Dec 6, 2017

One Village at a Time

Green Building Academy Flyer
Green Building Academy Flyer
One Village at a Time
Hero School's Democratic Education model presents a dynamic interdisciplinary curriculum that guides student-driven, community-based projects that address genuine community needs. The school will cultivate a new generation of entrepreneurs, uniquely skilled and equipped to lead their communities with innovative solutions for the future. Privately contracted construction projects will provide practicum opportunities for students, income for the school, and expand awareness and practice of sustainable building. In 2018 our students, construction team and volunteers are going to use the lessons learned from building all over the world to improve infrastructure for each aldea (village) in San Juan Comalapa. By doing this, we anticipate that we will change what the public expects from its elected officials. Future politicians will have to improve their approach to seek election. Our intention is that eventually the presidency of Guatemala, and leadership globally, will be affected by this positive approach to community development.
This was the first year that the newly evolved curriculum had been enacted in the classrooms of 7th and 8th grade. Outeachers took the theory into practice and have built both a smoke efficient stove (shown in this photo below) and an underground water tank for two different families of our students that were in need. In their classes they chose the families through surveys in social studies, worked out the project in math class and practiced their ask in Kaqchikel class. 
Green Building Academy 2018
We are thrilled to announce our first two Academy dates! 2018 is going to be a big year and we need your help to make it successful. It's as easy as saving and sharing the flyer attached to get the word out! More info also at: www.lwhome.org/academy
Do you believe green building can be a way to improve social and economic development? Are you interested in learning to build your own home and live off-grid? Want to explore more sustainable techniques and processes? This is your answer! 
R2R Salisbury's Biggest Year Yet!!
Seventh annual Rubbish to Runway Salisbury took place on October 14, 2017 at the stunning Blue Ocean Music Hall in Salisbury, MA. Mayor of Newburyport, Donna Holaday, was the emcee and Adrienne Montezinos was the Mistress of Organization. Over thirty-five pieces of wearable art walked down the runway. With so many creative designs and re-purposing of waste, the volunteer crew of Rubbish created such a buzz that tickets were SOLD OUT days before the event! Thank you to Elizabeth, Nancy, and all the amazing volunteers that made this a huge success! Make sure you don't miss out next year and save the date October 13, 2018. www.rubbishtorunway.org 
Fall 2017 Volunteer Groups 
This fall our Volunteer Coordinator Sarah had her hands full with back to back groups. Each group helped us move along tremendously and were positive energy around the site! We had several returning groups with Thrive Global, Leap Now (x2!) and Temple Beth Am. We even had an inspiring visit and day of volunteering from Habitat for Humanity! Ream more about their experiences with us here!: https://www.lwhome.org/newsletter-nov-2017 
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Thank you for your interest in our work. We appreciate your support and always enjoy the opportunity to share our stories with you, the people that make them possible!
In Gratitude, 
The Long Way Home Team
Rubbish to Runway Salisbury
Rubbish to Runway Salisbury
Fall Volunteer Groups
Fall Volunteer Groups
Oct 30, 2017

A Delicious Failure

Smoothies for all 118 students
Smoothies for all 118 students

This project report is a submission to GlobalGiving’s 2017 Fail Forward Contest, where organizations are asked to share a story of when they tried something new that didn’t go as planned and how they learned from it. Enjoy!

In 2015, a survey conducted by Gabriela Queme revealed that more than 30% of our students were arriving to school each morning with very little to nothing in their stomachs. This resulted in lack of attention during school, acting out, and most commonly stomach aches from hunger. As an organization we decided that something must be done to remedy this and improve their studies as well. We decided to start a "Licuado Program" - giving fruit smoothies to all the students each morning. The idea was not just the fruit smoothies (which is something very common in the community), but to then be able to add in nutritious elements such as greens (spinach, kale or chard) also flaxseed and amaranth - which we could grow in our gardens. The really great part about the Licuado Program was that it wasn’t solely the idea of foreign administrators. We posed the problem to the parents and they started a committee of 12 mothers to do all the organization and planning needed to begin the program.

