Information Technology for Uganda Medical Students

 
$1,094
$33,757
Raised
Remaining

Information Technology for Uganda Medical Students

Information Technology for Uganda Medical Students
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Medical students consult a PDA

Medical students consult a PDA
A group of medical students at Makerere University huddle around a handheld computer to test its various features. (view small | med | large | orig)

Teaching PDA Basics

Teaching PDA Basics
Here, an instructor is demonstrating how to use a PDA. Handheld computers are very powerful, but handheld technology is easily adoptable, even by novice users, and it makes tedious record-keeping and data collection easier for health workers. Esther Nambala, a clinical officer in Uganda, tells us, “I use the PDA for many things….One of the major things is we fill in weekly and monthly surveillance forms….It has really simplified work.” (view small | med | large | orig)

Students earnestly examine their new PDAs

Students earnestly examine their new PDAs
Handheld computers can do many of the same tasks as desktops or laptops. They can hold virtual libraries of information including medical textbooks, journal articles, drug databases, national and international essential drug lists, national and international disease treatment guidelines, medical calculators, diagnostic tools, and continuing medical education (CME) and in-service training materials for doctors, nurses, and community health workers. (view small | med | large | orig)

Taking PDAs into the field

Taking PDAs into the field
Once the Makerere University medical students have graduated, they can bring their PDAs into the field with them. PDAs are small, but durable. In fact, they are better suited for use in hot and dusty environments than either desktops or laptops. PDAs can be used for patient tracking and record keeping, pharmaceutical inspections and management, public health program management, routine epidemiological and public health data collection, and in-service training opportunities. (view small | med | large | orig)

Africa needs more doctors and nurses

Africa needs more doctors and nurses
Across Africa, many communities suffer from a lack of trained health professionals, as demonstrated by the long lines of patients waiting at clinics like this one. PDAs make data collection and record-keeping more efficient, creating more time for doctors to spend with their patients. Handheld computers used to provide long-distance continuing medical education mean doctors do not need to leave their clinics unattended while they travel long distances to attend trainings. (view small | med | large | orig)

PDAs can provide more efficient record-keeping

PDAs can provide more efficient record-keeping
Using PDAs for data collection and record-keeping can be more accurate, efficient, and cost-effective than traditional pen-and-paper methods. Collaborating with the World Health Organization, SATELLIFE has used handheld computers to monitor HIV/AIDS patients on complicated antiretroviral therapy regimes in Uganda. (view small | med | large | orig)

PDAs work well in under-resourced environments

PDAs work well in under-resourced environments
This photo shows a rural health clinic in Uganda with no electricity. The solar panel hanging out the window is used to recharge a SATELLIFE PDA. Handhelds function well even in environments where electric service is intermittent or is only available through car batteries, solar, or other alternative sources. When linked to the GSM wireless network, they can be highly functional even in remote areas with unreliable telecommunications infrastructure. (view small | med | large | orig)

Retired Project

This project is no longer accepting donations.

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Organization

AED-SATELLIFE

Watertown, MA, United States
http://www.healthnet.org

Project Leader

Berhane Gebru

Director of Programs
Watertown, MA United States

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