Transform health in a Kenyan slum with just $26

 
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Carolina for Kibera’s data collection methods are getting an upgrade! Earlier this week, 100 new Google Nexus 7 tablets arrived at CFK’s U.S. office in Chapel Hill. The donation came by way of Inveneo, a technology non-profit that seeks to deliver technological tools to people who need them most in the developing world. CFK shares their belief that technological innovation can help connect people with life-changing services across many areas, including health, education, and entrepreneurship.

So what could we possibly do with 100 sleek, shiny new tablets? These tablets will be used by Community Health Volunteers to more accurately collect health data from thousands of families in Kibera! With more standardized and thorough data, CFK can better assess the community’s need for health services and outreach. A more complete picture of what the community needs will also help us evaluate the success of existing programs and pinpoint areas of improvement.

Thank you, Inveneo! With this donation, you’ve certainly advanced your mission and ours—to help people lead healthy, safe, and self-sufficient lives.

For the past 2 years, Carolina for Kibera has partnered with Ronald McDonald House Charities (RMHC) on a large-scale project to bring clean water straight to Kiberan families. The campaign, conducted by Community Health Workers (CHWs), reached thousands of people throughout Kibera and brought 3,235 easy-to-use hand-washing stations right to Kiberan households. In the process, CHWs conducted health outreach through door-to-door screenings, bringing basic health information and services to over 10,000 families. In short, through our collaboration with RMHC, CFK created great impact by keeping families, especially families with children under 5 years old, healthy and knowledgeable about health resources in their community.

We are extremely grateful for RMHC’s support, and incredibly pleased to announce that our partnership will continue for another 2 years! The aim of this renewed collaboration is to build upon the work that our team has already accomplished by training more Community Health Workers and providing additional health information and access to health services to families in Kibera, specifically as it relates to maternal health. RMHC has contributed millions of dollars to 9 organizations, CFK included, to continue bringing innovative health solutions to underserved communities. We are honored that RMHC sees the value in CFK’s work, the talent of CFK’s team of Community Health Workers, and the potential of the Kiberan community to thrive.

You can find the first half of the official press release announcing RMHC’s collaboration with all 9 organizations to which it has pledged support for the next 2 years by clicking here. Thank you again, Ronald McDonald House Charities!

When women are pregnant or breastfeeding, their bodies use more energy since they are essentially keeping someone else alive in addition to themselves. As such, they require more nutrients in order to keep both them and their babies healthy.

That fact might sound normal or routine, if you have the privilege of education and access to a reputable medical facility. In Kibera, proper health information is hard to come by, as is quality medical care. For Kiberans, proper nutrition during pregnancy or lactation is a serious and delicate matter.

Through its Community Wellness Program, Carolina for Kibera strives to provide families throughout Kibera with correct health information about a variety of topics, including nutrition, sexual health, and family planning.

Recently, the program held a training session on proper nutrition during pregnancy and breastfeeding. The audience engaged with several issues, including how to make sure children are getting proper nutrients, do’s and don’ts of lactation, and other facets of maternal health. Sanitation and hygiene were also discussed, since the lack of sanitation in Kibera presents a constant threat to the well-being of mothers and young children.

Esther, CFK Nutritionist, provided insight into the work she does bringing malnourished children back to full health at the Lishe Bora Mtaani Nutrition Center. She provided first-hand examples of the day-to-day realities the staff at the Nutrition Center face as well as pragmatic solutions that help kids stay on track. Keeping kids healthy and well-nourished from the moment they’re born is a top priority for CFK staff and volunteers. By disseminating proper information to the community at large, CFK is working to ensure that pregnant mothers are prepared to help them and their children stay in good health.

Millicent, with Mary.
Millicent, with Mary.

Recently I had the opportunity to tag along on a couple of “home visits” with Esther, one of the nutritionists at Carolina for Kibera’s Lishe Bora Mtaani Nutrition Center. Our destination was Gatwekera, a village in Kibera located south of the CFK office.

