Give 30 Young Tibetans the Gift of Education

 
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Jul 29, 2014

The Glass Ceiling in Tibetan Medicine

It’s a conundrum. Gynecology occupies a special place in Tibetan medicine, but in Tibetan areas—and especially in rural communities—many women are reluctant to talk about their health problems. And not just because of social taboos. Most of the Tibetan gynecologists they seek out are men.

In a field not just dominated by, but almost exclusive to men, Cuoji was among the first Tibetan female gynecologists, trained both in the Western- and Tibetan-medicine traditions. In 2008, we were proud to support her to overcome traditional biases against women practicing medicine and pursue an MS in gynecology and pediatrics.

“The majority of the Tibetan rural population is still poor and the living standards are low. Many Tibetans can’t afford education, and their parents can’t help them,” she told us in a recent conversation. “My brothers, sisters, and I couldn’t have pursued higher education without Trace Foundation.” 

She is now a Tibetan medicine doctor at the Tibetan Medicine Hospital, where she is overcoming traditional biases and trailblazing as the first female doctor in her region. 

What she won’t tell you is that she is the most sought-out gynecologist in Xining. 

Each year, we support more than 500 individuals by covering the costs of tuition and living expenses. With your tremendous contributions, we've raised $25,773 for our project since December 2012 ($22,273 through GlobalGiving and another $3,500 through other donations). With your continued support, we know we can transform education on the Tibetan Plateau from the ground up, one donation, one student like Cuoji at a time.

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Apr 30, 2014

From the Rockies to the Mountains of Batang

Photo by Marvin A. Ross
Photo by Marvin A. Ross

Gerong Luobo has just finished his studies in cinematography at the Colorado Film School when he visits us at our library to tell us about his plans for his return to his hometown in Batang:

“I want to make a trilogy,” he says, smiling from ear to ear and pushing his glasses up the bridge of his nose. Inspired by the 1968 Italian Spaghetti Western Once Upon a Time in the West, his dream is to one day produce an epic that will combine historical events, religious stories, and his own experiences.

First, though, he wants to capture on film the stories, traditions, songs, and dances of the older generation of his hometown.

“The people in my hometown and the surrounding areas have a lot of stories to tell. There’s a cultural gap between the older generation and the younger generation. I want to pull back and start documenting those things before it’s too late.”

The students we’ve introduced you to through our project reports over the last year had one thing in common: they were all training to become teachers. But teachers are just a portion of the thousands of students we’ve supported in pursuing degrees in all fields—science, business, law, information technology, and film.

Gerong has become the latest addition to a storied pool of Trace alumni, filmmakers and cinematographers who include Pema Tseden (Silent Holy Stones) and Sonthar Gyal (The Sun-Beaten Path).

“I felt I could use this tool to tell a lot of the stories I’ve heard and seen in my part of the Tibetan Plateau.”

For us at Trace, it’s a win-win. We are as proud of Gerong Luobo’s achievements as we are excited to see what stories he has to share with the world.  

Each year, we support more than 500 individuals by covering the costs of tuition and living expenses. With your tremendous contributions, we've raised $25,668 for our project since December 2012 ($22,168 through GlobalGiving and another $3,500 through other donations). With your continued support, we know we can transform education on the Tibetan Plateau from the ground up, one donation, one student like Gerong Luobo at a time.

Photo by Marvin A. Ross
Photo by Marvin A. Ross
Photo by Marvin A. Ross
Photo by Marvin A. Ross

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Jan 29, 2014

Tenzin Takes the Road Less Traveled

Photo of SIT Graduate Institute by Jeff Woodward
Photo of SIT Graduate Institute by Jeff Woodward

Tenzin, one of our recent international fellows, has just a few days left in the States when he sits down with a cup of green tea and explains: “Trace gives students from very remote places the opportunity to see the bigger world. The young generation in these remote counties is the future. If you can open their minds, if you can give them a hint of what’s going on in the world, that’s the beginning of change. You ignited that.

At the International Language Institute, where he studied first, mornings were devoted to grammar and vocabulary, and afternoons were devoted to poetry, to art, to music. His favorites. That’s how he learned that teaching English is not just about reading, writing, and speaking, but about opening his students’ eyes to the bigger world. It was here that he fell in love with country music, and it was here that he read Robert Frost for the first time. He went on to a masters program in teaching English at the SIT Graduate Institute, then an internship at an immigrant-learning center, where he taught English of all ages.

