Income Generation for 5,000 Poor Ethiopian Women

 
$20,165
$66,048
Raised
Remaining
Feb 6, 2011

New IGA beneficiaries - thanks to you!

ADDIS ABABA WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION

GLOBAL GIVING INCOME-GENERATING ACTIVITIES

SEPTEMPBER – DECEMBER 2010 REPORT

BACKGROUND

In Ethiopia, as a result of traditionally constructed gender roles, a stereotyped gender division of labor between men and women places women and girls in a subordinate position in society. The lack of access to and control over resources as prescribed by culture and tradition has forced females to disproportionately bear the burden of poverty, thus making them economically dependent on men and powerless to make decisions related to their human and reproductive rights. Women’s low social standing subjects them to various types of gender based violence, thus increasing their vulnerability and risk of poor health.

The low social and economic status of women and girls is a fundamental factor in maternal mortality. Low social status limits women’s access to education and good nutrition as well as the economic resources required to cover the cost of health and family planning services. For most women, employment choices are extremely limited due to various gender-based factors. Many women have come to rely on commercial sex as a means of sustaining their families. Abandoned women too often turn to urban prostitution as a means of economic relief, which rarely achieves this goal. Moreover, the low status of girls and women in Addis Ababa has forced many to dropout from schools. As a result, most women and families in this city, particularly mothers and female-headed households (FHH), are living below the poverty line.

Violence against women may be both cause and consequence of women’s low social and economic status. Women and girls are made more vulnerable to HIV/AIDS, disease, and unwanted pregnancy as a result of sexual and gender-based violence, physical and psychological abuse, sexual exploitation, female genital mutilation, early marriage, abduction, and rape, all of which are major acts that violate their human rights.

Through Global Giving funds, the Addis Ababa Women’s Association is helping economically poor and vulnerable women in Addis Ababa to implement income-generating activities (IGA) Under the Association’s programs, the IGA beneficiaries are offered reproductive health and family planning (RH/FP) services and training as well as trainings on gender based violence and harmful traditional practices. Women chosen to participate in this program are visited frequently by program and management staff for encouragement and advice.

GLOBAL GIVING BENEFICIARIES ASSISTED DURING THE REPORTING PERIOD

Through the generous Global Giving donations, ten economically vulnerable women, selected from Yeka sub city, were offered business management training and a seed grant of 1500.00 Birr each (USD $90). The stories of three beneficiaries are highlighted in this report.

As a result of Global Giving funds, women are organized into cooperative groups, allowing them to benefit from district government microfinance enterprise support provided for women organized in cooperative groups. The following are some of the benefits they reap:

  • The beneficiaries have legal status;
  • The beneficiaries benefit from the capacity building trainings offered by the district Microfinance office;
  • The beneficiaries have the right to access loan service if they wish to expand their business;
  • They are accountable to and monitored by the district microfinance office on their progress.

In addition to the business management training and seed grant provision, the beneficiaries are provided with a working house suitable to their business – producing food commodities in the cooperative.

 Yeshwamebrat Kassa, Gulele sub city, Kebele

Yeshawamebrat‘s husband died leaving her behind with three children and no means of income. Although she had a work place and experience in pottery, she was unable to work without seed funds. Instead she worked as a house maid washing clothes to earn living. This was also difficult for her as she is HIV positive. Yeshawamebrat was selected as an IGA beneficiary as a result of her hardships and entrepreneurial promise.

Yeshawamebrat is currently working hard collecting clay, cow dung, mud and other raw materials for her work place. She produces various types of popular new handicrafts. She produced a new design iron (cloth ironing equipment) made of clay that attracted the attention of many. For this design, she received an award from the sub city administration for being a model business woman.

Abaynesh Tolla, Arad sub city, Kebele

Her husband died leaving her with 5 children and without a means of income. Life was very dark and difficult for her. Abaynesh is now a beneficiary of the Global Giving fund and her life has changed dramatically.

Her children are attending school and as she says “they do not have food problem thanks to the business and I know how to operate it.” She also pays her house rent, utilities, and electricity costs in a timely manner.

Abaynesh is known for her delightful and charming face by her customers which attract many customers.

Simegene Tadesse, Nifasilk lafto sub city, Kebele

Her husband died leaving her with their three children and without a means of income.

Following the Global Giving IGA assistance, Simegene is engaged in a small tea and food shop in a house offered to her by the association.

In addition to sending her children to school, paying house rent, utilities and electric costs, she also has funds for savings. She says, “I do not want to beg from others if any of my children get sick or…. Thanks to the IGA, I have money now” she says with a charming face. She has many customers working at construction sites.


