Feed 200 Zimbabwean Orphans

 
$243,128
$56,872
Raised
Remaining
Dec 11, 2014

Zimkids Elders volunteer to help other orphans!.

Our outreach kids joined us after school.
Our outreach kids joined us after school.

Thank you to all our supporters for making Zimkids a true success story.  Happy holidays to all.

Zimkids’ latest program is taking our young people 7 miles from our center and a world away, beyond the edge of the city into a small settlement of crude shacks, without water or electricity, into a world where children’s prospects are even dimmer than they are in Pumula, where we operate. 70 percent of the children in the community are orphans; most of the teenage girls already have two or more kids, usually by two or more fathers. So babies are raising babies.

 For our older kids, going to Methodist, as the community is called, is giving back, taking their days off to transfer the skills they’ve acquired at Zimkids, bringing joy and knowledge where there is so little. We tried something similar several years back with the families squatting at the dumpsite, but it was simply too far away – and our older kids did not yet have the initiative. That has changed now, and our seniors and alumni are doing an amazing job at Methodist – and we hope to find the money for a vehicle that will allow this to become a formal Zimkids program.

 Meanwhile, back at the Center, we’re gearing up for a whole new cohort of kids to enter our vocational training program and become leaders in our outreach effort at Methodist. They just sat their O-level examinations (following the traditional British system, Zimbabwe has two levels of high school, Ordinary and Advanced level, with the latter being primary for those oriented toward university education.) Results will not be out until February, but we expect that most of our young people will not pass since they received little education during primary school, a time when teachers were on strike for several years. Usually, our pass rate is well above the national average, but that’s not saying much since, nationally, only 1 in 5 children pass their exams.

 So we’re bringing in supplies for welding and sewing, construction and carpentry – and Samantha is looking forward to extra help in the preschool, where she’ll be training childcare workers.

 Our littlest Zimkids celebrated their graduation in late November, and they are more than ready for Grade 1. They not only know the alphabet and basic numbers, taken their first steps toward mastering computers, and have been awash in the books generous donors have been sending their way. While they’re been with us, they’ve been well-nourished, thanks to our feeding program and our abundant garden; well-dressed because of donations of shoes from the Buckner Foundation; and warm because of the Texas grandmothers, who keep making them amazing blankets.

 Once they’re in school, we won’t lose track of them, of course, since they’ll be back at “home” with us on weekends and over school holidays.

Nkosi introduces computer to kids at outreach
Nkosi introduces computer to kids at outreach
Samantha on day off works with our newest Zimkids
Samantha on day off works with our newest Zimkids
Some of our little ones at outreach
Some of our little ones at outreach
Our Graduates!!!
Our Graduates!!!

Links:

Aug 11, 2014

Feeding hearts, minds and stomachs - August 2014

Gathering a bumper crop in our greenhouse
Gathering a bumper crop in our greenhouse

There are times when we feel that Zimkids has taken on a life of its own as the young people we’ve trained for so many years take on increasing responsibility and help us expand our wings. It’s an exhilarating reality since we’re committed not only to feeding the orphans of Pumula but to training them to lead.

 Several years ago, a grant from the U.S. embassy allowed us to install a greenhouse with drip irrigation. It took a while to develop a workable system since we never managed to hit water when we tried to drill a well. But now, our young people have honed their modern agricultural skills. Despite a total absence of rain since April, we are awash in tomatoes, spinach, kale and onions– so the orphans have an abundance of fresh produce.

 Our pre-school – run by “alumae” - is humming with energy and excitement. The children are mastering the alphabet, learning their first words in English, playing on our computers, eating nutritious meals – and even developing their skills in sharing by serving lunch to their classmates. Several weeks ago – in the midst of a serious cold snap – they were thrilled at the arrival of stacks of blankets made by a group of generous grandmothers from Texas led by Dee Duhe, shoes from the Buckner Foundation and underwear – a first for many of them – from several donors. They even received new reading material thanks to Adopt-a-Book!