CFK staff members and Community Health Workers (CHWs) conduct regular home visits for several health-related reasons.  CHWs go door-to-door to administer health surveys, acquiring basic health information from families all over Kibera.  They also screen children for malnutrition; if the child is malnourished, they send them to CFK’s Nutrition Center.  The purpose of our visits was a little different.  We were checking up on some of the children who had completed the Nutrition Center’s 8-week program and been successfully brought back to full health earlier this year.

Esther is a resident of Gatwekera and led me through the maze of houses and narrow, winding streets— it’s been raining recently in Kibera, and although the dirt alleyways have been turned to thick, slippery corridors of mud, Esther made her way quickly and nimbly in her flats while I struggled to keep my balance in a pair of oversized gum boots.

Our first stop was at the home of Millicent and her 2-year-old daughter Mary, who was released from the nutrition center in January. As we stepped inside their home, Mary instantly hid herself behind the curtain separating the family’s bed from the main living area— she was happy to see Esther (her second mom/auntie), but wasn’t too sure about me. We sat down with Millicent and Esther asked her about Mary’s progress and status since leaving the center. She’s maintained a healthy weight, has good energy, and is meeting important developmental milestones such as walking and talking. Her mom told us that Mary is also a great eater: her favorite foods are rice and beans, spaghetti, and cabbage. Millicent also recently referred a neighbor to the nutrition center.

The home visits with Mary and other former patients of the nutrition center are a critical element of its holistic approach to treating malnutrition. Parents are equipped with the knowledge and skills to keep their children strong and healthy, and follow-ups serve to identify any challenges and provide support and assistance where needed. It was exciting and encouraging to meet the plump, happy, and healthy babies and their equally happy parents—it takes a village to raise a child, and nowhere does that ring truer than here in Kibera.

CHWs during the polio immunization campaign.
CHWs during the polio immunization campaign.

Health organizations worldwide treat even a single case of polio very seriously.  According to the Global Polio Eradication Initiative, “Most people infected with the polio virus have no signs of illness and are never aware they have been infected. For this reason, the WHO considers a single confirmed case of polio paralysis to be evidence of an epidemic – particularly in countries where very few cases occur.”

In 2013, 14 cases of polio were reported from the refugee camp in Dadaab (located in Northeastern Kenya). This was Kenya’s first occurrence of the disease since 2011. In response to the reported cases, the government of Kenya, supported by UNICEF and the WHO, began a polio immunization campaign in areas where the risk of polio is highest, such as in the refugee camps, on the borders, etc. Nairobi was also identified as a risk area, due to its population and transient nature. Social mobilization campaigns were organized within communities to draw awareness to the risk of polio, the importance of immunizations, and places/times where immunizations are available.

Carolina for Kibera’s volunteer Community Health Workers (CHWs) were rallied into the campaign. The government set the target of reaching 95% of children under the age of five (the most vulnerable population) in the three villages where CFK’s health programs operate. CHWs got to work, going door-to-door talking to their neighbors about getting their children immunized against polio.

Recently a report of the polio immunization campaign was released that indicated the targeted number of children under the age of five to be reached (11,123) in the villages where CFK works was met and surpassed by 32%. This means that a total of 14,651 children were immunized against polio and that CHWs managed to reach beyond the target to new families who had moved into the area or those who were passing through the three villages. None of the other villages in Kibera surpassed their targets. The second highest reach was 92%.

Not only does the polio campaign illustrate the effective way a community can rally around a cause and support one another, but it shows the high level of organization and trust that is present in places where CFK’s health program operates.

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Organization

Carolina for Kibera, Inc.

Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States
http://cfk.unc.edu

Project Leader

Leann Bankoski

Executive Director
Chapel Hill, NC United States

Where is this project located?

Map of Transform health in a Kenyan slum with just $26