Attachments:
Nov 11, 2010

Progress on Income Generation for Ethiopian Women

Mintuwab Ketema
Mintuwab Ketema

Pathfinder/Global Giving

Income Generation for 5,000 Poor Ethiopian Women

September 2010

Through the support of generous Global Giving donations, Pathfinder is pleased to provide 11 Ethiopian women with start-up funds for income-generating activities (IGA). These funds are used by the new entrepreneurs to rent a shop, purchase equipment, and obtain additional materials. Previously, all of these women earned their living by collecting firewood, which is arduous and offers little financial gain. Through this initiative, these 11 women have launched a variety of businesses, including grain and vegetable trading, crafts trading and Injera bread baking. Three members of this Pathfinder/Global Giving cohort are featured in this report, which documents the transformative impact that IGA have on the lives of the women and their families. 

Mintuwab Ketema formerly earned her income through the sale of firewood that she collected from a distant forest. This occupation required that she walk 15 kilometers several times a week to collect the wood. The round trip journey would take nearly eight hours and Mintuwab would return home carrying a bundle of wood on her back. For this intense effort her earning was only 10 birr (USD $0.60).

This quarter, Pathfinder offered Mintiwab a seed grant to start her own small business enterprise. With these funds she established her own shop, from which she sells firewood purchased at the local wood industry. Her shop attracts numerous clients and the profit enables her to support her family. Mintiwab now earns approximately 30 birr daily (USD $1.80), which covers her living expenses, which include food, housing, utilities, and community association fees. She is grateful to have received the IGA award and proud to be an independent business owner.

Nunu Bereket and her husband have two school-age daughters in grade 7 and 8. Similar to the other Pathfinder/Global Giving IGA beneficiaries, Nunu previously earned her living through firewood collection. Thanks to the support of Pathfinder and Global Giving, Nenu was able to launch a trading business, in which she sells wheat, maize, butter, charcoal and sugar. Nunu is very satisfied with her new business, which she plans to expand, as it provides her with increased income, as well as relief from the dangers and stresses of firewood collection. In addition to providing for the basic needs of the family, Nunu can also cover the costs of her daughters’ education.

Buzunesh Desalgne is a widow and mother of six children. Like the other Pathfinder/Global Giving IGA beneficiaries, Buzunesh used to collect and sell firewood as a means of income. With help from this IGA initiative, she started an Injera baking business and she now sells the traditional bread to nearby cafeterias. The income from this business enables her to support her entire family.

Pathfinder is deeply appreciative of the continued generosity of Global Giving donors. This IGA initiative in Ethiopia is an important component of Pathfinder’s global effort to empower women so that they can support their families, educate themselves and their children, and engage themselves in the community.

Nunu Bereket
Nunu Bereket
Buzunesh Desnalge
Buzunesh Desnalge
Jul 29, 2010

Pathfinder Supports Income Generation in Ethiopia

PATHFINDER ANNOUNCES TEN NEW LOAN GRANTEES FOR INCOME GENERATION

Thanks to the generous support from Global Giving donors, Pathfinder is pleased to announce the addition of ten new entrepreneurs to its project in Ethiopia. With the ability to generate income and save profits, these women can better protect themselves and their families against health emergencies and changes in food security. They are now able to make investments for the future, including the education of their children.

Name: Etagegn Bika Background: Etagegn is a widow and the sole provider for her family. She is supporting three children and is very poor. She is engaged in the injera business. With support from Pathfinder, she has the initial funds to begin a business.

Name: Simegne Tadesse Background: Simegne is a widow and is very poor. She is planning to launch an injera business. With support from Pathfinder, she has the initial funds to begin a business.

Name: Worknesh Aigoda Background: Worknesh is a widow and the sole provider for her family. She is engaged in the injera business. With support from Pathfinder, she has the initial funds to begin the business that will support herself and her two children.

Name: Rawda Turga Background: Rawda is a widow and the sole provider for her five children. She is planning to launch an injera and local bread-making business. Without support from Pathfinder, she would not have the initial funds to begin a business.

Name: Abaynesh Tollo Background: Abaynesh is a widow supporting her five children. She has attempted to run a business to support her children but lacks the seed money. Support from Pathfinder will enable her to begin a vegetable trading business.

Name: Woinshet Sisay Background: Woinshet is also engaged in the vegetable trade, but is struggling to maintain income-generating activity due to lack of capital. She is the head of her household and her livelihood is based on the profits from the small business. She is supporting four children.

Name: Mulu Agi Background: Mulu is a widow and a single mother of seven children. Support from Pathfinder will help her succeed in the vegetable trade.

Name: Ketsela Mengistu Background: Ketsela is a widow with four children. She is engaged in the vegetable trade.

Name: Neima Mohamed Background: Neima is engaged in the grain trade, but is struggling to maintain income-generating activity due to lack of capital. She is the head of her household and her livelihood is based on the profits from this business.