 The older children are also moving along to new challenges. Now that our new sewing center is up and running, all the children are learning about needles and thread – and how to take care of and mend their often tattered clothing. The latest shipment we received included ELEVEN sewing machines, thanks to the miraculous Dee Duhe of Plano, Texas. So, not only are our young people now taking care of their own clothing, they’re mastering the basics of cutting and stitching as part of our vocational training program. Under the guidance of two girls who are long-time Zimkids, they are helping to make school uniforms that we will begin selling in November, when parents prepare for the new school year.

 Across the compound, other young people are building chairs as part of our carpentry vocational training program, even as their friends are welding shoe racks and figuring out the basics of design. We’ve already had our first orders for their creations – and are confident that more will follow!

 Some days, we look at the activity – planned and run by orphans who joined Zimkids seven or eight years ago – and marvel at their skills in organization and their ability to comfort so many young children who live in almost impossible situations at home. Life is incredibly difficult outside our walls: Water and electricity continue to be scarce, the economy has stalled, so unemployment is stagnating at about 90 percent; and the grandparents or other relatives who care for our orphans are staggering under the burden, all too often becoming indifferent if not abusive.

 But inside our gates, the Zimkids are smiling. If they are sick, or injured, or upset, they know that they’ll be cared for, whether by our counselor, our doctor, or one of their adopted older brothers and sisters. They never go hungry. And they are learning the skills, both personal and vocational, to build their own futures. What more could we want?

 There is one more thing: We’d love you and the American children you know to meet them via Skype. Now that our Internet is working most of the. We’re anxious to set up more conversations between Zimkids and American schools, kids’ clubs or church groups. Our Zimbabwean young people tend to be a bit shy, but we’ve been working to increase their comfortable level, both with the technology and with distant strangers. So if you know a group that might be interested in connecting contact us at dennis@zimkids.com. 

Little ones take turns serving lunch
Little ones take turns serving lunch
The children are thrilled with their new blankets
The children are thrilled with their new blankets
Lindiwe & Charity run intro to sewing for ZImkids
Lindiwe & Charity run intro to sewing for ZImkids
Zimkids reaches out to those in need
Zimkids reaches out to those in need
Girls made a shoe rack for ZImkids and a client
Girls made a shoe rack for ZImkids and a client

Links:

May 21, 2014

May 2014 Update

Foster showing the boys bricklaying 101!
Foster showing the boys bricklaying 101!

Last Saturday, I arrived late at our Center in Pumula, and this is what I found:

 

Foster Dingani and Collen Makurumidze were training and supervising a crew of younger boys and, in two days, they almost had the brick foundation of our new Sewing Center completed – plumb, square and level! Three years ago, when I told our Seniors that we were going to build the Center ourselves, Foster admits that he thought that I was a crazy old man. Now, he’s the teacher – and I no longer need to get my hands dirty!

 

Foster didn’t join Zimkids on his own initiative; his grandmother ordered him to attend just after he lost his father and his mother moved back to her rural home, 200 miles away. “For the first year, I only went because I was forced,” he admits. “Then, I wanted to spend all my time; it was just too stressful at home. If not for Zimkids, I don’t know what I’d be doing now. I’d probably be hanging out at the shops drinking like everyone else.”

 

Having skills is essential for him since he is raising his younger sister and his niece.

 

Collen, whose father died when he was four years old, was sent to Zimkids by his mother, who lives in an 18x18 foot one bedroom house with Collen, his sister and her two children. He quickly became our “artist in residence,” creating some of our most amazing dolls and teaching our younger children to draw. He and Foster are our resident builders – and Collen has now finished a course in electrical installation.

 

They haven’t just learned all the basic construction skills. Perhaps more important, they’ve learned how to learn. Recently, they were revamping and updating our solar grid and hit a wall: Something was wrong in one of their connections and they couldn’t figure it out. That night, they each went home and searched the net for answers, intent on finding a solution before the arrival of our solar expert the next day. At 5:30 a.m., Collen called Foster. “I have a couple of ideas,” he said. “Let’s do it. Let’s figure it out!” By 7 am, our mini-grid was functioning perfectly – and Foster and Collen realized the power of not giving up.

 

As I left the building site, I ran into Lindiwe Mabhena, who wanted to show me the new primary school uniform she’d completed. With Charity, Lindiwe will run the sewing center, a project that will provide income both for our older girls and Zimkids, as well as training for younger girls.

