Cheetah Conservation Fund

To be the internationally recognized centre of excellence in the conservation of cheetahs and their ecosystems. CCF will work with all stakeholders to develop best practices in research, education, and land use to benefit all species, including people. CCF works to: create and manage long-term conservation strategies for the cheetah; develop and implement livestock management practices that eliminate the need for ranchers to kill cheetah; conduct education programs for locals; continue research in genetics, biology, species survival
Mar 6, 2015

Update On Our Newest Additions and Health Checkups

B2 is Now One Year Old!
B2 is Now One Year Old!

Our youngest cheetah, B2 is now one year old and has been bonded succesfully with Phoenix. The two are doing great together and B2 is settling into his new home with his new coalition mate nicely! CCF was pleased to host some of the management of B2Gold and their guests during a visit to the CCF main campus yesterday. B2Gold operate the nearby Otjikoto gold mine, which came into production late last year and is an important addition to the Namibian economy. B2Gold has been a wonderful donor to CCF and our ecology staff assist in biodiversity research on the mine’s set-aside ecological reserve. The most recent addition to our resident cheetahs, B2, is named after B2Gold.

CCF has a new resident cheetah – Romeo. He was a farmer’s longtime family pet. Recently the farmer and his wife had to leave their home for assisted living and released Romeo into CCF’s care. Although he was very well cared for and is a very sweet cheetah, the practice of taking cheetah cubs as pets is generally not allowed. We are thankful that he was so well cared for and that the farmer entrusted CCF with Romeo’s future care. He will be integrated into CCF’s other orphans and hopefully create some lifelong bonds with members of his own species. Romeo recently underwent a full health check, under anesthesia. We took some genetic samples to be stored and he recovered perfectly. We will keep you posted on his progress and socialization with the other cheetahs here at CCF.

Dr. Léart Petrick, a Windhoek eye specialist with a practise focused on serving humans, recently travelled to Cheetah Conservation Fund (CCF) to perform an operation on a different kind of patient. Khayjay, a four-and-a-half-year-old cheetah that has lived at CCF since he was three weeks of age, successfully underwent a 45-minute surgery to address a chronic, debilitating eye problem.

“Khayjay’s left eye was creating excessive amounts of discharge, causing him discomfort and interfering with his vision”, said CCF veterinarian Dr. Mari-Ann DaSilva. “When Khayjay was not responding to our initial treatment protocol, we decided to examine him thoroughly under anaesthesia”.

Dr. Da Silva consulted with Dr. Petrick, who agreed that surgery was the best option. The operation was performed at CCF on 6 January, with Dr. Petrick bringing his own special ophthalmology tools. Dr. Petrick has practised in Windhoek for approximately 10 years and occasionally makes his services available to assist veterinarians with domestic animals. Khayjay’s surgery marks the first time he has operated on a cheetah.

“Khayjay’s problem is the result of long-term inflammation, and the procedure I performed is fairly simple”, said Dr. Petrick. “Khayjay seemed to respond well to the surgery. We anticipate he will make a quick recovery and have full use of the eye”.

During the surgery, Khayjay’s third eyelid was sutured shut to act as a natural bandage. It will remain closed for a few weeks to allow the eye to heal. Eye ointment is being applied five times a day. “The sutures are absorbable and will dissolve on their own. At that time, his eye should be well into the healing process and function normally”, said Dr. Da Silva.

““We are so pleased to have a resource like Dr. Petrick in the community who is willing to step outside of his normal practise and donate his services to help us with one of our orphan cheetahs”, said Dr. Laurie Marker, Founder and Executive Director of CCF. “We don’t have many veterinarian specialists in the country, so having an interested human specialist is wonderful. Having healthy eyes and clear vision is just as important to cheetahs as it is for people.”

We are very pleased to share that our cheetahs are all healthy and well as we enter our dry season!

P.S. GlobalGiving's first matching opportunity of 2015 is Wednesday, March 18th! GlobalGiving is offering a 30% match on all donations up to $1,000 per donor per project, while funds remain. There is $60,000 available in matching and matching begins at 9:00:01 EDT and lasts until funds run out or 23:59:59 EDT. There is also $2,000 in bonus prizes available! 

Romeo Has Been Settling in Nicely at CCF
Romeo Has Been Settling in Nicely at CCF
Windhoek Ophthalmologist Helps Save Cheetahs Eyes
Windhoek Ophthalmologist Helps Save Cheetahs Eyes
KhayJay is Healing Well
KhayJay is Healing Well

Links:

Mar 6, 2015

Keeping our Livestock Healthy!

LSGD Help Protect our Farm Animals
LSGD Help Protect our Farm Animals

February was International Hoof Care Month! Cheetahs don't have hoofs you say? That is correct, but CCF also cares for goats, sheep, and cattle and provides training for farmers. Proper hoof care is very important in keeping unwanted predators at bay. Luckily, we have our Livestock Guarding Dogs to help protect them and other animals!

