Support education in Haiti with clean, safe water

 
$2,031
$15,469
Raised
Remaining
Feb 5, 2014

Our system helped Rochelle get into nursing school

Rochelle and her sisters with our country director
Rochelle and her sisters with our country director

Rochelle is a young girl with a dream of becoming a nurse. Like many of her 900,000 fellow Haitians, she had an obstacle in the way of her achieving her dream.

Before International Action installed chlorinators in Rochelle’s neighborhood, the water was unsafe to drink. Disease was rife. One of Rochelle’s sisters had to stop going to school for two months because she had chronic diarrhea caused by contaminated water. Rochelle’s family had to spend their savings on drinking water.

Once the chlorinator was installed, clean water became affordable, and life got better. Rochelle’s parents could save money for the girls’ education again. Rochelle’s sister recovered and has not missed any school time in two years. That’s how a chlorinator helped Rochelle to start nursing school. Rochelle started nursing school in 2013.

Nov 8, 2013

How Did Safe Water Lead to More Teachers?

School girl drinking clean water
School girl drinking clean water

Ten thousand people call Mont Jolly home. Clean water is available to them seven days a week because they have an International Action chlorinator. There is a small fee to buy water from the community tank, but even people from outside the neighborhood are willing to pay it because they know the water is safe. Since the installation of the chlorinator, water sales have doubled, accordingto community president Billy Osbene. Income from water sales now funds education for the children of Mont Jolly.

Although most people in Haiti live on less than $600 a year, the vast majority of schools are private. Usually, families pay dearly for their children to go to school, or teachers work as volunteers. The central government is trying to increase free public education, but the people of Mont Jolly decided to do it on their own. With funds from water sales, they hired eight school teachers. Children, many from the community’s poorest families, go to school for free in Mont Jolly.

The chlorinator brought clean water to Mont Jolly. Clean water brought public revenue. Public revenue paid teachers’ salaries, and made education attainable at last. And that’s how safe water led to more teachers!

Jun 27, 2013

Students to lead education about clean water, International Action to install more chlorinators

Abigail (14), a leader now and in the future
Abigail (14), a leader now and in the future

This is Abigail. She is 14. Abigail has big dreams. She wants to be a doctor. She wants to have a big family when she grows up. She wants to speak five languages. She wants to be a leader and help improve the community around her. She wants to start with clean water.  

There are 1,200 children like Abigail at the CFM school in downtown Port-au-Prince. Thanks to International Action’s chlorinator, Abigail and her classmates are healthy because they have clean, safe water every day. Abigail is one of the student leaders at CMF and she wants help spread the word about the importance of clean water, how it improves people’s health, and in turn, their happiness. 

Abigail and the director of the school want to start a community service project in which student “Clean Water Ambassadors” visit other schools to teach their peers about potable water. They have asked our staff to lead a week of seminars and trainings for the new Clean Water Ambassadors. The program will begin September, 2013, as the current school year has already come to a close. They plan to reach at least five schools in 2013.   

Abigail wants to lead change, she wants to help other Haitians protect their water supplies. We are with her. With your support we can support the Clean Water Ambassadors and install chlorinators in more schools. 

 

All the best,

Zach

Feb 25, 2013

25 schools to receive water tanks and chlorinators over the next six months

Children at the Lycee school in Mirebalais
Children at the Lycee school in Mirebalais

The Haitian government's water agency, DINEPA, has a new request for us: to install chlorinators and water tanks at twenty five schools in the West Department of Haiti. Nearly 18,000 students will have clean, safe water because of this project.

We already have the necessary amount of chlorine -- we just received a donation of 15 tons of chlorine -- to complete this project. However, we need funds for PVC pipes, faucets, solar pumps (there is no electricity in some of the schools) and transportation fuel. Once we have the necessary funds and/or donated materials, we will be able to begin.

In total we will need $6,375 to complete the 25 installations:

$1,375 for PVC pipes and faucets

$1,000 for transportation fuel

$4,000 for solar pumps

Solar pumps to be used at four schools
Solar pumps to be used at four schools
Nov 1, 2012

Cite Soleil Schools in need after Hurricane Sandy

Hurricane Sandy has swept through Cuba, Jamaica, and Haiti. Government officials have confirmed that 54 Haitian lives have been claimed by the storm, nearly twice the deathtoll of Tropical Storm Isaac, which hit Haiti less than two months ago.

As of October 30, 2012, President Martelly and Prime Minister Lamothe declared a State of emergency throughout Haiti because of the 54 deaths and the many problems the country now faces after the storm.

14,000 families have been left homeless, cholera is on the rise, and thousands of acres of crops have been destroyed resulting in a food shortage and price hike. 

Haiti's south was not the only region affected by the storm. In Port-au-Prince, thousands of school children in Cite Soleil are now without clean water because of the flooding caused by both Sandy and Isaac. The health of the children in Cite Soleil has been one of our main focuses over the past two years.

Because of the damage in Cite Soleil, we are going to truck water to the Cite Soleil schools so the children have clean water and can continue to learn. Diarrhea caused by waterborne diseases is the main reason children miss school in Haiti. The last thing these kids need is to miss a significant amount of school, as it will abate their abilty to find a good job as adults.   

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Organization

Project Leader

Zach Brehmer

Washington, DC United States

Where is this project located?