 

Pauline Mhendo was moving around between the kitchen, where the older girls were cleaning; the resource center, where Sithebisiwe and the group of girls were working with our younger dollmakers; and the playground, where a few of the toddlers from our weekday preschool program were hanging out. “You know, I’ve been thinking,” she said, pulling me aside to talk about her latest idea for cutting costs on the program. That’s Pauline, a seamless multitasker, natural organizer, and superb planner.

 

Pauline joined Zimkids after the death of her mother in 2005. Just 28 years old, she’d lost her husband ten years earlier. Pauline moved in with her grandmother who sold veggies at a street-side stand, but she, too, passed away, leaving Pauline to live with her aunt and uncle. Pauline was always one of Pumula’s best students, and when she passed her Ordinary Levels with flying colors, we sent her to a church-run boarding school not far from town for her Advanced Levels. Now, two years after she completed her education, she’s essentially acting as our assistant director.

 

I look around then, in near-awe. We – the trustees and staff, the volunteers and you, the donors – are succeeding almost beyond our wildest hopes.

 

Not everything is rosy, of course. We still struggle to maintain the health of our HIV-positive young people. And too many families continue to treat our orphans abusively. Most importantly, we’re still stymied by the realities of Zimbabwe: Zimkids is working, but the country is not. After years of runaway inflation that reached 360 MILLION percent, in 2009 government suspended the local currency and moved toward the use of the dollar. The economy began to stabilize and business to rebound. But this year, things have begun sliding back in the wrong direction.

 

Transparency International Corruption Index ranks Zimbabwe 163 out of 174 countries. So far this year, Zimbabwe’s Registrar of Companies has struck more than 176 companies off the register and they expect to deregister another 634 companies over the next three months. Over 70 percent of the country’s exporting companies have shut down. Every day, we hear about another business that has filed for bankruptcy, another shop that simply can’t make it.

 

The solar energy company that had hoped to launch Foster and Collen into a business as their subcontractors hasn't had the capital to do so. And while they have both completed advanced training courses – Foster in boilermaking and Collen in electrical installation – neither can find a paid internship, a necessary step for their licenses, and neither can afford to work for free.

 

For the moment, then, we’re concentrating on helping our beneficiaries develop skills that will allow them to work on their own – whether by selling and installing low-cost solar panels, welding metal burglar bars, or sewing school uniforms. Our kids are ready…all they need is a chance. 

Collen is teaching Shaun
Collen is teaching Shaun
Lindiwe and Charity model the uniforms they made
Lindiwe and Charity model the uniforms they made
Pauline supervises kitchen &kids enjoy the results
Pauline supervises kitchen &kids enjoy the results
Pauline leads talk on relationships with our girls
Pauline leads talk on relationships with our girls

Links:

Feb 18, 2014

February, 2014 Update

Brian Dube in 2009
Brian Dube in 2009

Zimkids has just marked the fifth anniversary of the death of Brian, a 10-year-old Zimkid born with HIV but undiagnosed and untreated until we intervened with his family. By then, his immune system was seriously compromised. He had contracted tuberculosis. And while we managed to get him on antiretroviral drugs and a TB regimen, it was too late. The day we drove his body to be buried at his rural home, we decided to honor Brian with a vow of “NEVER AGAIN.” All of our children were tested for HIV, those who are positive are enrolled at the local pediatric AIDS clinic for drug treatment, and we can now mark five years without a funeral.

 

It isn’t easy, unfortunately. Several months ago, Cynthia, who is 16 years old, fell ill. When we took her to the clinic, doctors realized that her antiretroviral treatment had stopped working and that she had tuberculosis. Happily, she was quickly put on a new drug regimen and beat back the TB. She is once again at school, thriving.

 

We’re still struggling with the health of Langilihle, also 16. Although the local pediatric AIDS center sees her regularly, the doctors there missed the fact that her antiretroviral regimen was no longer working. We struggled to get her help, waiting in long queues to little avail. We discovered that the only way to avoid waiting hours for attention at the emergency room was to arrange an ambulance to take her to the hospital. –Although we avoided the wait, the ambulance drivers who transported her were drunk, dropped her on the way from her house to the ambulance and stopped en route to the hospital for bananas! IV drips increased her strength, and her drug regimen was changed. Still, every day, Langilihle’s family has to carry her a mile each day to the local clinic for her TB drugs.  We’re optimistic, but she’s not yet out of the woods.