Limping animals - goats, sheep, and cattle - lag behind and can be the weaker animals that become tempting prey for predators. Also, if these animals are limping behind the herd, trying to keep up, they are not able to eat as much and then they become thin and unhealthy.

To keep our goats healthy, our dairy goats also get to enjoy a tasty afternoon snack while getting rid of any unwanted intestinal parasites. Using Hoegger Supply Company’s Herbal Dewormer powder, we were able to combine it with molasses to create bite sized treats they come running for. Intestinal parasites are a common problem in many livestock animals all around the world and by feeding an all-natural dewormer once a week, CCF keeps their parasite loads to a minimal. Healthy goats are happy goats!

In other Livestock Guarding Dog news, Happy Belated Birthday to our Kangal sisters, Kiri and Karibib, who were born on 10 February 2010! Both of these females are originally from Germany, but were brought to Namibia to work on a farm protecting livestock. A few years later, the farmer no longer needed the two dogs, as he sold his livestock, and asked if CCF would like them. Now, both the dogs are part of CCF's Livestock Guarding Dog Programme, which provides Namibian farmers with training in predator friendly livestock management and with puppies to help protect their livestock from predators. In return, less predators are killed and the farmers profit from the reduction in their livestock losses. Karibib also acts as an outreach ambassador and is used to teach people about our LSGD program. We hope you enjoy the picture below of Kiri on her big day!

If you want to help CCF keep cheetahs and other predators away from local farmer's livestock please consider please help sponsor our Livestock Guarding Dogs!

P.S. GlobalGiving's first matching opportunity of 2015 is Wednesday, March 18th! GlobalGiving is offering a 30% match on all donations up to $1,000 per donor per project, while funds remain. There is $60,000 available in matching and matching begins at 9:00:01 EDT and lasts until funds run out or 23:59:59 EDT. There is also $2,000 in bonus prizes available!

A Male Goat Enjoys a Deworming Molasses Treat
A Male Goat Enjoys a Deworming Molasses Treat
Happy Birthday Kiri!
Happy Birthday Kiri!
Dec 9, 2014

Meet B2, CCF's youngest Orphan Cheetah!

B2 at 5 months
B2 at 5 months

Named after a friend of CCF, B2 arrived at CCF in August when he was just 4 months old. As a young cub without his mother, B2 required lots of care and staff attention and resources to keep him fed, healthy and happy!

It has now been four months since we rescued this amazing cheetah and he is doing very well and has made a full recovery here at CCF. On 4 December, also International Cheetah Day, B2 ran with the lure for the first time! This was very exciting and he was curious and responded very well.

Currently, CCF keepers are working to bond B2 with another solo male, Pheonix (one of our hand raised orphans who is six years old). Hopefully, before too long, the two males can share the same enclosure. When we first began introducing B2 to our other cats, he would sit with his back against the enclosure's fence, and ignore the other cats as they vocalized and hissed. With time and paitence, we are very please to share that they are doing well now! We are very excited about how they are getting on. A slow process, though, spending a few hours a day together with us monitoring closely. B2 really seems to enjoy his new pal.

Rescue efforts like this take a lot of staff time and resources, and can be very costly. We are very pleased that members of the local community know that they can depend on CCF to help care for wounded and orphaned cheetahs. Rescues such B2's would not be possible without your support.

 

B2
B2's first time running with the lure
B2 (7 months) bonding with Phoenix
B2 (7 months) bonding with Phoenix
B2 is growing very quickly! He is now 8.5 months.
B2 is growing very quickly! He is now 8.5 months.
 
   

donate now:

An anonymous donor will match all new monthly recurring donations, but only if 75% of donors upgrade to a recurring donation today.
Terms and conditions apply.
Make a monthly recurring donation on your credit card. You can cancel at any time.
Make a donation in honor or memory of:
What kind of card would you like to send?
How much would you like to donate?
  • $20
    (USD)
    give
  • $50
    (USD)
    give
  • $100
    (USD)
    give
  • $200
    (USD)
    give
  • $5,000
    (USD)
    give
  • $20
    each month

    (USD)
    give
  • $50
    each month

    (USD)
    give
  • $100
    each month

    (USD)
    give
  • $200
    each month

    (USD)
    give
  • $5,000
    each month

    (USD)
    give
  • $
    give
gift Make this donation a gift, in honor of, or in memory of someone?

Reviews of Cheetah Conservation Fund

Great Nonprofits
Read and write reviews about Cheetah Conservation Fund on GreatNonProfits.org.
WARNING: Javascript is currently disabled or is not available in your browser. GlobalGiving makes extensive use of Javascript and will not function properly with Javascript disabled. Please enable Javascript and refresh this page.