Feed 200 Zimbabwean Orphans

 
$240,908
$59,092
Raised
Remaining
Mar 25, 2013

March 2013 Zimkids Update

Our Elders are cooking up a storm for our kids.
Our Elders are cooking up a storm for our kids.

The past few weeks at Zimkids have been exciting, so let me try to boil it all down:

 

The big news: Across Zimbabwe, only 18.4 percent of high school students passed their national exams, but 70 percent of our Zimkids prevailed. Those results were deeply satisfying, as you can imagine. All that tutoring, encouragement and training really paid off. We are paying for those students continue to the second level of secondary school – Advanced Level.

 

One of the others, Samantha, is running a new program we began for three to six year olds who are with us every day 9am to 3pm. This program offers a feeding program using a high-nutrient supplement that is receiving rave reviews in South Africa.  The latest, and littlest, Zimkids, are already learning English, reading and taking their first tentative steps onto computers.

 

Tinashe is busier than ever in the Tech Center, continuing his training with the older children even as he begins training both the small newcomers, including some three-year-olds, and the caregivers, including 80 year-old grandmothers who have never actually touched a computer.  

 Go to our website – www.zimkids.com - to see the latest video news or, if you are on facebook you can find the videos on our facebook page www.facebook.com/zimkids.

Our greenhouse and open air vegetable garden is back in full swing following an invasion of army worms that demolished our vegetable garden in December.  They literally climbed the walls in the thousands and ate like locusts.  We are growing kale, spinach, tomatoes and butternut squash and even have a field of sunflowers.  Also the kids brout=ght in seeds for mango and advocado trees for our planned orchard.

 We’ve made a terrific new alliance with Contact, a local counseling center funded by the German and Greek governments. They will be offering workshops for our staff, for the older children, and the caregivers, and are making their professional staff available when we confront difficult family situations. They run a counseling training program, usually limited to candidates over the age of 25. But they have agreed to include Sithabisiwe, who will begin training part-time in March.

 

The Center is in beautiful condition, being carefully maintained by its builders. We recently added a roof for shading over the 15 meter art table behind the resource center. Built entirely by former trainees with the help of current ones. We are expecting the container being shipped from the States to arrive in Mozambique the end of April.  We will be doubling our library offerings, adding the donated sewing machines to our programs and myriad other supplies and educational materials.

 

Some wonderful new friends in New York are working on a Bra drive because bras are expensive and in short supply here. We’d also talked about doing something to address the awful problem of the high cost of sanitary napkins. At first, we’d thought about a fundraising drive for reusable pads, but our physician here protested because of the difficulty of keeping them sanitary. Instead, we’re investigating the possibility of borrowing a page from a terrific Indian group that has invented three machines that allow for the creation of a small-scale sanitary napkin factory. The biggest challenge is sourcing the materials needed here. So many businesses are closed or closing, but we’re excited by the possibility of opening a small business that would provide experience, employment, and the cheapest sanitary pads in the country! That would be a wonderful addition to our training program for girls, which is continuing with welding. They are in the midst of welding shelving for our expanded library and storage room.  This requires them to plan the size, shape, and height to fit the space so they are getting a lesson in drafting. Then they have to measure and cut the pieces and finally weld so that the shelf is level. The girls are in great need of experience in planning, organizing and administration as we move forward with microenterprises for them. A small factory would certainly provide them with on-the-job training. So as we look into the possibility - we hope the necessary materials can be sourced locally. 

Tinashe with his first class of little ones.
Tinashe with his first class of little ones.
Maintaining the Center facilities
Maintaining the Center facilities
Angel is tutoring our first graders
Angel is tutoring our first graders

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Project Leader

Dennis Gaboury

Chair, Board of Trustees
Bulawayo, Zimbabwe

Where is this project located?

Map of Feed 200 Zimbabwean Orphans