Water System for Peace Demonstration Farm, Uganda

 
$10,772
$9,988
Raised
Remaining
mountain papaya and lyche seedlings
mountain papaya and lyche seedlings

I love teeny tiny baby plants. They are fragile and delicate and absolute perfection. It amazes me how a tiny inch high seedling can grow into a majestic ninety foot tree and live for hundreds of years.

As you know- at Peace Farm- one of our focuses is on diversity, and teaching people about higher priced cash crops so that they can sustainably support their families. Variety also provides the consumer with new and exciting crops, filling a special place in the market. After all, it gets rather tiring eating bananas every day!
Fortunately for us, we recently received an order of seeds which are just starting to pop up out of the soil. We plant the seeds in a mix of pumice and palm peat fertilized with vermi-compost from the worms I keep in my kitchen. The tiny babies are just starting to pop up out of the soil, and it is so exciting to watch their little bodies uncurl and their leaves unfold.
Our current babies include lyche trees, mountain papayas, cashew trees, oyster nut vines, horseradish, tamarillo, rhubarb, and pineapples. We have a lot more seeds to plant as well, so I'll update you on how the dragon fruit and persimmons turn out.
We are growing these crops at the farm, and we are also distributing them to the villagers to grow as well. We currently had our first tree distribution meeting and gave away sour sop trees, mulberry trees, oyster nut vines, cashew nut trees, and tamarillo trees. It was wonderful to hear the positive feedback from the community as they laughed about planting and creating miniature forests. I'm excited for the day when we can give out some of these new babies as well!

horseradish roots
horseradish roots
rubarb buds emerging from the soil
rubarb buds emerging from the soil
cashew apples
cashew apples
oyster nuts
oyster nuts
Mushrooms growing on a hanging garden
Mushrooms growing on a hanging garden

One of our many projects at the farm is Growing Mushrooms!

We have started growing a local variety of oyster mushroom using a mixture of cotton husk and coffee cherries as the growing medium. Both are common agricultural waste products here in Uganda so they are readily available. The medium is mixed with mycelium (the growing starter for the mushrooms) and hung vertically in plastic sacks to make hanging gardens.

The mushrooms can be harvested twice per week and are PACKED with vitamins so besides being delicious, they are healthy to eat, and anything that does not get eaten or sold can be dried in the sun for future use.

If out mushroom project is successful, it will be something that other local villagers can easily grow inside their own homes both for personal use, and to sell. 

Preparing the garden area
Preparing the garden area
Mycelium (basically mushroom seeds)
Mycelium (basically mushroom seeds)
Making the mushroom gardens
Making the mushroom gardens

Links:

a woman being trained to make re-usable pads
a woman being trained to make re-usable pads

Having your period in the village is an inconvenience to say the least.

Most rural women cannot afford the luxury of disposable pads, so they resort to stuffing their knickers with old rags, dried grass, and even rubbish they pick from the roadside. This is inefficient and unhygienic. Young girls have an even harder problem because if they are in school all day they are constantly worried about leaking and odor. Life is hard enough as a teenage girl, and the added threat of embarrassment is enough to prompt the girls to play hooky from school during their periods.  This causes them miss about five days of classes per month and as a result, their grades drop.

To help combat this, we in partnership with VGIF have been working on an initiative to teach our ladies and beneficiaries to make and use their own re-usable menstrual pads. Yes- this sounds kinda gross, but with proper care the pads are clean, hygenic, and FAR superior to stuffing your knickers with grass!

We brought in our own councelor, trainers, and training materials. Each woman was taught to make 2 of the reusable pads, and we also sold pre-made pads to the ladies at a subsidized rate of half the cost of making the pads to encourage their use.

It was a fun day filled with laughter, gossip, and chatting about other 'women's issues." It's wonderful when we can intigrate ourselves deeper into the community with a healthy mix of education and laughter.

re-usable menstrual pades
re-usable menstrual pades

Cooking with the sun is fun and easy, so long as it is a beautifil sunshiny day! Fortunately for us, that is exactly what we had when we held our VGIF funded eco-solar cooking training workshop at Peace Demonstration Farm.

We trained about 40 women to use solar reflector stoves to cook beef stew, vegetables, pasturize water, hardboil eggs, cook rice, and even make super delicious solar cakes.

The solar reflectors are basically just cardboard which is covered in a laquer to make it water resistant, with the inner side covered in a film of mylar. The box is shaped and made adjustable so that the sides can be adjusted to focus as much of the sun's rays as possible on the cooking pots- which are just light weight metal pots painted black. The pots are contained within a special (non melting) plastic bag which contains the heat. While the stoves do not reach temperatures hot enough to bring water to a rolling boil, it DOES heat things up enough to leave burn blisters of the fingers of those silly enough to touch the pots in the oven! (Yes, that would be me.)

We also trained the ladies how to use energy efficient charcoal stoves, and cooking bags -which work similar to a crock pot as you bring the boiling food up to cooking temperature, then immediately put it into the insulated bag for 1-8 hours and the bag maintains the temperature and continues to cook the food.

The training was hugely successful with a big tasty solar cooked lunch, but the solar cake was definitely the biggest hit of the day as people in the village cook over fire, they do not have ovens. We distributed the solar cookers to some of the participants so now they can make their own solar cakes whenever weather permits!

inside the greenhouse
inside the greenhouse

YAYYY!!! We have a greenhouse!!!

Built from 100% local materials, our greenhouse is a model which other farmers can easily replicate at their own homes. The only supplies they need to buy are the high density plastic and durrable netting. The poles are locally harvested with the bottoms soaked with used/discarded motor oil to prevent the structure from being eaten by termites.

Growing crops in the greenhouse helps the farmer retain humidity and over all climate controll for the crops, shelter them from pests and isolate the crops from fungi, bacteria, and visuses which can easily sneak from one crop to another via air, water, and soil.

We are currently growing tomatoes, cucumbers, greens, and peppers. As you can see, they look FANTASTIC!

greenhouse
greenhouse

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Project Leader

Lee Koelzer

Mukono Town, Mukono Uganda

Where is this project located?

Map of Water System for Peace Demonstration Farm, Uganda