 

A dozen times a month, the health of our children challenges us, and not just because of HIV. This week’s struggle involves Bukhosi, 14 years old. He recently enrolled in Zimkids and we were immediately alarmed by the condition of his knee. It turned out that while home in the rural area when he was 6, he had broken his knee – and received appallingly bad treatment at the local hospital. Pieces of bone remain that has caused infections for the last 8 years. Now, his knee is badly infected again. We took him for an x-ray and Dr Sashka said that we will treat the infections until he is fully grown and then find a surgeon to remove the pieces.  Getting surgery here is very risky and she thinks it is better to wait.

 

Even as we battle to keep everyone healthy, we’re keeping our focus on building the young people in other ways. As I hope you’ve seen from the photographs we’re posting on our Facebook page (search zimkids orphan trust), our pre-school program is thriving almost beyond our wildest dreams. Our program was designed and is run by Samantha Jumira, 18, who has been with Zimkids since she was 10 years old. The local kindergarten teachers were so impressed with the training of the children who “graduated” last year that we had lines of people at our gate looking for places for their kids.

 

We’ve begun the process of certification for a licensed crèche, which means we can charge fees to non-orphans to cover the expenses of our orphans and make the crèche entirely self-supporting. At present we do not charge. We’d already sent Samantha for professional training, and she’s now about to receive her license. Pauline and Sithabisiwe, who’ve been working with Samantha, have started the same training. Our ability to serve the children well is bolstered by the counseling training we arranged for Sithabisiwe, who is about to finish a year-long course taught by European psychologists, the youngest person ever to do so. In fact, all 18 of her classmates, all older than her by a decade or more, quit the course. We’re hoping to open our doors to fee-paying non-orphans in January.

 

We’re getting ready to launch yet another training/income-generating project, a school uniform business. All Zimbabwean children are required to wear uniforms to school, and they’re an enormous financial burden on families. So we’ve sent two of our girls, Lindiwe and Charity, who are competent seamstresses to an advanced tailoring course so that we can produce uniforms below the cost charged in town – and train the younger girls in skills that can sustain them. Our hope is that as each group of girls become competent, we can send them off to open their own small businesses – perhaps with sewing machines because of the generosity of our amazing Texan grandmother Dee!

 

No, we haven’t neglected the vocational training programs we began with the construction of our Center. Colin and Foster, two of the first trainees, are now teaching the younger boys and girls to lay brick, repair equipment and weld. (In fact, one of our sewing trainees, Lindiwe, has just finished welding a new railing at our site!) They will take the lead in the construction of our new sewing building – and, no, Dennis does not need to break his back to help them. In fact, they are now so skilled that the local dealer of solar panels and hot water heaters hires them whenever he has work. “I tried out two other boys, but they just couldn’t cut it,” he told Dennis. “YOUR boys I can just drop off to do installations because they know how to weld, to build, to wire, and to work!”

 

So, even as we struggle with regular medical nightmares and with an economy that has now waned beyond collapse, we’re still bringing joy, education and serious futures to a wonderful group of orphans – because of your help and support.

 

Look forward to our next report, which should include this year’s high school and primary school examination results. Last year, our Zimkids beat the national pass rate by 300 percent – and we’re keeping our fingers crossed for 400 percent this time round!

Langilihle and I to clinic for her daily TB tablet
Langilihle and I to clinic for her daily TB tablet
Pauline teaching computer games to two little ones
Pauline teaching computer games to two little ones
Charity and Lindiwe are ready for sewing class!
Charity and Lindiwe are ready for sewing class!
Ngqabutho training to do plumbing
Ngqabutho training to do plumbing
Multi-talented Lindiwe welding railing
Multi-talented Lindiwe welding railing

Links:

Dec 2, 2013

November/December 2013

Roseline, head of household, responsible for famil
Roseline, head of household, responsible for famil

Zimkids has been thriving and growing – but before providing you the latest details, can we ask a favor? On Dec. 3 beginning at noon east coast time until funds run out  Microsoft will match your donation to Zimkids 100 percent! A Microsoft logo will appear on our project page (below click on URL) if matching funds are available. BUT the closer to twelve the better, and only at THIS site: http://www.globalgiving.org/projects/vocational-training-for-200-zimbabwean-orphans/ 

 

Thanks so much.