Name: Etenesh Yalew Background: Etenesh is a widowed single mother with three children and is engaged in the vegetable trade. With support from Pathfinder, she will have the initial funds to begin a business to support the family.

PATHFINDER CONTINUES TO SUPPORT INCOME GENERATING ACTIVITIES

We are also pleased to announce that 13 Ethiopian women have begun income generating projects with support from generous Global Giving donors. Overall, the funds have enabled many of the women to leave the dangerous and exhausting business of firewood collection to pursue more lucrative, safe, and sustainable businesses in a variety of areas, including making and selling Injera (a traditional Ethiopian bread) and selling charcoal, grain, butter, and other items. As a result of their new ventures, many of the women are recording profits and have since been able to open savings accounts, which offer increased security for the women and their families. Moreover, the women report that their ability to yield profits in their new businesses has helped them to play a more active role in their communities. By demonstrating their capabilities, they garner respect in society and develop the confidence to address their needs and pursue opportunity.

Alemush Girma, a 40 year old divorced mother, began a charcoal selling business through Global Giving donations. She has radically improved her living conditions since leaving the firewood business. She states “These days I am very happy, I am very motivated for work as I am able to move here and there and feed myself with the grant I got... I am able to use my capacity for such work.” She now has savings, which she deposits in a bank account, and has become involved in the social affairs of her community.

Jul 14, 2010

Pathfinder Supports New Entrepreneurs!

PATHFINDER ANNOUNCES EIGHT NEW LOAN GRANTEES FOR INCOME GENERATION

Thanks to the generous support from Global Giving donors, Pathfinder is pleased to announce the addition of eight new entrepreneurs to its project in Ethiopia. With the ability to generate income and save profits, these women can better protect themselves and their families against health emergencies and changes in food security, and are more able to make investments for the future, such as in the education of their children.

Name: Worknesh Aigoda Background: Worknesh is a widow and the sole provider for her family. She is engaged in injera (a traditional Ethiopian bread) and local bread making business. Without support from Pathfinder, she would not have the initial funds to begin a business.

Name: Rawda Turaga Background: Rawda is a widow and the sole provider for her family. She is planning to launch an injera and local bread making business. Without support from Pathfinder, she would not have the initial funds to begin a business.

Name: Abaynesh Tollo Background: Abaynesh is a widow and she supports her five children. She has attempted to run a business to support her children but lacks the seed money. Support from Pathfinder will enable her to begin a vegetable trading business.

Name: Birhan Demewoze Background: Birhan is a single mother with four children. She is engaged in the used cloths trade to support her children’s education.

Name: Etenesh Yalew Background: Etensh is a single mother with five children and is engaged in the vegetable trade. Without support from Pathfinder, she would not have the initial funds to begin a business to support the family.

Name: Beletu Baineso Background: Beletu has four children and is the head of the household. She has no other source of income and is certain that the Pathfinder-supported vegetable trading activities she begins will enable her to support her family.

Name: Woinshet Sisay Background: Woinshet is also engaged in the vegetable trade, but is failing to maintain income-generating activity due to lack of capital. She is the head of her household and her livelihood is based on the profits from the small business.

Name: Neima Mohamed Background: Neima is engaged in the grain trade, but is failing to maintain income-generating activity due to lack of capital. She is the head of her household and her livelihood is based on the profits from this business.

PATHFINDER CONTINUES TO SUPPORT INCOME GENERATING ACTIVITIES

We are also pleased to announce that 13 Ethiopian women have begun income generating projects with support from generous GlobalGiving donors. Overall, the funds have enabled many of the women to leave the dangerous and exhausting business of firewood collection to pursue more lucrative, safe, and sustainable businesses in a variety of areas, including making and selling Injera (a traditional Ethiopian bread) and selling charcoal, grain, butter, and other items. As a result of their new ventures, many of the women are recording profits and have since been able to open savings accounts, which offer increased security for the women and their families. Moreover, the women report that their ability to yield profits in their new businesses has helped them to play a more active role in their communities. By demonstrating their capabilities, they garner respect in society and develop the confidence to address their needs and pursue opportunity.

Alemush Girma, a 40 year old divorced mother, began a charcoal selling business through Global Giving donations. She has radically improved her living conditions since leaving the firewood business. She states “These days I am very happy, I am very motivated for work as I am able to move here and there and feed myself with the grant I got... I am able to use my capacity for such work.” She now has savings, which she deposits in a bank account, and has become involved in the social affairs of her community.

Nov 25, 2009

Update on Income Generating Activities for Poor Women

PATHFINDER ANNOUNCES TWO NEW LOAN GRANTEES FOR INCOME GENERATION

Thanks to the generous support from GlobalGiving donors, Pathfinder is pleased to announce the addition of two new entrepreneurs to its project in Ethiopia: Atsede Wake and Simegn Tadesse. Now, Atsede, Simegn and their families are no longer resigned to lives of destitution and powerlessness. With an ability to save, these women can better protect themselves and their families against health emergencies and changes in food security, and are more able to make investments for the future, such as in education.

