Help 10 000 kids escape poverty and child labour

 
$57,641
$7,359
Raised
Remaining
Newcomers to the Zole Pre-School
Newcomers to the Zole Pre-School

The project team are working hard to reach their set targets of helping 10,000 kids to stay in education and break the cycle of poverty that has kept their parents and grandparents marginalised and exploited. They complete project reports every quarter where they evaluate progress made in the previous three months work.

The project has health, livelihood and education aspects to it. In the last quarter the education aspect of the project has achieved some fantastic results:

  • The team coordinated with the Department of Education to celebrate Children’s Day for the first time in 158 schools in the project area. The day was an opportunity to celebrate children’s rights and the importance of children completing their education and taking an active role in shaping their futures. 9,673 kids took part in the day’s activities.
  • The first phase of the project’s Reading Improvement Programme was completed in 35 schools. Of the 653 children who started the course 644 graduated on to the next phase of the programme. The programme insures any child who is struggling to keep up with their coursework through reading difficulties is supported to stay in school.
  • Mobile libraries distributed books in the villages to 615 children who otherwise would not have access to reading material.
  • Work has started on equipping 22 schools with digital classrooms which will including projectors, digital whiteboards and computers.
  • The team handed complete responsibility to the Zole and Sukewadi pre-school centres to the local management. This is always a big step for local schools as it means the team believe they have the capacity to run the school sustainably into future.

Daughters are often not as valued as sons in India. Traditional rural attitudes say that it is better to educate and care for boys. One of the aims of the project team is to educate the local community on the value of girls to the family and society as well as the benefits of keeping girls in education and out of early marriage. Preeti’s story shows what fantastic work the team are doing:

Preeti, two years old, lives with her mother and two elder sisters in a two roomed hut in the district of Ahmednagar in Sangamner. Preeti’s mother is out all day working as an agricultural labourer. Her father travels for work. The family have very little money. As a result of the lack of care and resources, Preeti went uncared for. When the project team first learned of Preeti in May 2014 she was just 6.5kg and was clinically diagnosed as severely malnourished.

The project team met with Preeti’s mother and convinced her to send Preeti to the team’s paediatric camps for malnourished children as well as the enrolling her in the local preschool centre. As per the doctor’s advice Preeti was proscribed supplementary nutrition to bring her back to full health. Project team members also alerted the local women’s self-help group to the family’s situation. The women members of the group visited the home to offer Preeti’s mother support and advice.

With careful monitoring by the project doctor Preeti is slowly being brought back to full health. She has gained 2kg and though she still has weight to put on to be fully healthy she is making good progress. She comes daily to the preschool centre and has made very good friends there.

Preeti’s mother has also benefited massively. She is a regular member of the local women’s self-help group and now works to convince others of the equal value of women and girls to society. She is hugely grateful to the project and all its supporters for the transformation she has been able to achieve.

Pintu, aged 6, lives in a small mud hut with his parents, two brothers and one sister. His family are from a Nomadic Tribe, a highly excluded community in India who are often denied their most basic human rights. Pintu’s Dad earns money selling small plastic goods and his Mother works in a cloth shop. Both parents are away from home throughout the day and are unable to care properly for Pintu. Being uneducated and illiterate themselves, Pintu’s parents saw little point in enrolling him in school and providing him with an education.

An essential aspect of the projects work is to carry out enrolment drives throughout the region. Local communities are taught the importance of keeping their children in school. They are taught the dangers of child labour and early marriage. The team use mass postering, local meetings and family visits to convince parents of the benefits of education.

As part of the campaign the project had sent a letter to Pintu’s parents encouraging them to enrol him in the local primary school. They followed up with a personal visit to the family. Pintu’s parents agreed to receiving help from the project team to enrol Pintu. Because the family could not afford it, the team also agreed to provide Pintu with educational material such as bags, uniform and stationary.

After overcoming some initial hesitation Pintu attends school regularly and is doing very well. He has become popular amidst his class mates and was elected class monitor. The project team make regular school visits to discuss Pintu’s progress with his teachers. They also provide support to his parents. Though they themselves did not receive an education they have seen the benefit in their son and are happy to keep him in school.

Thanks to the project and its supporters Pintu and other Dalit and Nomadic children like him will receive a full education. This would not have been possible without your support.

The project continues to work toward its target of maximum enrolment of school age children and higher completion rates of primary level schooling. In order to help them to do this the project team gather information on their activities as well as the results of these activities. This allows us to evaluate what is working and what needs changing.

We are really happy the way the project is progressing.

• 927 children in the project area enrolled in primary school this academic year. This is a significant increase since the team first started their work.
• The project provided 1,044 of the poorest children with study material. This includes notebooks, bags, books, stationary and geometry boxes. They would not have got these without the project and its supporters.
• 246 local teachers were trained in the latest teaching methods. Creative and interactive class room exercises are the best way to engage children’s interest, keep them in school and out of hazardous child labour. As part of the training, teachers were brought to an award winning school to see an example of these classroom methods at work.
• In three months the mobile library van visited 36 schools in 25 villages. 1152 children borrowed some of the 625 books on offer. This will be the only opportunity many of these children will have to access such reading material.
• Work on digital classrooms has started in five schools in the area. The classrooms will provide laptops, interactive whiteboards and LCD projectors.

The Karuna Trust is working towards keeping 10,000 kids in education in the region of Sangamner, Maharashtra, India. One crucial aspect of achieving our goal is making sure that children’s learning environments are engaging as possible.

Traditional teaching styles in India often use out-dated rote learning methods. This style of teaching is boring and leaves many children struggling to keep up. Faced with an uninspiring class room experience and difficulty meeting grades, many children drop out of school to work in unskilled manual labour jobs.

Modern teaching techniques take advantage of participative and engaging classroom methods. Children are inspired to learn and as a result gain better grades. As part of the project we train hundreds of pre and primary school teachers in participative classroom practices that keep children engaged and interested.

Here you will find some of the pictures from our latest teacher training day.

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Organization

Karuna Trust

London, England, United Kingdom
http://www.karuna.org/

Project Leader

Steven Murdoch

Staff Member
London, UK United Kingdom

Where is this project located?

Map of Help 10 000 kids escape poverty and child labour