 

In these updates, we thought that we should tell you a bit about the challenges we face, and we’ve dealt with a particularly difficult one over recent months. In July, one of our caregivers, 76 year-old Linah Ndlovu, fell ill. Linah cared for eight orphans, her grandchildren, between the ages of 1 and 16, and managed to keep them in school by cleaning for neighbors and school authorities. We worried, then, not just about her but also about all those children. So Tinashe spent days ferrying her back and forth to the hospital and breaking through the bureaucracy there to make sure she didn’t languish. Despite our best efforts, however, Linah died in mid-September. In Zimbabwe, proper funerals and burials are important, and Phillip and Tinashe made sure that Linah’s did her justice. They drove the Zimkids car carrying her coffin from the funeral parlor to Linah’s home, and spent the night with the children and neighbors to pay their final respects, leading the group in an all-night round of traditional African drumming and dancing. The next day, they drove the family to the cemetery and dug the grave in which Linah was buried. Ever since, we’ve been working 14 year old Roseline who now heads the family to make sure that her brother, sister and cousins ages 8 to 1 are cared for, fed and remain in school.

 

That’s one part of what Zimkids is about.

 

The other part, of course, is about the positive changes we are making in the lives of the children we serve, and we’re seeing it most vividly these days with our newest Zimkids, the 50 three-to-seven olds in the pre-school program we began last year. They include Nokuthula Mpofu, age 4, whose parents both died of AIDS.  She lives with her grandmother and seven other family members in three rooms. Since the grandmother is frequently ill and has no source of income, Nokuthula depends on the preschool feeding program for regular nutrition. Or Wayne Ncube, whose father died and whose mother abandoned him on the doorstep of an aunt when he was three months old. Mentally ill, the aunt can barely feed herself, not to mention Wayne. Or Lotrica Ngwenya, 6, born HIV positive. She lives with an aunt none too happy to have been left with the burden of a sick child after her parents died.

 

We just had our first “graduation” of our pre-school kids, complete with graduation robes (required by government) and the children are thriving: eating at the Centre daily, mastering computer games, and learning to read and write.

 

The rains have come so we planted our field. We bought more seeds to add to our garden and with the raining season around we have to start working on the outside garden. We planted carrots, cucumbers, chomolia (kale), green pepper and onions. Some of the seeds were put straight in the greenhouse while some of them were put in the nursery beds outside the greenhouse and will be transplanted as soon as they are seedlings.

 

The vocational training programs for the older children are moving along well, and our oldest children, who are awaiting the results of their high school exams, are working hard to master new skills. We’re hoping to find the money for some added space in order to begin a sewing program which will also generate income for us and for the young people we train through the sale of school uniform skirts made by our kids and priced affordably.

 

Finally, Tinashe, our director, just spent two months in the U.S., his first trip to America, and we had an amazing few weeks traveling across America thanks to our accumulated frequent flyer miles and the generous hosts around the country to thank many of you for your support, making new friends, and establishing relationships with new schools. The latter is important not just or fundraising but because the Skype conferences between our Zimbabwean children and their American counterparts are so important to awareness and understanding on both sides.

 

We end yet another year, then, with our hearts full of gratitude to our supporters and our amazing kids.

 

Happy holidays!

Wayne lives with neighbor when aunt disappears
Wayne lives with neighbor when aunt disappears
Professor, actual name, is ready for 1st grade
Professor, actual name, is ready for 1st grade
Lotrica is not quite sure of this outfit!
Lotrica is not quite sure of this outfit!
Director Tinashe with 1st grade Town Sch, San Fran
Director Tinashe with 1st grade Town Sch, San Fran
Preparing for TV interview about ZImkids in Alaska
Preparing for TV interview about ZImkids in Alaska

Links:

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Project Leader

Dennis Gaboury

Chair, Board of Trustees
Bulawayo, Zimbabwe

Where is this project located?

Map of Feed 200 Zimbabwean Orphans