Name: Atsede Wake Background: Atsede is 47 and has experience in the fruit and vegetable trade and has already identified a location where she will run her business. Without support from Pathfinder, she would not have the initial funds to begin a business and would be unable to support her children for whom she is the sole provider.

Name: Simegn Tadesse Background: Simegn has strong business experience and has identified a place where she will set-up her business. Previously, her lack of start-up support prevented her from starting a business, and therefore she was unable to support herself and her family.

PATHFINDER CONTINUES TO SUPPORT INCOME GENERATING ACTIVITIES

We are also pleased to bring you an update on the activities pursued by the 11 women who have begun income generating projects with support from generous GlobalGiving donors. Overall, the funds have enabled many of the women to leave the dangerous and exhausting business of firewood collection to pursue more lucrative, safe, and sustainable businesses in a variety of areas, including making and selling Injera (a traditional Ethiopian bread) and selling charcoal, grain, butter, and other items. As a result of their new ventures, many of the women are recording profits and have since been able to open savings accounts, which offer increased security for the women and their families. Moreover, the women report that their ability to yield profits in their new businesses has helped them to play a more active role in their communities. By demonstrating their capabilities, they garner respect in society and develop the confidence to address their needs and pursue opportunity. A selection of the women’s stories are highlighted here:

Desta Alemu has started a new business making and selling Injera, as well as other miscellaneous items for which there is local demand. Her seed money has been used to purchase an energy-saving stove, grain, and maize. Currently, she is selling between 40 and 60 pieces of injera daily, yielding a profit of 15-20 birr/day (approximately USD $1.50). In the future, Desta would like to expand her business to include vegetable sales. Thanks to her new endeavor, Desta no longer must endure the longhours and great travel distances in her previous job collecting and carrying firewood. Additionally, she has been able to enroll her two children in school and is now able to pay rent, water and electric bills without feeling constant worry and fear. Desta believes that after 20 years of hardship this new business has enabled her to start a new life.

Nunu Bereket has been able to escape the business of firewood collection to begin a new business selling grain and butter, which she purchases from wholesalers and sells to people in her village. For the start up of her business, she has bought one sack of wheat and one sack of maize. On average, she is able to sell 25 kg of each item daily, yielding a net profit of 20-25 Birr (approximately USD $2), which she can reinvest in her business. According to Nunu, her new venture has helped her to cover the educational costs of her two children to attend school, has helped her to feel physically stronger, and enables her to participate in civic society, such as attending community meetings. She says this of her experience with the income generating activities: “Now I have money so I can work day and night and improve my family’s life”.

Abaynesh Degero has started a new business selling charcoal, grain, and other items in her village, profiting 15-20 birr per day. Thanks to this new venture, Abayinesh was able to enroll three of her children in school and is receiving medical care for a longstanding health condition which has continuously affected her mobility. Moreover, she reports that she has more time to participate in social gatherings in her community and in awareness raising events. She has expressed extreme gratitude for the funding she has received and is looking forward to expanding her business in the future.

Ehetehun Derebe is using her seed funding to start making and selling Injera. Support from Global Giving helped Ehetehun to purchase an energy saving stove, grain, and other accessories needed to start her business. A true entrepreneur, Ehetehun has already attracted a sizeable clientele, including a few contracts with local hotels. Thanks to her business, Ehetehun is now able to pay rent and other bills on time and attributes her business to providing her with time to participate in community social affairs and attend various events, such as local administration meetings.

Bizunesh Desalegn used her seed funding to start a business where she sells Injera to local restaurants. Her new venture has enabled her to open a savings account, a rare opportunity for most women in Ethiopia. In the future, she plans to expand her business by hiring additional staff so that she can target a greater number of customers. In her own words, Bizunesh says of the support she received: “it is as you can see… I am happy. I am not spending my day laboring in the jungle but rather am at home doing my business and making money. Many thanks to Pathfinder International Ethiopia and Addis Ababa Women Association who saw our problem and came with such a relieving idea”.

Mewuded Kassa started a business in grain, charcoal, and fruit trade, though due to skyrocketing price of crops she has recently focused most on charcoal, which brings in 10 birr profit (USD $0.80) per unit sold. Mewuded says that her new business has helped her to improve her morale and physical strength and provides her with a strong motivation to work. In the future, she would like to focus more energy on selling grains.

Alemush Girma was able to start a charcoal selling business with the seed money she received. When asked what changes have been brought about by her start-up, Alemush says that she is now able to avoid feelings of fear and desperation, and has hope about the possibility of living a long life.


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Organization

Project Leader

Dave Paek

Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

Where is this project located?