At the beginning it was a beautiful collaboration of the NGO administrators simply guiding the mothers in some organization and we quickly found out that management of other parents is where they succeeded. They came together and donated majority of the tools needed for the program - all the cups, cutting boards, knives and one of the blenders. LWH provided another blender and juicer. It was decided that the program would be run by three to four mothers who volunteered to help each morning accompanied by one staff member to provide support and help cut fruit.

The parents initially developed the menu, but staff members saw a need to compromise on ingredients. While the mothers were used to smoothie recipes based on just fruit and sugar, staff members wanted to avoid adding sugar and instead add a choice of greens or flaxseed. Nonetheless, neither of these guidelines lasted. After the first week the mothers said that the kids were not drinking them because the smoothies needed sugar. We negotiated to just one cup of local honey for the entire barrel. They said this approach still wasn’t enough, so we re-negotiated to one cup of honey and one cup of brown sugar. We experimented with beets and carrots, but most kids were not fans of these additions.

As the program progressed it became clear that on days when a LWH staff member was not there to help, no greens or flaxseed were added in. One day we came back and the ENTIRE 5lb bag of sugar was used in just one day, when it should have been a week’s supply. We realized that the education behind the core reasoning for the program was missing. The parents knew their kids were hungry and they were suffering in their courses. But they did not know enough about healthy and balanced diets to understand the value of the added nutrients (flax/amaranth and greens). If they understood these reasonings for including strange new foods rather than simply being told they were “better”, the parents may have been more motivated to follow the guidelines.

Lamentably, concerns about the nutritional content of the smoothies were not the only issue with the program. A stark reality of Guatemalan culture is that there can be a tendency towards jealousy and harmful gossip. Problems stemming from these counterproductive behaviors eventually destroyed the committee of mothers. They all pushed each other out, one mother after another. Mothers would stop showing up for their duty. This was exacerbated by the fact that no one could agree on a consequence that was appropriate and that would not be detrimental to a low-income family. Soon only half the committee was coming, then they were only coming a few times a week instead of everyday. Eventually we had to just hire two people to come and prepare the licuados each morning. Besides the interpersonal conflicts with the committee, there were financial complications as well. It became a hassle for school staff to organize buying the necessary fruits and the whole endeavour was prohibitively expensive.

While these conflicts led to the unfortunate end of the Licuado Program, this is not to say that there were not substantial benefits and lessons learned. In the one school year this smoothie program ran, there were many successful outcomes. The teachers noted that the smoothies had a positive impact on school performance. The students were a bit better behaved in class and fewer kids went home sick or with stomach aches throughout the year. Students did have to go to the bathroom more often but overall were more focused in class. In community surveys, many parents expressed their deep gratitude for the program. For lots of families, it was one of their favorite things about our school.

The Licuado Program was one of the first projects that community members beyond our employees took a big leadership role in. We always talk about how LWH is constantly experimenting with green construction methods, but we are also always trying out new ideas and processes in the rest of our work. This was an experiment with local leadership in which we learned a lot about how best to guide community members and what resources they might need to successfully implement a program. One of the key takeaways was the need for education first. In the case of the smoothies, if we had spent more time up front providing nutritional information then the committee might have better understood our perspective on the ingredients. Learning from this example, we have taken a different approach with our curriculum development. Currently many of our teachers are involved with creating a unique curriculum based on the principles of democratic education and hands-on learning. At the beginning of this process we spent a lot of time discussing the philosophies of democratic education and making our goals clear. We believe that taking the time to make sure everyone is on the same page and has all of the necessary resources has been instrumental.

Another fundamental lesson from this experience was the need for clear organization from the beginning. Not only did the committee of mothers not begin with strict guidelines and well-defined expectations, but there were also no consequences for not completing their duties. We should have set up reasonable consequences before starting. Similarly, on the financial side there could have been more initial organization to create a more realistic budget and system of purchasing required materials. Although we wanted the committee of mothers to really take charge of this program, they really needed more organizational support and direction. Just how much responsibility they needed to take on was perhaps too unclear. We wanted to give them the opportunity to run the program but we also had certain requirements that we wanted to meet, which ultimately created an unclear situation.

