 billion gift to support United Nations' causes. The UN Foundation promotes a more peaceful, prosperous, and just world through the support of the United Nations. Through new and innovative public-private partnerships, advocacy and grantmaking, the UN Foundation acts to meet the most pressing health, humanitarian, socioeconomic, and environmental challenges of the 21st century.
Oct 23, 2014

A Promise Renewed

Yesterday, UNICEF announced that the world is steadily moving forward on improving child survival. Their latest progress report confirms that the estimated annual number of under-five deaths has decreased by almost half since 1990, from 12.7 million to from 6.3 million. What's even better? This rate is falling fast and almost 100 million children have been saved in the past two decades.

Despite these encouraging successes, I was struck that this progress is not enough to meet Millennium Development Goal (MDG) 4—reducing childhood mortality by two-thirds. Measles, a disease that can be prevented by a vaccine, still kills an estimated 122,000 children per year. Dr. Richard Horton, Editor-in-Chief of The Lancet put it best when he said, "it is unacceptable, at this stage, to see complacency." More work needs to be done so no child dies of a preventable cause by their fifth birthday.

Shot@Life is committed to reducing childhood mortality by bringing access to vaccines to children around the globe. We need your support to renew our promise to all children. How can you step up the progress?

  • Visit Walgreens and get your flu shot. Walgreens will donate one life-saving vaccine to a child in need for every flu shot administered at a participating location
  • Share this graphic on Facebook to let your friends know about the progress we've made.

  • Donate $20 and give child a shot at a healthy tomorrow by immunizing him against measles, polio, pneumonia and rotavirus.

Together, we can further reduce these unnecessary deaths and give more children a shot at a happy life.

Links:

Jul 21, 2014

5 Reasons to Join Shot@Life to Stop the Spots

    1. Measles is one of the most contagious and deadliest killers of children under the age of five.
    2. Severe measles is more likely among poorly nourished young children, especially those with insufficient vitamin A, or whose immune systems have been weakened by HIV/AIDS or other diseases.
    3. Immunization campaigns have a real impact.  Since the year 2000, more than one billion children in high risk countries have been vaccinated against the disease.
    4. The United Nations Foundation is a proud member of the Measles & Rubella Initiative (MRI) which is focused on reducing global measles mortality by 95% by year 2015. All donations made to the Shot@Life Stop the Spots campaign will directly support MRI’s work in developing countries.  
    5. It only costs $1 to provide a measles vaccine to a child. 

Links:

Mar 31, 2014

Polio-like illness in California

Devi Thomas and her son
Devi Thomas and her son

I'm sure you have been following the medical cases in California where state health officials are tracking as many as 25 children who are displaying "polio-like" symptoms. Although these children do not suffer from polio, their deteriorating condition brings to the forefront the devastation that polio can cause for pockets of our world's children.

Polio is a highly infectious virus spread by person to person contact. In environments with poor levels of hygiene and water, the virus has an easy vehicle to infect people. Most people infected with the virus have no signs of illness and are never aware they have been infected. These symptomless individuals carry the virus in their body and can silently spread it to thousands of others before the first case of polio paralysis emerges.

At its peak in the 1950s, polio paralyzed up to 20,000 people a year in the U.S., mostly children. Widespread immunization efforts wiped out the disease in the U.S. Fast forward 50+ years and polio still remains endemic in three countries: Pakistan, Afghanistan and Nigeria.

I have received emails from Shot@Life supporters following the national news coverage of these unfortunate cases in California. You all want to know: What does this mean for polio globally? First, it is important to remember that these cases are not polio cases, but they do serve as an unfortunate reminder that it wasn't too long ago that polio was still affecting children in the U.S. and we must continue to educate Americans about the need for polio vaccinations worldwide.

We are so close to eradicating this disease Use this national awareness to educate your local community on the importance of supporting global polio vaccinations. Contact your local opinion editors and let them know you have a perspective on this issue. I look forward to a time when everyone in the world can think of polio as a "thing of the past".

Links:

 
   

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