Teaching all ages is not new for Tenzin. In the nomadic area he grew up, it’s not uncommon for middle schoolers to be as old as nineteen. If a kid’s family needs support at home—whether it’s in herding sheep or running errands—school can wait. In his school now, he is one of five English teachers, and the only teacher who has taken the road less traveled, the only teacher who has studied English abroad and the only one with a graduate degree. He smiles. “This opportunity and this scholarship totally changed my life, in terms of my future plans and profession. This will be my lifelong treasure.”

Each year, we support more than 500 individuals by covering the costs of tuition and living expenses. With your tremendous contributions, we've raised $25,353 for our project since December 2012 ($21,583 through GlobalGiving and another $3,500 through other donations). With your continued support, we know we can transform education on the Tibetan Plateau from the ground up, one donation, one student, one teacher like Tenzin at a time.

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Nov 7, 2013

No Student Is Ever an Empty Mug

Kelsang Gyi
Kelsang Gyi

Sit down with any Trace Foundation fellow, and they will tell you the same thing: There's a teaching style common in Tibetan areas of China called “Jug and Mug.” The teacher—the full jug—pours knowledge into the students—the empty mugs. And this teaching style is the single biggest challenge facing Tibetan students today.

“The teacher is the knower, and he or she transmits knowledge to the students by lecturing," one of our recent fellows, Kelsang Gyi explains. Since we supported her a few years ago to study teaching methodology and English in the United States, she has been winning her colleagues over, one at a time. The problem with Jug and Mug, she tells them, is that no student is ever an empty mug; and that's why she advocates for facilitating discussion, creating a safe learning environment, and encouraging students to become self-learners.

Each year, we support more than 500 individuals by covering the costs of tuition and living expenses. With your tremendous contributions, we've raised $20,548 for our project since December 2012 ($19,048 through GlobalGiving and another $1,500 through other donations). Moving beyond Jug and Mug is no easy goal, but with your support, we know we can transform education on the Tibetan Plateau from the ground up, one donation, one student, one teacher like Kelsang Gyi at a time.

Get a head start on your holiday shopping with a gift to our scholarship program!

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Aug 13, 2013

The Situation Today Is Dire for Tibetan Women

In 2011, around 900 senior middle school graduates applied for our Tibetan Medium Senior Middle School Graduate Scholarship. Of these, one third were female. Of the 300 females, only 80 were enrolled in science-related majors. That's why we have just developed new postgraduate scholarships programs, one for women in the sciences and another to support female professionals to pursue graduate degrees in law and business management.

Now your support can make more of an impact than ever.

With your tremendous contributions, we've raised $20,323 for our project since December ($18,823 through GlobalGiving and another $1,500 through other donations). We're more than a quarter of the way to reaching our end goal, but now we need your help again. Our next challenge is to raise $5,000 to become what GlobalGiving calls "superstars"—an organization picked out of thousands to receive corporate sponsorship recommendations, social media attention, and much more.

What does $5000 mean?

Your contributions mean more opportunities for making a difference in the lives of young women on the Tibetan Plateau like Kelsang Gyi, a young woman whom we supported to study in the States a few years ago. Now, she's back home teaching in Qinghai. While she’s faced considerable challenges back home—packed classrooms, a rigid teaching style she calls "jug and mug," and subpar teaching materials—her scholarship has steeled her for the future. She always gives her students the chance to think for themselves. She listens to them, respects them, and asks for feedback. And the students respond to this style wholeheartedly.

“My students love me and are very close to me,” she reports proudly.

Stay tuned for a full story on Kelsang Gyi in our next report.

Each year, Trace Foundation supports more than 500 individuals by covering the costs of tuition and living expenses, whether in the People’s Republic of China or abroad. Though we support a select number of fellows like Kelsang Gyi to study abroad, the core of our funding goes to students domestically, and that's where your help will make the biggest difference. 

Thank you from everyone at Trace Foundation for your ongoing support.

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About Project Reports

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Organization

Trace Foundation

New York, NY, United States
http://www.trace.org

Project Leader

Johnathan Wilber

Communications Officer
New York, New York United States

Where is this project located?

Map of Give 30 Young Tibetans the Gift of Education