All in all, we are proud that we were able to feed each of our students a smoothie every day for a full school year. We remind ourselves of the benefits that this experiment provided the members of our school and we feel fortunate for the learning opportunity. In our current programs we have improved in our approach to better support local leadership through initial education and more thorough organization.

Long Way Home believes that we only truly succeed in innovation when we are honest and open about our missteps and learn from them. Since we are always experimenting, we are constantly evolving based on what works well and what needs adjustment, whether it is through education, construction or administration. We are proud to be a part of GlobalGiving’s Fail Forward initiative and grateful for the opportunity to share what we learned from our delicious failure.

~Thank you, Gracias y Matiyox!

Adding greens to the barrel!
Adding greens to the barrel!
Delivering licuados to his class
Delivering licuados to his class
Que rico! How delicious!
Que rico! How delicious!
Sep 7, 2017

Summer of Growth

Jesse explaining the benefits of a good compost
Jesse explaining the benefits of a good compost

This summer at Long Way Home has been a growing experience for all. Our middle school students have been working with a local Peace Corps volunteer to start a seed bank at the school; the construction crew is expanding to a new project for financial sustainability; the new curriculum was presented to the Guatemalan National Curriculum board, and more!

In July, Jesse, one of the Peace Corps volunteers in Comalapa, started a project with our middle school students to begin a garden specifically to create a seed bank. We will be one of 2-3 pilot projects in the community that will hopefully expand with great success. This two-terrace garden will grow native plants that are simple to harvest seeds from and grow food. They started with building an efficient compost pile. The next assignment was preparing the garden beds, then testing the soil. We are now waiting for the seeds so that we can plant them! Students are learning the hands-on benefit of growing your own food and the sustainability of collecting your own seeds to continue the process for years. Seeds are a large expense in agriculture in Guatemala and there are very few practices which allow for the people to continue to grow the same crops without buying new seeds each season. We are very excited to be part of the pilot program in Comalapa.

This year Técnico Chixot Construction crew has taken on a project that is proving the financial sustainability model for the school. The majority of our construction crew are now working to build a private home and large tire retaining walls around the property in one of the villages of Comalapa. We were also able to employ 25 more Comalapans in the construction crew. This project is enabling us to continue employing our full crew while also providing about 80% of the operational funds LWH needs to run the school. This is one of the first official construction projects that is proving the school model of financial sustainability, which we look forward to growing to support 100% of operations for Centro Educativo Técnico Chixot. Please keep us in mind if you would like to build sustainably while supporting a great cause!

The Comalapan team of Técnico Chixot are building the school as a site of Democratic Education. In doing so, it supports the creation of a democratic society, in part, through an educational process where teaching and learning is participatory, empowering, and emancipatory. Democratic Education provides pathways for individuals to think critically, work cooperatively, and assume the roles necessary to build a socially just and sustainable world. Because of this, Democratic Education can be a formidable force of change for all those involved and the places in which they live. In a Democratic Education setting, students, teachers, and community members can be transformed into heroes who can courageously take their place in the world as responsible citizens and creative entrepreneurs working for social change.

Our hardworking teachers presented this new curriculum that they have been developing to the Guatemalan National Curriculum (CNB) board this last month. The board was very interested in all the work they have accomplished so far. They asked our team for their analysis of the national curriculum, and hope to be able to include that in their revisions coming up in the next year. They were very impressed with all that our teachers had done and told them to keep moving forward con gusto!

Presenting new curriculum to Guatemala National
Presenting new curriculum to Guatemala National
Library is colorful and ready for books!
Library is colorful and ready for books!
Construction for CETC financial sustainability
Construction for CETC financial sustainability

Links:

 
WARNING: Javascript is currently disabled or is not available in your browser. GlobalGiving makes extensive use of Javascript and will not function properly with Javascript disabled. Please enable Javascript and refresh this page.