Build Bridges for Health, Education & Hope - Nepal

 
$1,579
$21,921
Raised
Remaining
May 9, 2013

STEM 4th Graders Lead Nepal WireBridge Restoration

STEM (CO) kids help others in Nepal get to school
STEM (CO) kids help others in Nepal get to school

Since 1998 38 WireBridges have been built in Nepal, and well over 3,000,000 passengers have made their way safely to their destination--with no reported injuries. The WireBridges make it practical for many kids to get to school, where otherwise attendence is dangerous, exhausting, or simply not allowed. Over the years a few WireBridges have been replaced by (more expensive) suspended bridges, and a few were destroyed by increasingly violent floods, but 33 remain.

Like all vehicles, these WireBridges need periodic maintenance. During Nepal's years of conflict it was not safe to return to the bridge sites, but now access is possible. Conditions are improving as the population becomes educated and more experienced with self-government, but local communities and the central authorities are not yet ready to maintain the equipment. Our continued interest and support makes a big difference as they develop.

Fourth grade students at the STEM Magnet Lab School in Northglenn, Colorado decided to help. Their message is attached. Our colleagues in Nepal, Village Solutions (VS), can restore the WireBridges. VS have nominated the WireBridge at Gothdanda in Nawalparasi District, where some 40-60 students want to use this bridge.

Restoring the Gothdanda bridge will cost about $3,700. About $3,300 is needed to supplement the STEM students' contribution. With help, we can put this WireBridge back in operation before the monsoon begins in mid-June.

Here is the message from VS: "Thank you for your interest for the repair and maintenance of Tarpul that were built several years before. We have taken [selected] the wire bridge from Gothdanda, Nawalparasi. Due to the lack of repair this wire bridge is not running now and people have to walk two hours to cross the river. Similarly, the school going children have to walk the same distance and takes more hours to go on the other side of the river for their school. The school's name is Bulingtar and 10-15 students used to attend school in 2002. So now the number have gone up to 40-60. There are about 60-70 households."

On the way to Bulingtar school
On the way to Bulingtar school

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Organization

Project Leader

David Sowerwine

Managing Director
Menlo Park, California United States

Where is this project located?

Map of Build Bridges for Health, Education & Hope - Nepal